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S&C UnderGround >> Question about weight training and calories


2/1/13 1:29 PM
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gatorlaw
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Hey fellas, first time posting on this subforum, so looking forward to the expert advice.  I've been working on a modified starting strength 3x5 program that incorporates power cleans and pullups (alternating with deadlifts).  Heavy weight, low reps, 3 times per week.  Other than my morning workouts, I'm an attorney so I stay relatively inactive throughout the day.

I'm currently 6'1", 165 lbs, with a body-fat percentage of 10% or so.  My goal is to add about 15 lbs of muscle over the next year while at the same time leaning out my body-fat percentage.

I've cleaned-up and restructured my diet to increase my caloric intake while reducing fats and processed carbs and am working on the 5 meals per day regimen.  Here are my questions:

  1. How many calories per day should I consume to achieve my healthy weight-gain goals?
  2. What percentage of those calories should come from fats, carbohydrates, and proteins?
  3. Has anyone had good results with a similar program/diet?
Thanks in advance for the tips.
2/2/13 6:12 AM
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Funaki Masakatsu #1
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Edited: 02/02/13 6:21 AM
Member Since: 9/18/09
Posts: 2864

It's really hard to try to gain muscle and lose fat at the same time. I find that doing one or the other and getting great results at that beats the so-so results of trying to do both at once.

Separate each phase into two; a muscle building phase and a fat loss phase. Each phase you will need to count every calorie you eat. For the muscle building phase, eat 500 calories above your maintenance calorie number. This puts you on pace to gain about 1 lb. per week. Depending on your natural hormone profile, the percentage of muscle gained vs fat gained will vary, but such a low calorie count over maintenance should keep fat gain small. Lift extremely hard during this phase, hitting every muscle group in your body including legs. I would also consider using a BCAA powder as I have had excellent results using this during workouts. Continue this phase until you're happy with your gains in muscle.

The fat loss phase comes after you've gained your muscle mass. Eat 300-500 calories below maintenance during this phase. Continue to lift hard.

Keep protein intake high and mix both carbs and fats into your diet. Eating a diet of 30-40% fats will increase your hormone profile. The rest of your calories should come from protein and carbs, with carbs coming before and after lifting and fats before bed. Eat protein with every meal. Get at least 8 hours of sleep each night to maximize growth hormone and testosterone release.

As for how many calories to eat each day, there are some formulas to calculate this, here is one:

"The Harris-Benedict formula

For this formula you use your age, sex, height and weight to determine your basal metabolic rate (BMR).

-For Men to calculate BMR = 66 + (13.7 x weight in kg) + (5 x height in cm) – (6.8 x age in years)

-For Women to calculate BMR = 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) – (4.7 x age in years)

...For your weight, 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds

...For your height, 1 inch = 2.54 cm

Example #1: You are a male, 35 years old, 6 foot tall (182.88 cm), you weigh 200 pounds (91 kg). Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) will be 66 + 1246.7 + 914.4 – 238 = 1989.1 calorie intake per day!

Example #2: You are a female, 35 years old, 5 feet 6 inches tall (170.69 cm), you weigh 132 pounds (60 kg). Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) will be 655 + 576 + 307.24 – 164.5 = 1373.74 calorie intake per day!

Once you know your BMR (basal metabolic rate) then use your daily activity factor to get your total daily energy expenditure (TDEE):

-Sedentary................BMR x 1.2 (little exercise)

-Lightly active...........BMR x 1.375 (light exercise)

-Moderately active.....BMR x 1.55 (moderate exercise)

-Very active.............BMR x 1.725 (hard exercise)

-Extremely active......BMR x 1.9 (hard exercise daily)

For example #1... if you are a moderately active male…your TDEE will be 1989.1 calories times your activity level of 1.55 which equals 3083 calories per day.

For example #2... if you are a moderately active female, your TDEE will be 1373.74 calories times your activity level of 1.55 which equals 2129.30 calories per day.

The Harris-Benedict equation has a separate formula for men and women, because as we already mentioned, most men have higher muscle mass and larger bodies"

So for example, my BMR is approx. 2500 calories, I need to eat 3800 calories on a moderately active day to maintain my weight, 4200 on an extremely active day, and 3000 on sedentary day. If I was trying to gain muscle, I'd need to eat 4300 on a moderately active day, and if I was trying to lose fat I'd need to eat 3500-3300 calories.

2/2/13 4:30 PM
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brigsy
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That's interesting. I always thought that you would calculate your activity multiplier according to how active you are generally during a week and use that formula during a week.

Are you changing the activity level daily multiplier daily according to the days output?
2/3/13 9:36 PM
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gatorlaw
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Great response Funaki. This sounds similar to the formulae that onepercentedge uses on their website. Phone Post
2/4/13 5:11 PM
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Funaki Masakatsu #1
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brigsy - That's interesting. I always thought that you would calculate your activity multiplier according to how active you are generally during a week and use that formula during a week.

Are you changing the activity level daily multiplier daily according to the days output?
Yes, do it daily, not weekly. A day where I Iift and then grapple at night uses up significantly more calories than a day where I don't do anything other than walk around for normal activities. Phone Post
2/4/13 5:11 PM
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Funaki Masakatsu #1
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gatorlaw - Great response Funaki. This sounds similar to the formulae that onepercentedge uses on their website. Phone Post
Thanks! Phone Post
2/4/13 7:23 PM
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brigsy
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Funaki Masakatsu #1 -
brigsy - That's interesting. I always thought that you would calculate your activity multiplier according to how active you are generally during a week and use that formula during a week.

Are you changing the activity level daily multiplier daily according to the days output?
Yes, do it daily, not weekly. A day where I Iift and then grapple at night uses up significantly more calories than a day where I don't do anything other than walk around for normal activities. Phone Post
Interesting. Thanks. Phone Post

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