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BJJGround Forum >> Complete newb needs advice


1/5/13 12:18 PM
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VegasCJ
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I'm sure this has been a topic before but, the UG mobile app doesn't have a search function unfortunately. Ill be as descript and as short as possible.
I've finally decided to pursue BJJ. Put much time and thought into it as to not join then quit with some expectation of what it is/isn't and waste anyone's time. I want to come correct before I actually join up as to not burn the candle at both ends. With that said, I'm getting the physical end in order first : stopped smoking, building cardio back up (speed rope, running, cycling) , body weight exercises as well as kettle bell swings , my nutrition has been on point for awhile already plus a vitamin intake regiment. Etc.
My question to the seasoned JJ guys is where can I start to build knowledge up before I join a school? Any books you suggest? Helpful noob videos? Go watch a class? Anything that will put me on track to not being helpless in the beginning? Appreciate the advice in advance !

(P.S. : Thanks to powerful Eddie Bravo and Rogan for kicking my motivation in the ass to be even at this point) Phone Post
1/5/13 1:01 PM
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Herbish1
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You will be helpless, no matter what. Nothing can prepare you for what it feels like. You just have to do it. And your cardio is gonna fly right out the window once you start rolling.
1/5/13 1:01 PM
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CodeGeek
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Just go to class. BJJ is a life-long journey, so rather than doing all sorts of extra-curricular activities to get ready to start, just start. Nothing will get you into Jiu Jitsu shape faster than doing Jiu Jitsu, and nothing you watch will be better than learning and feeling it live.

That said, I think Roy Dean's Blue Belt Requirements DVD is one of the best resources for beginners. Even so, it won't help you all that much if you're not on the mats training. You need a point of reference that only training live will give you.
1/5/13 1:21 PM
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TheBearStare
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Best advice to you and any new guy and i dont mean anything disrespectful by it is, "shutup and train"

Jiujitsu is simple. the answer to almost all questions and dilemmas is to just train more. By doing so you will inevitably find what you were looking for. Its natural for people to overcomplicate and overthink bjj. Its easy as a newbie or someone in a bjj slump to get overwhelmed with questions, confusion or being puzzled as to "how i get from this belt to that belt" but if you simplify things and just get on the mats instead of talking, bam you will get your results.

Since you are a total beginner just know and accept that you will be confused(no matter what preperation you do) for a good while. Appreciate that! Let that motivate you to just keep training and take pride when little by little that confusion starts to disappear. Just know that it takes time, but thats okay because it is INEVITABLE as long as you keep training.

Sorry if that came off as rude or harsh. its not intended. Its the advice i give to a lot of new guys when they overwhelm themselves with bjj. Phone Post
1/5/13 1:27 PM
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TheBearStare
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Also bjj is great but its not necessarily for anyone. Dont feel bad if its doesnt meet your needs/expectations. If you do enjoy it but get discouraged the solution is to just keep training. To answer your question about a book. Id recommend saulo ribiero's jiujitsu university. However, id try some classes first to see if bjj is your thing before purchasing it. I like the book because it breaks down some of the essential mental aspects to give you perspective on how to approach bjj and technique wise its a good foundation covering all the major positions. Phone Post
1/5/13 4:01 PM
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kying418
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Edited: 01/05/13 4:02 PM
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Just check out a class ASAP.

No need to get anything else in order (diet, cardio, etc)...all those things can come later, or while you are training.

Additionally, like someone else mentioned, you might not even like BJJ- might as well try it out before prepping for it.

Are you in Las Vegas?  There are a bunch of awesome schools there, and we probably have some students on this forum that train there.  They would be good contacts for you, as well as potentially good training partners.  

1/6/13 9:00 PM
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VegasCJ
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Appreciate the responses and honesty! Been researching local schools and there's a few that all have good reviews that are near my side of town in the valley : Drysdale , Team Mica & Cobra Kai.
Anyone in Las Vegas have suggestions on what school to check out?
-BearStare , I took the book reference and picked up that Saulo book, definitely good stuff in there for a beginner but you're right in saying just going to a class is best bet. Reading up only benefits me so much without actually rolling
1/7/13 12:13 AM
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killer2005
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I've been doing BJJ for exactly a year now. Started 1/2 (no it wasn't a new year resolution). Here are a few things I've learned. Maybe it's the same for everyone, maybe not.

-you think you know everything from watching UFC and youtube and then you go to class and realized you don't know anything.
-you give up on youtube and buy books and DVDs
-you train and realized nothing from the books and DVDs work either
-you train some more and you start to do more live training
-you start to realize that live training and drilling is what's helping you
-you'll continue to get frustrated as you're getting beat by guys smaller than you, girls weaker than you and even 18yr kids weaker than you. wtf, you say to yourself.
-you learn a little more from live training, you go back to youtube and it makes a little more sense now but still not enough
-you train more, more drills, more live training and your game is getting better
-you want to do what the higher belts are doing but they just don't work for you
-you go back to youtube, books and DVDs.. they're making a little more sense now but you still get beaten
-you realize that the only way to get better is to train, ask questions to your instructor and advice from the guys you train with.

