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S&C UnderGround >> Anyone do HIIT? Any tips?


11/18/12 2:25 PM
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UGCTT_Fraser_Finlay
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Think I might start a HIIT program to do on Tuesday and Thursday mornings (will probably throw in another day so I can do cardio 3 times a week).

Right now I'm going for a run at roughly 6AM on Tuesdays and Thursdays. However, I've read online on a few different websites that HIIT is a much better way to lose fat than running at a steady pace.

It doesn't sound that hard: Walk for a minute; Sprint for a minute; Walk for a minute; Sprint for a minute, etc. I know that is a very barebones plan and it isn't what I'm going to do, it's just an example.

I'm interested in trying HIIT because it seems like something I would enjoy more than just hitting the road and running for a while.

Does anyone do High Intensity Interval Training and if so, could you please post you're routine or give me any advice? Thanks! :) Phone Post
11/19/12 4:46 PM
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shadallion
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I use the Sprint 8 program for HIIT if I want to sprint.

Just PLEASE warm-up and stretch out those hammies first.
11/19/12 8:59 PM
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Taku
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For me H.I.I.T. means minimal recovery periods. Sprint 8 does not qualify as H.I.I.T. as I see it.

TAKU

11/20/12 12:24 AM
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OregonChaelClosedDueToBandWagonCrash
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Sprint 100m

Walk back 100m

X10 Phone Post
11/20/12 1:40 AM
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grapplingwithzen
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A while back I watched a BBC documentary called "The truth about exercise". In the documentary they presented an HIIT program consisting of 30 seconds of maximum intensity, followed by 30 seconds of rest repeated 3 times. (They used a stationary cycle). From memory it was only once a week !

Even that limited amount of exercise was enough to produce increases in fitness, improvements in sensitivity to insulin etc.

For me, some days I do slow distance work, but once or twice a week I do HIIT. Since I don't want to do 100% effort sprints without a warmup I normally do a warmup consisting of walking, cardio consisting of about 2km of jogging, followed by 3 minutes of HIIT. It works quite well and doesn't take much time.

The funny thing is I really noticed the impact on the strength in my legs a lot ! My legs were pretty weak before, but I found my squat and deadlift improved subsequent to HIIT. I guess that near 100% activation of muscle fibres really has an impact.

I'm not an authority on HIIT but I thought it was worthwhile sharing this anecdote that only a little bit of a certain sort of training can have a bigger impact than you might expect.
11/20/12 1:58 AM
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UGCTT_Fraser_Finlay
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Well I tried HIIT for the first time about half an hour ago to be honest (good timing lol).

I got up at 6AM and walked down to the big grass field at the bottom of my street (football park) and sprinted from one end to the other then walked back. Done this 5 times. It actually felt pretty good, I'm just starting out so I didn't want to hurt myself by doing too much. I'll build myself up slowly like I did with weight training, no sense jumping in at the deep end straight away.

The first thing I noticed is how much more fun it is when compared to the traditional cardio I do (up at 6AM, jog for 30-45 minutes). Very rarely do I get to just let myself go and sprint as fast as I can, it felt pretty good.

Next time I will do it is Thursday. I've still got some reading to do but I think as a test run today went pretty well. Phone Post
11/20/12 5:42 AM
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Leigh
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HIIT will not burn as much as steady cardio. You simply do not burn the same number of calories. In any case, you lose fat predominantly through diet. I've been ill and not eating as much and I've lost 5-6lbs and look like I'm about 4% bf. No real training for about 6 weeks
11/20/12 7:19 AM
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HULC
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For weight loss it isn't better. But if you enjoy it stay with it.
11/20/12 7:21 AM
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419
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General advice: the best plan is the one you'll actually follow; do activities you enjoy in a sustainable manner (and eat more vegetables). The key word is sustainable, so don't skimp on warming-up, cooling-down, stretching, and recovery.
11/22/12 1:56 PM
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Taku
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Edited: 11/22/12 2:03 PM
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I do agree with what 419 has said above.

Just for some light reading...Some Interval training research simplified:

Metabolic Adaptations to Short-term High-Intensity Interval Training: A Little Pain For a Lot of Gain?

