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UnderGround Forums >> How many miles a week do Elite Fighters Run?


1/25/13 11:21 AM
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Olive Garden Table For One
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Tilla - 
Olive Garden Table For One - 

The fact of the matter is: far too many MMA fighters are physically unprepared to compete for the duration of the contest they signed up to engage in. It is lack of preparation and lack of respect for themselves, the sport, and the fans who buy tickets. You can find a prettier way of saying that, or a justification, but facts are facts.


This.

Phil Baroni is one of my all time favourite MMA Fighters, but for somebody who LOOKS like he is in immense shape, he'd be gassed out within a few minutes. How does that happen?

Phil admitted that he trains for the mirror, and he smokes. It goes without saying, but I'm a huge fan. If MMA fights were just a single 3 minute round, Phil would be a top 3 Middleweight.

1/25/13 11:27 AM
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Bloodstorm
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Drewout - Long distance running is counter-productive to MMA fighting for most people.

You need to build a base of being able to run 3 miles in under 24 minutes - then you would just run 2-3 miles 1 time a week, but HIIT at least 2 times a week.

Also swimming is way better for overall cardio conditioning.

Train full body functional strength training (Martin Rooney at least 3x a week) it has to be with a plan - maintenance then periodization when you have a fight scheduled - not that Crossfit BS.

Train (not spar - drills,technique - get coached - improve) your effectively at least 1x a week independently - Stand-up (boxing, kickboxing, etc.),Grappling(wrestling-judo), Submissions (separately from your TD's & Defense), Then have an MMA day to mix it up. Hard-Spar 1x a week.

This will help you improve/maintain strength and conditioning, increase your technical ability, and with the sparring let you see your results and train properly for a fight, while still saving your body helping eliminate the chances of injury.

The most fundamental building block for conditioning is maintaining proper nutrition and rest - without nutrients your muscles can't improve or recover - without rest your body will begin to deteriorate and eventually go backwards you will begin to weaken you glands (pituitary, adrenal, etc.) get sick easier, and become injured easier.
Thank you probably the best info so far & from a fighter who has been there. Most of these marathon guys never did 3x5 rounds of MMA sparring in the gym. Let alone in competition where you have endorphins and adrenaline playing a factor Phone Post
1/25/13 11:35 AM
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Olive Garden Table For One
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MMA is the only sport where endorphines and adrenaline are a factor. But only if you fight in an octagon; a ring or a hexagon and you'll be fine. Pride had 10 minute first rounds, and somehow guys weren't dying. Gonzaga and Rothwell had about 3 minutes of cardio between them last week. 

1/25/13 11:41 AM
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Willin
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I'd be really interested in what Bendo does for cardio since he never seems winded after 5 rounds. I think he's said he trains for 7+ rounds in the gym.

1/25/13 11:53 AM
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LiveFromThe7x7
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Lots of guys hating on running are ignoring the fact that the most well-conditioned athletes in combat sports history (Dan Gable, Karelin, Fedor, Diaz, Ortiz) all did road work.

1/25/13 12:02 PM
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wiggum
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LiveFromThe7x7 - Lots of guys hating on running are ignoring the fact that the most well-conditioned athletes in combat sports history (Dan Gable, Karelin, Fedor, Diaz, Ortiz) all did road work.


I think we're also overcomplicating things. The reason those guys were in such great shape was because they did/do everything extremely hard.

My hunch is that if they used sledgehammers and kettlebells, they would have been in amazing shape, too.
1/25/13 12:12 PM
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Zed Wayne Zed
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And yet Sakuraba smoked cigarettes.

And Karo ate pies.

Sometimes, sadly, you can be in tip-shape and still get your ass walloped by a superior fighter who is just plain better.
1/25/13 12:17 PM
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LiveFromThe7x7
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wiggum - 
LiveFromThe7x7 - Lots of guys hating on running are ignoring the fact that the most well-conditioned athletes in combat sports history (Dan Gable, Karelin, Fedor, Diaz, Ortiz) all did road work.


I think we're also overcomplicating things. The reason those guys were in such great shape was because they did/do everything extremely hard.

My hunch is that if they used sledgehammers and kettlebells, they would have been in amazing shape, too.

That's sloppy thinking.

You remind me of guys who say, without any evidence, "Those athletes were in shape in spite of their training and not because of it!"

You and others are starting from the premise that road work does not improve MMA conditioning.

When offered contrary evidence - that is, countless examples of combat athletes who used road work - you don't even attempt to question the validity of your premise. Instead you explain it away by saying, "Oh, they would have been fine doing anything."

Meanwhile, athletes who do not run regularly gas out - an embarrassment to themselves and an insult to the sport and fans.

If the best conditioned athletes run and the worst conditioned athletes run, the proper conclusion to draw is not that running is ineffective because of some precious theory made up by strength and conditioning coaches who can't make any money telling a guy, "Do hard interval runs 3x week."

Ask yourself: Where did this mumbo jumbo about running being bad come from? It came from "theorists" who profit by calling themselves "strength and conditioning coaches" when in fact they are personal trainers and who earn a handsome living by drawing up workouts for athletes.


