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BJJGround Forum >> starting bjj @ 5 yrs old ,does it make u better ?


12/3/12 2:42 PM
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bjh13
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Hywel Teague -  You said it yourself, they were on the mats but they were playing. Training came later.

There is a big difference to taking kids to what are in effect structured rough-and-tumble play sessions in kimonos, to training them to become athletes.

And of the few who had experience of judo, it wasn't significant. Phone Post

I agree there is a difference, but I still feel that instruction is valuable. While that 5 year old isn't learning how to armlock people, they are becoming familiar with grappling and the positions. That playing around help with comfort and understanding later on.

Kids don't learn like adults. Teachers could probably explain this better than me, but most kids before they turn 12 or 13 would not be able to learn properly in a class structured like an adult class and would be unlikely to stick with it. This has it's same roots in why kids have all those belts and everything, they need different motivations than adults do to progress. Taking that into account I agree with you, everyone wouldn't really start learning in the way we are all learning until they are 14 or 15 because that is the age you start participating in the higher level classes instead of just the kid ones.

The question was more broad than that, at least the way I saw it. Sure, 5 year olds aren't learning BJJ as you or I, but they are learning by playing those games.
12/3/12 4:44 PM
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ChipW
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Given the same genetic potential, mindset, coaching, ect I'd say the 5 year old starter will be better.

The thing is its all those intangibles that really makes someone good so it's really going to depend on the kid. Phone Post
12/3/12 4:47 PM
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Hywel Teague
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bjh13 - 
Hywel Teague -  You said it yourself, they were on the mats but they were playing. Training came later.

There is a big difference to taking kids to what are in effect structured rough-and-tumble play sessions in kimonos, to training them to become athletes.

And of the few who had experience of judo, it wasn't significant. Phone Post

I agree there is a difference, but I still feel that instruction is valuable. While that 5 year old isn't learning how to armlock people, they are becoming familiar with grappling and the positions. That playing around help with comfort and understanding later on.

Kids don't learn like adults. Teachers could probably explain this better than me, but most kids before they turn 12 or 13 would not be able to learn properly in a class structured like an adult class and would be unlikely to stick with it. This has it's same roots in why kids have all those belts and everything, they need different motivations than adults do to progress. Taking that into account I agree with you, everyone wouldn't really start learning in the way we are all learning until they are 14 or 15 because that is the age you start participating in the higher level classes instead of just the kid ones.

The question was more broad than that, at least the way I saw it. Sure, 5 year olds aren't learning BJJ as you or I, but they are learning by playing those games.

You're right on the money about kids learning differentl.

There is a BJJ black belt from Florida called Luis Gutierres who coined the term "play as the way", which is/was a cool way of structuring kids' sessions.

He basically 'hid' skill development in drills and games. Clever stuff.
12/4/12 8:08 PM
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m.g
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Hywel Teague - 
bjh13 - 
Hywel Teague -  You said it yourself, they were on the mats but they were playing. Training came later.

There is a big difference to taking kids to what are in effect structured rough-and-tumble play sessions in kimonos, to training them to become athletes.

And of the few who had experience of judo, it wasn't significant. Phone Post

I agree there is a difference, but I still feel that instruction is valuable. While that 5 year old isn't learning how to armlock people, they are becoming familiar with grappling and the positions. That playing around help with comfort and understanding later on.

Kids don't learn like adults. Teachers could probably explain this better than me, but most kids before they turn 12 or 13 would not be able to learn properly in a class structured like an adult class and would be unlikely to stick with it. This has it's same roots in why kids have all those belts and everything, they need different motivations than adults do to progress. Taking that into account I agree with you, everyone wouldn't really start learning in the way we are all learning until they are 14 or 15 because that is the age you start participating in the higher level classes instead of just the kid ones.

The question was more broad than that, at least the way I saw it. Sure, 5 year olds aren't learning BJJ as you or I, but they are learning by playing those games.

You're right on the money about kids learning differentl.

There is a BJJ black belt from Florida called Luis Gutierres who coined the term "play as the way", which is/was a cool way of structuring kids' sessions.

He basically 'hid' skill development in drills and games. Clever stuff.

Actually that's how the Gracies learned Jiujitsu...through play.
12/4/12 9:28 PM
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BenBJJ
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"Someone say 4 year olds? "

 

12/5/12 6:17 PM
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12
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when you start @ 5 yrs old you should be in the adult advanced classes when your 12 yrs old.blue @ 16,purple @

16 1/2 ,brown @ 18 and black by 19 or 20 yrs old. 