Martin J. Gibala and Sean L. McGee

Conclusions: As little as six sessions of high-intensity intervals over 2 weeks for a total of only approximately 15 minutes of very intense exercise can increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and endurance performance and later metabolic control during aerobic-based exercise.

IN PLAIN ENGLISH: Working very intensely (i.e., :30 on/:30 off for 15:00) offers comparable results to traditional endurance training (i.e., 45 minutes at a steady, but slower pace). This can make training more time-efficient.

The Effect of a High-Intensity Interval Training Program on High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Young Men

Danladi I. Musa, Samuel A. Adenirn, A. U. Dikko and Stephen P. Sayers

Purpose: Examine the impact of an 8-week program of high-intensity interval training on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) and the atherogenic index (TC/HDL-C) in 36 untrained men ages 21 – 36.

Conclusions: Findings support the recommendations of high-intensity interval training as an alternative mode of exercise to improve blood lipid profiles for individuals with acceptable physical fitness levels.

IN PLAIN ENGLISH: Having high levels of HDL cholesterol can play a protective role against coronary atherosclerosis since it acts as a lipid scavenger. In past studies, continuous activity endurance training has been proven to elevate HDL-C. To also elevate HDL-C levels and protect against coronary issues, high-intensity interval training can also be used.
 

11/22/12 1:57 PM
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Taku
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Cont:

Just HIIT it! A time-efficient exercise strategy to improve muscle insulin sensitivity

Martin J. Gibala and Jonathan P. Little

Highlights...

Public health guidelines generally recommend adults perform at least 150 minutes of “moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity (40-60% of VO2 max) per week or a minimum of 60 minutes of “vigorous-intensity” exercise (>60% VO2 max) per week to promote health.

Unfortunately, most people fail to meet the minimum physical activity guidelines, citing “lack of time” as the major barrier.

A growing body of evidence suggests that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) induces numerous physiological adaptations that are similar to endurance training despite a lower total exercise volume and training time commitment.

A common model used for HIIT is the Wingate test, which consists of :30 all-out cycling effort against a standard resistance: 4 to 6 x :30 effort with a 4 minute recovery, equaling only 2 to 3 minutes of actual work time spread over a 15 to 30 minute period.

In a recent issue of the Journal of Physiology, Richards, et. al. (2010) report a Wingate-based HIIT protocol consisting of only 16 minutes of all-out cycling over 14 days improved insulin sensitivity in previously sedentary or recreationally active young adults.

A modified Wingate protocol involved 8 to 12 x 1:00 intervals performed at 100% VO2 max with a 1:15 recovery time – 8 to 12 minutes of total exercise time spread over a 17 to 25 minute period. This was done for six sessions over 2 weeks and was a sufficient stimulus to increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and GLUT4 protein content.

11/22/12 1:59 PM
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UGCTT_Fraser_Finlay
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^ Very interesting. Thank you, voted up.

Do you guys think I should do HIIT 2 or 3 times a week? I'm currently doing 2, Tuesday and Thursday at 6AMish. Phone Post
11/22/12 2:01 PM
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Taku
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Cont:

Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Alterations During Exercise and Passive Recovery After Three Modes of Exercise

Athanasios Mandroukas, Jan Heller, Thomas I. Metaxas, Thomas Sendelides, Cheistos Riganas, Efstratio Vamvakoudis, Kosmas Christoulas, Stefanidis Panagiotos Stefanidis, Vasilis Karagiannis, Antonios Vasilis & Konstantinos Mandroukas

Purpose: To investigate the potential variations in cardiorespiratory and metabolic parameters and running performance among 3 modes of exercise of the same duration, namely, intermittent running with active recovery (AR) or passive recovery (PR) and continuous running (CR) and whether these variations could affect passive recovery time (PRT).

Conclusions: Intermittent exercise, regardless of implementing passive or active interval, might be the preferable exercise mode particularly in activities extended over 30 minutes.

IN PLAIN ENGLISH: Interval-type running can be just as effective – if not more – than conventional continuous running.

11/25/12 9:58 PM
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Taku
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Edited: 11/25/12 10:11 PM
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Some more interesting stuff...

