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S&C UnderGround >> To Run Or Not To Run/Roadwork?


1/18/13 4:51 AM
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Koga
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Member Since: 3/12/02
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Agree with Wiggy that there is no "one size fits all" solution to address a variety of S&C needs and objectives. My touting the value of jogging was in response to the OP. If you were training for the military, you should run as ruggerbouy suggests to get the physical and mental fortitude you need. Good point on listening to your body, I'm sure most of us regret every time we tried ot "push through" an injury in training.
1/19/13 7:40 AM
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ash1
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big_slacker - My comment about it taking time was specifically in reference to Nick Diaz's triathlon training, and not that you can't benefit from doing some running. Just wanted that out there. Running is great for overall fitness and having an aerobic base won't hurt you. But fighting isn't aerobic (in the sense that running a marathon is) so you should really think about where to spend your time. I don't really have anything else useful to add if that doesn't make sense. ;)

On the subject of HRM, you can get a base model Polar HRM for under $50 on amazon or ebay, used even cheaper if you're really broke.

On the subject of HR vs. pace it varies wildly person to person. The only real way to know is to throw on a HRM and do a lactate threshold 'field test' and plug the results into an online calculator to get your training zones. Running at 150 BPM might be too low or two high depending on who you are.

Unless you finish the fight inside of about 45 seconds, fighting IS aerobic. Its this push towards HIIT/Crossfit and general lack of understanding physiology and energy systems that leads people to believe otherwise.

Any particular "effort" be it a workout, a run, a fight, etc. can and will generally utilize to some extent or another all three energy systems.

If you fight a 5 minute round, it is mostly aerobic, period. Bursts of activity within the fight might tap into alactic or lactic power....but over the duration of the 5 minutes you will need aerobic capacity to maintain because it will be the aerobic system supplying the energy.

Rather than saying is running/roadwork "wrong" the better question is how are you going to do it? While aerobic training is beneficial running 8 miles a day is overkill and unnecessary. Set goals for volume, wave it up and down over the training cycle in a periodized format and use heart rate as the measure of effort of intensity.
1/20/13 2:48 PM
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Ned Ryerson
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I never really believed in roadwork (and have always hated doing it) until I started training with a my Muay Thai coach. He has all of his fighters do a lot of roadwork and I've got to say, they always have amazing conditioning when they fight.

The way he explains it is very basic and logical. The roadwork/aerobic conditioning gives you the base to be able to go the distance of the fight. Without that base, fatigue will win.

I can't argue with his results because even though I still hate doing it, since I've added more roadwork into my training I have absolutely noticed much better stamina. Phone Post
2/10/13 9:51 PM
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Vitor Me A New One
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