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S&C UnderGround >> Anyone tried timed sets?


12/27/12 11:36 PM
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banco
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I believe these are also called density sets. For example you put 10 min on the clock put 60-70% of your one rep max on the bar for a military press and try to get as many reps in the 10 min as you can. If you get a preset number (I use 30) bump up the weight next time you try it.
12/27/12 11:58 PM
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Taku
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I use timed sets quite a bit. However I only use two minutes as my goal. I see how many reps I can get in two minutes.

TAKU

12/28/12 12:43 AM
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NeoSpartan
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Dave tate had a program he used with timed sets but it was more for hypertrophy. it was something in the 3x 45s range. If I remember to find an article or e-book later on I'll post it. Charles Staley popularized them the most imo with his EDT programs.

I used them pretty successfully. Weighted Pullups and Back Squats, 15 min, 5 rep max, never go above 3 reps and just mash out sets like a gangster. Great fun! But I've honestly seen more gains just using basic progressive resistance. Be patient... Put 5 more pounds on the bar...DOMINATE it...EAT...REST...Repeat.
12/28/12 12:51 AM
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banco
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NeoSpartan - Dave tate had a program he used with timed sets but it was more for hypertrophy. it was something in the 3x 45s range. If I remember to find an article or e-book later on I'll post it. Charles Staley popularized them the most imo with his EDT programs.

I used them pretty successfully. Weighted Pullups and Back Squats, 15 min, 5 rep max, never go above 3 reps and just mash out sets like a gangster. Great fun! But I've honestly seen more gains just using basic progressive resistance. Be patient... Put 5 more pounds on the bar...DOMINATE it...EAT...REST...Repeat.

I tried Dave Tate's version with some accessory stuff. I personally find it easier (rather than looking at the clock) to do a test run with a rep range and find out how long it takes ie if you are aiming for a 45 second set and you work out you can do about 17 reps in 45 secs just go with 17 rep sets.
12/28/12 9:44 AM
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Wiggy
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There are several different variations of Density Training floating around out there.  

I don't know who the first one to do it was, but Charles Staley pretty much popularized it.  His version was mostly for muscle building and fairly similar to what you're describing.  Usually two exercises training antagonistic muscle groups, moderate weight, 15-20 minute blocks.

Head strength coach at Wake Forest University Ethan Reeve (who is SUPER freakin' smart, BTW) had his own variation of Density Training, though it wasn't based on time.  Rather, it was about having a set goal of XX reps you wanted to do on an exercise uninterrupted.  You'd actually do double the volume, starting with that number of sets.  You'd gradually increase the reps and decrease the sets until you were ready to try to get all the reps in one set.  

So, if you wanted to do 20 chins, you'd start off with 20 sets of 2.  When that was easy, you'd 13 sets of 3 (the goal is to keep near 40 reps).  When that was easy, 10 sets of 4.  And so on.  Eventually, you'd be ready to try a single set of 20 uninteruppted reps.

I've written about applying Density Training to conditioning.  Pick a conditioning activity and try to pack more into a specific bout of time.  Or, so the same thing in less time.  For example, if you were doing 100 Burpees, pick whatever set/rep scheme you want, but each time you do it, try to do it in less time.  Another workout would have you doing Burpees for 10 minutes, and every time you'd try to do at least one more Burpee in that same 10-minute block.

Probably my favorite version of Density Training applied to weight training is Bryce Lane's "Have It All" routine.  You do one big exercise, 3-4 days/week.  Think bench, squat, OH press, and DL.  Put a heavy weight on there, and try to get 50 reps in 20 minutes.  When you can get all 50 reps, increase the weight.  Sounds simple, but will outright kick your ass if done correctly.

Wiggy - http://www.workingclassfitness.com


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