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BJJGround Forum >> how do you teach? (question for everyone who does)


11/20/12 11:45 PM
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1armedScissor
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what is your general teaching philosophy? Do you treat all of your students the same? Do you have separate classes for your competition team as opposed to regular students? If not, do you expect your average students to keep up with your competition students? Are your regular students just "feeder" training partners for the comp guys/girls? Or is your goal as an instructor to find the way to make each student progress at the best rate of their own ability?
11/21/12 8:58 AM
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1armedScissor
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75 views and no opinions?
11/21/12 10:53 AM
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deepu
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Edited: 11/21/12 10:54 AM
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I try to teach a theme a week, with a review at the end of the week. Just by doing this I'm already not being fair to all the students as those that show up all week get the most out of it.

I'm a strong believer in bjj for everyone. Competition guys get special treatment only when they are preparing for a tournament but I try to get everyone involved in their training.

The only students that get a little bit of special treatment are the brand new ones who I spend a little bit more time with getting them to catch up a bit quicker. Honestly I find this a little hard and even a little boring. Still, seems necessary.

Ultimately though, since everyone has their own game, I try to add and adjust that when sparring with them, not when teaching technique. Of course anyone can ask about their games and open mat is great for that.
11/21/12 11:00 AM
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Silhouette
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my classes usually go something like this

warm up 10-15 min consists of all BJJ movements, not moves

then show one technique (drill said tech for at least 10 mins and really drilling not just do an armbar, next.)

add another move to the first move repeat

sometimes i will show a series not more than 3 moves show them separately then have the students flow with them, simple example is show armbar, triangle, omaplata, then show how you can interconnect said moves

then on to specific training with what we were working on if it was from back we work back, side we do side etc

like 10-20 free rolling ill sometimes pair up certain people

everyone gets treated with the same respect and attention, but you must treat different attitudes and personalities different

twice a week ill throw in judo or wrestling too because everyone needs takedowns
11/21/12 11:32 AM
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Judo Scott
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I usually send the 5 year olds to the weaker 12 year olds to boost their confidence.
11/21/12 4:00 PM
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The Elastic Assassin
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when i show a technique i break it down to its very basic philosiphy....you'd be suprised how many advanced people have never seen the "DNA breakdown" of most bjj techniques.....once you do that you have the beginners understanding and the advanced students seeing the varios tangents techniques can go in....i will then go into some of those tangents.....allow the beginners to practice the basics and the advanced students to perfect the basics and start modling them to their game with the various directions any technique can be taken......this also allows teh beginners to see that(for instance) a guillotine choke can be the beginning of a series of moves to get to an end and not just "a move"......

Bjj is a flow chart of if/then bubbles going off in all directions.....its my job to find a way for a stdent to see a way to manuver said flowchart.....

if that makes any sense....
11/21/12 6:47 PM
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joshjitsu
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Each student is extremely important to me no matter if they are white or Blackbelt. I even keep a log of who plays what type of game on a spread sheet.

We have a level 1 class which is a recycling curriculum of fundamentals. Then I teach the level 2 class which is a hard 15 warmup consisting or either exercise/drills/or situational sparring followed by 2 (sometimes 3) advanced techniques, then we do 45min of rolling, always starting from the standing position.

In level 2 we cover everything advanced and fundamental with a focus on sport Jiu Jitsu. We also have a level 3 class on Saturdays which consist of either 45 min drilling/ 45 rolling, all rolling, or open mat with myself or another instructor there for students to train with and ask questions.

Oh and you also never know if we are doing gi or NoGi until you show up that day. This keeps the NoGi guys doing gi and vice versa. Seems to work well. Phone Post
11/22/12 9:05 PM
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joshjitsu
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Please keep this going, I would love to see how more of you guys run your classes. Phone Post
11/22/12 10:32 PM
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CaptainTibes
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A big issue in teaching general population classes is structuring them so that the students can functionalize the techniques, without boring them so much they lose interest. I try to maintain continuity of material over several weeks, and review material at least once before moving on.
11/26/12 5:04 PM
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thebisket
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It's tough. Currently everyone I teach is in the same class. One of my favourite things to do is play with making sure everyone knows 2 different attacks and 2 defenses from each position, as I go through and people do it more than once, I vary it up so the longer people learn something new, and the new ones are still learning something new.
I Love the idea of varying gi and nogi. Gonna have to try that soon Phone Post
11/26/12 5:29 PM
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A_Butler
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We start with a warm up that involves bjj and wrestling movements. Shrimping all the way down mat, shots, "break dance", rolls, break fall roll backwards, and various movements for agility and balance.

From there we go to drilling. I always do five takedowns, arm bar from guard, hip heist, pendulum sweep, butterfly lifts, helicopter lifts, knee slide pass, bull fighter pass, and knee on belly switches. The takedowns are just starting the takedown. Like level changing to on a double and then stop. Arm drag to body lock then stop. Lapel and sleeve to hip in on a hip toss, raise your partner slightly, then stop. We don't go to the mat.