LINK:

The second one is not exactly H.I.I.T.but another good argument for brief training sessions.

CLICK:

TAKU

11/26/12 11:24 PM
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UGCTT_Capnsavem
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good reads TAKU. thanks Phone Post
11/27/12 1:12 PM
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Taku
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You are welcome.

TAKU

12/3/12 8:10 PM
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irishrottie
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http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobes/2012/480467/

 

my thesis involves HIIT, surprising more people dont use it.

12/5/12 5:27 PM
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Crw
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In 4 later Phone Post
12/6/12 7:15 PM
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Mudderfaeg
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In Phone Post
12/7/12 11:33 AM
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Taku
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NEW "TABATA" style study:

Is There A New Way To Achieve Aerobic Fitness?
McRae G, Payne A, Zelt JJGE, Scribbans TD, Jung ME, Little JP, Gurd BJ. Extremely low volume, whole-body aerobic-resistance training improves aerobic fitness and muscular endurance in females. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism. 2012; 37: 1124-1131.
 
As detailed in prior issues, many studies have found that interval training is a safe, efficient, and effective way to increase cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and improve many other health related measures, often more so than traditional moderate intensity, steady state training. Most of the interval training studies though have involved use of conventional aerobic training equipment, e.g., the treadmill, and often the protocol is performed at very high intensity. For example, 10, one minute repeats may be prescribed at 90% of maximal heart rate or a 4-minute segment may be performed at that level. In one of the most effective but very high intensity protocol, the Tabata protocol, 8 to 10, 20 second repeats are performed with only 10 seconds rest in between repeats, with the workload for repeats at 170% of VO2max. The original protocol was developed for top competitive speed skaters racing at short distances, where extreme training intensity appears warranted. However, few people are at that level or have that goal.
 
 
McRae and colleagues noted the efficiency of interval training and that recent studies suggested that people enjoy this kind of training more than traditional endurance training. They also noted that the very short repeats in the Tabata protocol were quite similar to resistance training, perhaps, particularly circuit training. An additional point is that women have not been participants in most studies on brief, high intensity interval training.
 

 

12/7/12 11:34 AM
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Taku
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CONT:

The purpose of this study was to assess how an adaptation of the Tabata protocol improves CRF and muscle performance in women compared to endurance training. The study involved already physically active young women who were randomly assigned to a control group, an endurance training group, or the Tabata training group. The endurance training group trained 4 days per week for 4 weeks for 30 minutes on a treadmill at 85% of maximal heart rate, which is a considerably higher intensity (70%) than most endurance training. The Tabata training group also trained 4 days per week for 4 weeks with a novel adaptation of the protocol. They performed 8, 20 second repeats with 10 seconds in between repeats but used a different exercise for each training day including burbees, climbing, jumping jacks, and squats and thrusts. They performed as many repetitions as possible within each 20 second repeat and measure­ment showed that this elicited a heart rate of 85% to 90% of maximal heart rate.
 
 
 
Extensive pre and post testing showed that while the control group showed no change in CRF, both the endurance training and Tabata groups increased CRF by between 7% to 8%. However, most striking were the results for muscular endurance. While the endur­ance training group showed an increase in testing for repetitions for the pulldown, the Tabata training group showed improvements in the chest press, pushups, leg extensions, situps, and back extensions. Interesting too was that women in the Tabata group rated their training experience as enjoyable with intentions to continue.
 
 
Bottom-line: This is a short-term, small study with only 22 women. It remains unclear if beyond effects on CRF and muscular endurance that this typeof modified interval training produces other typical effects from endurance training. For example, the authors noted that at present there is not evidence for such an effect on maximal cardiac output. However, the results of the study are quite provocative. The actual training time in the Tabata protocol was 16 minutes per week compared to 120 minutes per week for endurance training. In addition, it appears that a wide range of exercise movements including, perhaps, circuit resistance training can be used to achieve the effects. And, most significantly, as has been the case in other interval training studies, people seem to enjoy brief interval training thus signaling a clear vehicle for maintaining this kind of training.
 
 
Importantly, the results were achieved with a far less intense stimulus than the original Tabata protocol.

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