1/25/13 12:22 PM
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wiggum
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LiveFromThe7x7 - 
wiggum - 
LiveFromThe7x7 - Lots of guys hating on running are ignoring the fact that the most well-conditioned athletes in combat sports history (Dan Gable, Karelin, Fedor, Diaz, Ortiz) all did road work.


I think we're also overcomplicating things. The reason those guys were in such great shape was because they did/do everything extremely hard.

My hunch is that if they used sledgehammers and kettlebells, they would have been in amazing shape, too.

That's sloppy thinking.

You remind me of guys who say, without any evidence, "Those athletes were in shape in spite of their training and not because of it!"

You and others are starting from the premise that road work does not improve MMA conditioning.

When offered contrary evidence - that is, countless examples of combat athletes who used road work - you don't even attempt to question the validity of your premise. Instead you explain it away by saying, "Oh, they would have been fine doing anything."

Meanwhile, athletes who do not run regularly gas out - an embarrassment to themselves and an insult to the sport and fans.

If the best conditioned athletes run and the worst conditioned athletes run, the proper conclusion to draw is not that running is ineffective because of some precious theory made up by strength and conditioning coaches who can't make any money telling a guy, "Do hard interval runs 3x week."

Ask yourself: Where did this mumbo jumbo about running being bad come from? It came from "theorists" who profit by calling themselves "strength and conditioning coaches" when in fact they are personal trainers and who earn a handsome living by drawing up workouts for athletes.



It's not sloppy thinking. It's based on a lifetime's worth of experience at the highest levels of these sports.

People are always looking for the secret weapon to s&c. In the end, you have people who are in great shape who do new s&c (watch Frankie Edgar's conditioning videos) and those who mix drilling, sparring, and road work (Diaz). What matters is that the best conditioned athletes go really fucking hard.

Iowa wrestling runs sprints in the room, but also does sledge hammer work. Why are they in such great shape? They go really hard.

Running isn't the secret. Going hard is.
1/25/13 12:30 PM
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Willin
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^Wiggum is absolutely correct.

Not even for MMA training but pay attention at your local gym. Generally speaking the people in average to poor shape are doing various exercises at middling intensity. Usually these are the people you see doing some wonky exercises holding towels and rolling on balls which they read in some retarded magazine that is desperately trying to create new content each month.

Virtually all of the people in great shape are extremely hard and consistent workers... or they're on steroids, but that is a different story.

I'm constantly amazed at how much mumbo jumbo people buy into when it comes to working out.

The missing ingredient for the vast majority of people is extremely hard work. 90%+ of all people are pathetic weak sheep looking for the easy way of doing things hence the constant reinvention of working out.

1/25/13 12:36 PM
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Stona145
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Most high level boxers have over 100 amateur fights before they turn pro while most high level mma fighters have 0-5 amateur fights before going pro. Less time to get used to being in front of lights, cameras, crowd. Fighting in front a big venue with lights and cameras in your face is very nerve racking and your body pumps adrenaline which can also make you gas. Unless you experience it yourself it's very hard to understand.

Another thing to take into consideration is that it is 10x easier to get injured in MMA then boxing. More injuries = less time training and more time healing.
1/25/13 1:42 PM
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DAVID H
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Bloodstorm - 
Drewout - Long distance running is counter-productive to MMA fighting for most people.

You need to build a base of being able to run 3 miles in under 24 minutes - then you would just run 2-3 miles 1 time a week, but HIIT at least 2 times a week.

Also swimming is way better for overall cardio conditioning.

Train full body functional strength training (Martin Rooney at least 3x a week) it has to be with a plan - maintenance then periodization when you have a fight scheduled - not that Crossfit BS.

Train (not spar - drills,technique - get coached - improve) your effectively at least 1x a week independently - Stand-up (boxing, kickboxing, etc.),Grappling(wrestling-judo), Submissions (separately from your TD's & Defense), Then have an MMA day to mix it up. Hard-Spar 1x a week.

This will help you improve/maintain strength and conditioning, increase your technical ability, and with the sparring let you see your results and train properly for a fight, while still saving your body helping eliminate the chances of injury.

The most fundamental building block for conditioning is maintaining proper nutrition and rest - without nutrients your muscles can't improve or recover - without rest your body will begin to deteriorate and eventually go backwards you will begin to weaken you glands (pituitary, adrenal, etc.) get sick easier, and become injured easier.
Thank you probably the best info so far & from a fighter who has been there. Most of these marathon guys never did 3x5 rounds of MMA sparring in the gym. Let alone in competition where you have endorphins and adrenaline playing a factor Phone Post

I guess you missed my post...
1/25/13 1:45 PM
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DAVID H
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Although I will add that I usually did push-ups, pull-ups, burpees, dips, lunges, bear crawls, ect., after hard distance running.
1/25/13 1:50 PM
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MIKE CIESNOLEVICZ
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I know UFC vets who run like 10 miles a week and I know UFC vets who dont run a single mile.