By the way, don't stop watching the youtube videos. Oh and most important, DO NOT give up your training.
1/7/13 12:13 AM
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killer2005
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Edited: 01/07/13 12:13 AM
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.
1/7/13 12:32 AM
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thegreatone287
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YouTube is most defiantly the thing that helped me in the beginning. after my instructor would show a move after class I would go home and try to research it e.g. 're watching. seeing it in a live competition. and so on. Phone Post
1/7/13 5:34 AM
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PointyShinyBurn
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CodeGeek - Just go to class. BJJ is a life-long journey, so rather than doing all sorts of extra-curricular activities to get ready to start, just start. Nothing will get you into Jiu Jitsu shape faster than doing Jiu Jitsu, and nothing you watch will be better than learning and feeling it live.

That said, I think Roy Dean's Blue Belt Requirements DVD is one of the best resources for beginners. Even so, it won't help you all that much if you're not on the mats training. You need a point of reference that only training live will give you.

What this guy said. Getting on the mat is the most important step and you should take it tonight if possible. No amount of reading or watching DVDs is going to make much of a difference to how badly you are a confused, helpless fish out of water at first.
1/7/13 7:43 AM
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Morgz
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Just dive in and do it!

And please don't say "powerful Joe Rogan and Eddie Bravo" out loud at your first class. Phone Post
1/7/13 8:35 AM
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onyx2002
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If you can check out a class with Vinny Magalhaes
1/7/13 10:20 AM
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Baroquen Record
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I agree with shut up and train.

It's better to come in clueless and have the instructor teach you than to read books or instructionals and think you know something.

There is nothing wrong with being clueless an being a new guy, but one thing that bothers everyone is the new guy know it all. Phone Post
1/7/13 10:57 AM
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htownbjj
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I agree with everyone saying to just train.

I'll add that I was initially doing 1 day per week of BJJ (plus Aikido, which I ended up quitting a few months later).

To try to supplement my training I watched Saulo DVDs and rode the exercise bike. Looking back, I should have just trained more. Even going up to 2 days per week would have been infinitely more helpful.

It's not that the DVD/cardio was bad in and of itself, but it was a waste of time compared to training. Unfortunately, I was only signed up for 1X per week.

Plus, the academy was not very beginner friendly at the time, so even when I increased the number days per week, I sometimes avoided class because I knew I would just get smashed and humiliated.

If I had been in a true beginner program, I probably would have dropped the DVD/cardio stuff quicker; instead, I used it as a crutch and a way to convince myself I was progressing without having to deal with the beatdowns.

If you can get into a good beginner program, I'd say put all the cardio, books, youtube, DVDs on the backburner and don't try to let them distract you from training on the mat.
1/7/13 12:42 PM
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Christophr
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Just train.
1/7/13 2:19 PM
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The Noose
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Good advice here. Another thing to mention is somethng you are already doing.
RESEARCH THE SCHOOL YOU THINK YOU WANT TO TRAIN AT.

This forum is a great tool. Before you sign up, ask around about the instructor, go check out a class, google his name, read about him.

A lot of people say, just go check out a school. Well that is definately important, but as a noob, you dont have any idea what to look for from an instructor anyway. A fake black belt with blue belt level skills could probably tool you so badly on the mat that you wouldn't really even tell the difference between him and a black belt if you dont have experience. Besides that, just because an instructor is a black belt, doesnt mean he is the best instructor for you. A good brown belt, or even a purple belt has a LOT to teach you, so dont rule out a school just because a black belt isn't teaching.

Picking the right school initially is important. Do it right and you will be able to grow and develop under someone who knows you and has a stake in your success.

So ask around before you sign up. Make sure the instructor is legit, the schedule works, and the atmosphere is welcoming and comfortable. Show up to class, be polite, be CLEAN, close your mouth and open your ears, be humble, don't expect results over night, and have fun.
1/7/13 3:18 PM
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T-Ham
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How much do you bench?

1/7/13 3:40 PM
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odennis
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1. Google closed guard.
2. Go to class
1/7/13 4:13 PM
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Poncey
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Go train at Sergio Penha's and learn from a legend.

And a nice bunch of guys Phone Post
1/7/13 6:06 PM
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DarceSideoftheMoon
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As nervous as you may be to do your first class just go do it. Once you do you will be sucked in and nerves leave and you'll want to just get back and try again and learn more. Most likely you will be paired with a friendly gym member that loves to help the new guy and will be overly friendly. That's how everyone else is too even though some may stare at you in disgust which will taper, sometimes slowly for certain people, when they realize you aren't a one day warrior and come back for more. You will get submitted alot, don't get discouraged you are now a living breathing grappeling dummy for your teammates, one day you will also have one of these at the gym.

Things to know... breathe. Don't hold on to a limb or head like your hanging from itand it is saving you from plumiting to your death, your arms will feel like you'll never be able to use them again. Breathe. Nothing your doing will help you like just training will. Google/you tube closed guard,open guard, side control, guard pass, armbar, triangle. Watch Demian Maia science of jiujitsu good for pointers on angles and breaks down mechanics well when your learning at first. There are many other great DVDs and books also but your gonna do it wrong, your body positioning will be tweaked by your instructors and partners. Don't hand slap fistbump unless initiated by a member at the school of your choosing and hold those osssss bottled up deep inside if you don't know what these are don't take your search for knowledge in that path. Good luck.
1/7/13 6:16 PM
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Magic Mago
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Nothing will really prepare you, just jump in and do it.

All those 3 schools you mentioned are good, try them all out and pick the one that you like the best. Phone Post

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