From their we break for water and come back to a series of techniques. Usually a technique and then a variation of the technique creating a chain. Usually no more than three techniques. We drill each tech for at least 10 minutes. Then review at the end. Every day is a different position that ties into the previous.

From their we do situational drilling. Usually guard passing drills. A few people down on the mat and a line of people filling when someone is swept, submitted or passed. We vary the position we drill on a daily basis. Usually a 15 minute period. Break for water.

Then five 5 minute rounds or 7 minutes depending on what we have going on. Line up, talk about what's coming up and end class. Phone Post
11/28/12 2:40 AM
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HoldYerGround
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There is NOTHING more boring than listening to 10 minutes of technical and conceptual instruction and then being left to your own devices for who knows how long, rinse, repeat. I don't always teach these days, but when I do...

I break shit up so its easily digested and students drill one at a time at high intensity inbetween multiple rounds of short instruction.

For example the spinning armbar series from knee on belly will be taught using four or so rounds of instruction and drilling: entering knee on belly and underhooking the arm, spinning into the armlock, confronting a roadblock to said armlock by getting a kimura grip, finishing the kimura position.

After this there will be a short time for free practice of the techniques and students are told exactly how long it will be. They are also reminded that we are doing isolated sparring using the taught positions, so instead of being bored and half assedly doing two reps before sitting on the side and BSing, the students feel the clock ticking and are eager to ask questions and practice on their own.
11/28/12 2:42 AM
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HoldYerGround
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"From their we do situational drilling. Usually guard passing drills. A few people down on the mat and a line of people filling when someone is swept, submitted or passed. We vary the position we drill on a daily basis. Usually a 15 minute period. Break for water."

Every time we do this at our gym the top 5 guys stay out for 15 minutes and the fodder get repeatedly dumped back into the line.
11/28/12 2:54 AM
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HoldYerGround
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When I was brand new I used to think that the more "little details" that make a technique work the better. I thought that my instructor didn't mention all of them whenever he taught because he didn't know them all (not that he was incompetent, just that there are SO MANY).

Now I realize that you want to do as LITTLE instruction as possible to achieve maximum results with the students. Verbal instruction is simply a means to an end and many times I find proper drilling and sparring to be a much more efficient route to that end.
11/28/12 3:12 AM
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Hargreaves
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I have lost comps and won gold in comps as well so I'm not perfect I'm a 2 stripe purple because I stopped bjj to train in MMA for the last couple years...




If I teach anybody I basically tell them to seek out high level people.


1st
If I do teach which is rare I start my warm ups by teaching to parry strikes,dodge,get a reaction from a leg strike/or counter a leg strike by entering a clinch

2nd
Royler Gracie said to warm up with clinch basics and entering the clinch against strikes in stead of push ups and other exercises so I really follow that.

3rd
teach gracie basics / combatives 100%

most important thing is rolling



if the people are above my level or equal we share knowledge

BJJ for ever and take care my friends
11/28/12 7:33 AM
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Akston
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Depends who is attending the given class and what I know their needs to be. I never go in with a definite idea of what will be taught, I cater to the makeup of the group that shows up that day. Phone Post
11/28/12 9:17 AM
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joshjitsu
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Hargreaves - I have lost comps and won gold in comps as well so I'm not perfect I'm a 2 stripe purple because I stopped bjj to train in MMA for the last couple years...




If I teach anybody I basically tell them to seek out high level people.


1st
If I do teach which is rare I start my warm ups by teaching to parry strikes,dodge,get a reaction from a leg strike/or counter a leg strike by entering a clinch

2nd
Royler Gracie said to warm up with clinch basics and entering the clinch against strikes in stead of push ups and other exercises so I really follow that.

3rd
teach gracie basics / combatives 100%

most important thing is rolling



if the people are above my level or equal we share knowledge

BJJ for ever and take care my friends
You teach striking in a BJJ class? Phone Post
11/28/12 10:10 AM
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RaginCajun54
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I start off with a basic stretching routine then I go into some warm ups that mimic or have similar movements to the techniques I am showing that day so I have a reference point when demonstrating the move. (I.E. If we are working butterfly sweeps I may have my students do Circle Shoulder Rolls or Butterfly Hook Kick Drags down the mat)

I always demonstrate the move first at real speed, then I break it down piece by piece. I try to break it down in less than 5 movements if I can to keep my students attention. After going over the move 2 or 3 times, I go over it one last time except I ask my students what to do in certain situations to make sure they were paying attention. This keeps everyone focused as they don't want to be seen as not paying attention in front of everyone.

I will add that my gym has a set cirriculum for our students each month and I must say that the student's knowledge retention has been through the roof since going to this type of BJJ program.
11/28/12 2:49 PM
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FreestyleJJ
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I do a minimal laps shrimping, break falls warm up. Then replace any extended warm ups with a drill section of class.