I believe Dan Henderson said in an interview he hasnt ran in like 10 yrs haha.
1/25/13 1:56 PM
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ajl416az
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Stona145 - Most high level boxers have over 100 amateur fights before they turn pro while most high level mma fighters have 0-5 amateur fights before going pro. Less time to get used to being in front of lights, cameras, crowd. Fighting in front a big venue with lights and cameras in your face is very nerve racking and your body pumps adrenaline which can also make you gas. Unless you experience it yourself it's very hard to understand.

Another thing to take into consideration is that it is 10x easier to get injured in MMA then boxing. More injuries = less time training and more time healing.

this is one thing thats not really covered, especially when talking about inexperienced fighters.

a lot of guys aren't coming in shape, its true

but if you think getting tired is ONLY because fighters are in bad shape, you have no respect for the psychological aspects of MMA that make it so grueling.
1/25/13 2:02 PM
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gabemadrid
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Fedor ran 15 a day Phone Post
1/25/13 2:06 PM
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MartialArtsMixed
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Caught_clean -
MartialArtsMixed - 
Caught_clean - I remember Carwins training videos before the Brock fight he was up at dawn running every morning. I run but both sides are right really. You can get guys who come into bjj who run 10k several times a week and will gas in 3 times minutes because they dont know how to pace themselves or are just not used to it. Running is important but there are many ways to gain cardio for MMA. Most people gassing in the UFC in a round are doing so due to nerves/adrenaline dumps that go away with experience, or going nuts trying to get a finish in the first.
But if you have marathon cardio, you would still have lungs after the adrenaline dump and nervousness goes away to put up a good fight. Phone Post

Have you ever experienced a dump to any extent in any type of competition? It doesn't last a couple minutes and then go away. Ive had BJJ matches where I won the damn match in 45 seconds stepped off the mat and felt like I just rolled for 1 hour straight was physically sick. I still felt like shit in my next match 20 minutes later, but mind you this was my first tournament. Now imagine a UFC debut on National TV or something, and trying to keep those nerves under control.

I've been in situations where I had an adrenaline drop but was forced to carry on which I did and I thank my cardio for that. Phone Post
1/25/13 2:07 PM
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MIKE CIESNOLEVICZ
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MMA guys dont run as much as boxers. When I was training at Mayweathers gym the guys would do their 2-3 hr boxing workouts during day and always road work later in the day like 3-5 miles.


MMA guys generally train more circuit conditioning using weights/cardio combos and then their striking/grappling/mma workouts.
1/25/13 2:16 PM
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mchase126
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I believe, in your introduction to MMA, you should run a few miles every few days to build up a solid foundation of endurance. When you begin competing, then go away from it in favor of high intensity work.

Just work hard, plain and simple. If you can still stand, you can do another circuit. That is the mentality of a champion. Phone Post
1/25/13 2:18 PM
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Triple_B
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The majority of people in here don't know anything about the benefits of running.

All the high intensity strength and conditioning makes the heart stronger and more capable of pumping out alot of blood, but it is not doing it efficiently because your left ventricle does not get bigger when you constantly do high intensity exercises. If you add steady state cardio into the mix your left ventricle will grow which means more blood is being pumped per beat and more oxygen is available to your muscles.

Also, if you do a sport that requires any type of endurance over a decent amount of time you need a resting heart rate that is at the bare minimum in the 60 range, 50s would be better. Anything higher and you are out of shape, I don't care how much you lift or what hardcore circuit training you do. Guess what kind of exercise lowers that number?

Bench press numbers and testosterone levels are great, but if your heart is not working at maximum efficiency I think that is a problem.
1/25/13 2:26 PM
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Twelve Gage
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The guys I have worked with run a good amount I'd say 8-12 miles a week depending on how far out their fight is.

1/25/13 2:31 PM
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Darth_Vladar
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They are totally different requirements, boxing requires you to be far more agile on your feet for a much longer time.

Mma requires that too but a great deal of it is a higher level of physicality. Running miles upon miles will not help you when a mammoth dude has you locked up trying to rag doll you down. Phone Post
1/25/13 2:41 PM
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MasterofMartialArts
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Olive Garden Table For One -

The answer is: NOT ENOUGH.

MMA is the only sport where even the top guys aren't physically prepared to compete for the duration for their schedeuled event. 

MMA fighters (generalising) do not spend too much time with S&C, they spend too much time with training gimmicks instead of meat and potatoes conditioning like boxers and wrestlers concern themsevles with. Put down the club/kettle bell and underwater rock and pick up your running shoes.

I actually agree with you, Lupo. Phone Post
1/25/13 2:42 PM
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subwrassler
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gamer - Thats the problem in current MMA

Fighters are spending a majority of camps doing strength and conditioning

Instead of

Working on actual skill and technique


Thats why the skill level is so low in MMA compared to the skill level in boxing

Because boxers spend most of all their time actually working on technique, like how it should be

are you an mma fan?

i mean, the skill level is soooo low and all...
1/25/13 2:56 PM
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NINERS76
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I would say approx 15 miles on the road not to include what they do on a tread mill

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