12/7/12 1:29 AM
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WillyMaunawili
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Later Phone Post
12/7/12 11:15 PM
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angrypirate
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Zak Maxwell started @ 5. He turned out OK.
12/9/12 11:16 AM
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Hey Beer Man
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Zak maxwell would have been just as good if he started at 13 Phone Post
12/9/12 3:59 PM
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BenBJJ
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4 year olds have fun doing jiu jitsu. Who cares if it helps them or not win the world title at 18?
12/9/12 7:42 PM
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Paulo749
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jakeklipp - i think it depends on the kid, parents and instructor. you can force a kid to do a sport but you cant force him to love it. i think if you start a kid at 5 and just make sure hes always having fun you have a much better chance at developing a life-long monster than if you try to get him to win every tournament he ever enters right away. as for whether there is an advantage for the kid who starts at 5 vs 10... probably not. if the 10 year old was active and participating in other physical activities, then i think he develops just as quickly.
Agree Phone Post
12/9/12 7:52 PM
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Sir Taps
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Edited: 12/10/12 1:17 PM
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At 5-6 years old there's no huge benefit to BJJ or Judo in terms of developing grappling specific skills. Get your kid into gymnastics, then bring them over to BJJ/Judo when they're 13-15. Any kid with 7-8 years of gymnastics and 2 years of BJJ will be a nightmare.

James
12/10/12 11:21 AM
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bgup619
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anyone speaking about teaching kids in absolutes either doesnt teach kids or isnt good at it. kids are different, whats good for one could push another away.. different style programs can serve different purposes, both positve. In my experience a mix of the two has been the most sucessful for our program.
12/10/12 11:41 AM
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SlapUsilly
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Hey Beer Man -  Zak maxwell would have been just as good if he started at 13 Phone Post

JT Torres started at 14-15 and he beats Zak Maxwell 80% of the time.

Then again Zak Maxwell has a win against Kron, who is Rickson's friggin son and started out at like 2.


Moral of the story?
Who knows. I just wanted to say that.
12/10/12 4:18 PM
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dalexan242
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We got our son into judo at 4.5 (he's almost 7 now) and he loves it. His balance, coordination and strength have improved tremendously (both from where he started and compared to his peers), as well as his confidence. He responds well to the older kids in the class, who act as de facto assistant intructor.

We had him in gymnastics for a year before judo and he had fun with it, but it's at about that age that all the gymnastics classes go from 50% of each gender to 95% female. I'm sure he wouldn't mind hanging out flirting with a class full of girls, but he really thrives on the competition and physical contact of judo. He also just enjoys judo more than he did gymnastics (or wrestling).

I don't really think that starting him in judo so young is going to make him any kind of world champion, but its a great foundational sport for developing athleticism (he does other team sports as well, so he gets some run/jump training through those). I think the biggest advantage of getting him into judo so young is that, since I do it with him, it just becomes part of his weekly routine. Everything else may change from season to season, but school and judo are pretty much a constant. We also do the Bullyproof games together at home, but his schedule is pretty packed and I'm in no huge rush to get him into BJJ classes.
12/10/12 4:59 PM
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markus
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dependes on the instructor.
12/10/12 10:07 PM
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angrypirate
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bgup619 - anyone speaking about teaching kids in absolutes either doesnt teach kids or isnt good at it. kids are different, whats good for one could push another away.. different style programs can serve different purposes, both positve. In my experience a mix of the two has been the most sucessful for our program.

This.
12/11/12 7:35 PM
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BJJWorkouts
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I have 3 sons. The older two are in gymnastics and ninja warrior/Parkour with their gymnastics coach. They love it.

They also been on the mat since they were 2 but nothing serious, mostly the Gracie games and other Judo based games. Those games have built the physical and mental foundation for a great grappling game.

One time my oldest was grappling our neighbor in the yard, I simply said to do "crazy horse" and he instantly took the back.

Games and play work. Screw all that nonsense competition. Phone Post
12/11/12 7:59 PM
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Herbish1
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I would think the earlier the better. Tiger woods learned to golf at 2 and look where he ended up.

But I don't think a kid who starts at 12 is going to be that much behind, but I think a kid who starts at 12 is more likely to quit. Phone Post

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