Beginners learn "how to drill" in a Simon's says type fashion. Learn to drill one or two things. Next time repeat and add one more. Repeat add one more. Focus is on variations that build good core movements/hip movements. This makes it easy for them to remember their basic syllabus, and teach them the value of drilling.

Advanced students use drill to get their core stuff in, then move on to whatever their current focus is.

Then standard new techniques, stopping to practice between, then roll. 1 hr drill/tech, 1 hr rolling.


My advanced students come in extra practices, some purely drill, some purely rolling practices. Phone Post
11/28/12 3:13 PM
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shen
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Edited: 11/28/12 3:21 PM
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Passive aggression, sarcasm, even outright hostility... there are many different tools to teach BJJ effectively. The trick is knowing which tool to use with each student. Which is not to say I treat students differently, I don't.

--Except for hot, female students. I worry they will get "creeped out" by some of the weirdos in the group class, so I only allow privates. To put them at ease, usually I'll bring them some flowers & candy... or read them a little poem I wrote... or maybe offer to take them out to eat after class. Stuff like that. --Oh, I'm also a bit of a tickler!
11/29/12 8:37 AM
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John Frankl
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Shen,

I see you've watched "Foot Fist Way"!
11/29/12 2:11 PM
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demandango
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In Phone Post
11/29/12 2:48 PM
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Digitsu
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For me, it really depends on the student's ability to grasp the fundamental concepts and their own personal drive to learn and grow.
 
 
When I first start to teach formally, I would do indepth into the minutia of the technique... almost like spoon feeding them the move.  Some students caught on and some would give me the deer in the headlights look.  Some of the guys who would be lost in the move would ask me @ the end of class to review the technique with them privately, which I gladly did until they got it. Sometimes it was just 5 minutes, sometime it took us 1 hour; either way, I made sure that that person understood the move.
 
 
Now, I'm more inclined to follow John Danaher's teaching method. I would lay out the foundation of the move with moderate details, explain why certain things are done and let the student go at it. John believes that Jiu Jitsu is a self correcting sport/art. You can teach/learn a particular move and all its details, but the viability of a technique can only be proven in application. Therefore, if I teach a move a certain way (I'm 6'2") and a student (let's say 5'2") can perform the basic foundation of the move (with some minor adjustments he/she discovered when drilling the move) in live training, then my job was done. I taught him/her a move that will stick with them for the rest of their BJJ career.  This is not to say I pay less attention now than used to... this method just makes jiu jitsu more fun for the learner. The discovery process is the best part for life; it helps teacher find out of the box ways to get through to the student. For the student, it is a better process, because it student truly learns rather than regurgitating what was spoon fed to him/her. (This can be applied to real education too not just BJJ.)
 
 
FYI, with this method, fewer students asks me to help them privately. For those who do, I still take the same time I used to and I don't take one single cent for this private time.
 
 
To answer your question on how I treat/teach competitors. I don't separate out the class (given the nature of the school schedule), but I absolutely feed my competing students non-competitors. I think this is mutually beneficial for both parties. For the competing students, I expect them to sew techniques together on a lower level opponent and against a higher level opponent, he/she should figure out what they need to work on and defend better. For the non-competing students, it's a great work out and it may motivate them to also compete in the future.
 
 
My goal is to help them reach their own personal goal. Competitors have their own thing and non-competitors have their thing everyone's mountain is different. I'm the Sherpa that  gets them to the top!
 
11/29/12 2:53 PM
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shen
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John Frankl - Shen,

I see you've watched "Foot Fist Way"!


Watched it? --I've LIVED it!
11/29/12 3:30 PM
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Team Python
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joshjitsu - 
Hargreaves - I have lost comps and won gold in comps as well so I'm not perfect I'm a 2 stripe purple because I stopped bjj to train in MMA for the last couple years...




If I teach anybody I basically tell them to seek out high level people.


1st
If I do teach which is rare I start my warm ups by teaching to parry strikes,dodge,get a reaction from a leg strike/or counter a leg strike by entering a clinch

2nd
Royler Gracie said to warm up with clinch basics and entering the clinch against strikes in stead of push ups and other exercises so I really follow that.

3rd
teach gracie basics / combatives 100%

most important thing is rolling



if the people are above my level or equal we share knowledge

BJJ for ever and take care my friends
You teach striking in a BJJ class? Phone Post

I know I do...it is a requirement in mythe academy to learn strikes from the standing position and on the ground......why....you don't think strikes belong in BJJ? Where do you think the Gracie's such as Carlson, Renzo, Ralph and other old school Jiu-Jiteiros learned striking from..........remember there was no suck thing as MMA back in the days......it surely was not around when I started BJJ......striking has always been part of BJ especially on the ground

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