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12/30/13 2:47 PM
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TFK_Fanboy
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Altofsky - 
TFK_Fanboy - Alto what's the minimum amount of coin a person would need to have a starter shop for knife making? Phone Post 3.0
2-300 to start safely and comfortably. Phone Post

Once wife and I seperate I will have a lot of free timein evenings. I may hit you up then for a basic list of things I should buy. I would love to practice and have something to do.

 

I will still be buying all my knives from you though ha. 

 

I did order a Chris Reeves Sebenza 21 small. Since the one guy you knew never responded. I should have it in Feb or so. 

12/30/13 3:52 PM
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exile27
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After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 4:42 PM
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Altofsky
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QuinTheEskimo -
Altofsky -
QuinTheEskimo - Thanks man, i somehow didnt even think to look on youtube. What books would you recomend though? Phone Post 3.0
$50 Knife Shop by... somebody.

I'm more of a visual learner. Gotta see it to understand it. Not the best resource for text. Sorry. :( Phone Post
Thanks man, ill buy that too. His name is something goddard, i read his "wonders of knife making" this morning. Good read but honestly the metallurgy information got way to technical in a hurry. Im going to hunt and see what if can find about someone breaking down the heat treat process really clearly for me. I was planning on just sending it off but mr goddard makes a very strong case for having a softer spine and it seems like id be kind of half assing it if i didnt try to do it right. I think ill order enough steel for a half dozen knives so i can have plenty of material to screw it up a few times and learn the process better.

I apreciate you being willing to talk to me about it, i mean no disrepect by trying to make my own here. I just like to learn a new skill every few months (or at least learn enough to respect the craftsmen who actually master a craft). Ten years in a machine shop working with steel has given me a deep apreciation for other types of craftsmanship. Phone Post 3.0
No disrespect at all dude. I encourage anyone interested to give it a go. Its very rewarding.

A short word on ht...

Start with simple steels... 1075, 1084, 1095 or 5160. All these can be had from Uncle Aldo at nj steel baron. Although he's out of 1084 till Feb. Follow the ht recipe and you'll be good. If you're looking for a soft spine out of a coal forge, don't waste time with clay. Edge quench in canola in a long shallow tray. Good results that way. And a bonus... etch in ferric chloride to bring out the hardening line. Different from a hamon, but still cool. Phone Post
12/30/13 4:46 PM
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exile27
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Hey Alto, how long did it take you to get to a point where you felt like your blades were high enough quality to sell? Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 4:47 PM
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Altofsky
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TFK_Fanboy -
Altofsky - 
TFK_Fanboy - Alto what's the minimum amount of coin a person would need to have a starter shop for knife making? Phone Post 3.0
2-300 to start safely and comfortably. Phone Post

Once wife and I seperate I will have a lot of free timein evenings. I may hit you up then for a basic list of things I should buy. I would love to practice and have something to do.

 

I will still be buying all my knives from you though ha. 

 

I did order a Chris Reeves Sebenza 21 small. Since the one guy you knew never responded. I should have it in Feb or so. 

Hit me up anytime and Ill walk you through it. Exile hit the ground running with his first two.

Dude also got into making his own micarta right from the start. And lucky me is getting some in exhange for a blade! Haha! Cannot fucking wait. Phone Post
12/30/13 4:47 PM
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MickColins
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TFK_Fanboy -
Altofsky - 
TFK_Fanboy - Alto what's the minimum amount of coin a person would need to have a starter shop for knife making? Phone Post 3.0
2-300 to start safely and comfortably. Phone Post

Once wife and I seperate I will have a lot of free timein evenings. I may hit you up then for a basic list of things I should buy. I would love to practice and have something to do.

 

I will still be buying all my knives from you though ha. 

 

I did order a Chris Reeves Sebenza 21 small. Since the one guy you knew never responded. I should have it in Feb or so. 

Superman is dead and he's still productive. Nice. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 4:48 PM
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Altofsky
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Oh and one more thing for anyone interested in making blades...

If you want any hope for success, you must kneel before CROM. Phone Post
12/30/13 4:50 PM
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ChrisAllen
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Any reason he filed the edge instead of using the grinder? 2 hours of filing damn. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 4:59 PM
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exile27
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Altofsky -
TFK_Fanboy -
Altofsky - 
TFK_Fanboy - Alto what's the minimum amount of coin a person would need to have a starter shop for knife making? Phone Post 3.0
2-300 to start safely and comfortably. Phone Post

Once wife and I seperate I will have a lot of free timein evenings. I may hit you up then for a basic list of things I should buy. I would love to practice and have something to do.

 

I will still be buying all my knives from you though ha. 

 

I did order a Chris Reeves Sebenza 21 small. Since the one guy you knew never responded. I should have it in Feb or so. 

Hit me up anytime and Ill walk you through it. Exile hit the ground running with his first two.

Dude also got into making his own micarta right from the start. And lucky me is getting some in exhange for a blade! Haha! Cannot fucking wait. Phone Post
Thanks man!

The micarta is actually really easy to make, and a lot of fun to mess around with. You can use pretty much any combination of fabric and/or paper you can think of to get some really cool designs.

If you've still got those pics I sent you, and feel like posting them, that'd be cool (I'm a mud). Give everyone an idea of what a "first" knife looks like. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 5:09 PM
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exile27
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ChrisAllen - Any reason he filed the edge instead of using the grinder? 2 hours of filing damn. Phone Post 3.0
I think because the point of that video was to show that you really can make a very decent knife with just basic tools.

Also, I've learned that grinders are kind of a "double edged sword" so to speak. They allow you to get things done way faster, but at the same time allow you to really screw things up, really fast! With hand tools, it's gonna take way longer, but you're much less likely to screw it up.

I started with 3 knives. I tried to grind the first one before I had asked Alto for pointers. I couldn't get my bevels even, and before I even realized it, I had removed half of the steel from the blade! I screwed it up so bad I had to scrap that piece of steel. That's when I sent Alto an email, and with his help was able to finish up the other 2 without destroying them. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 5:33 PM
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QuinTheEskimo
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Altofsky -
QuinTheEskimo -
Altofsky -
QuinTheEskimo - Thanks man, i somehow didnt even think to look on youtube. What books would you recomend though? Phone Post 3.0
$50 Knife Shop by... somebody.

I'm more of a visual learner. Gotta see it to understand it. Not the best resource for text. Sorry. :( Phone Post
Thanks man, ill buy that too. His name is something goddard, i read his "wonders of knife making" this morning. Good read but honestly the metallurgy information got way to technical in a hurry. Im going to hunt and see what if can find about someone breaking down the heat treat process really clearly for me. I was planning on just sending it off but mr goddard makes a very strong case for having a softer spine and it seems like id be kind of half assing it if i didnt try to do it right. I think ill order enough steel for a half dozen knives so i can have plenty of material to screw it up a few times and learn the process better.

I apreciate you being willing to talk to me about it, i mean no disrepect by trying to make my own here. I just like to learn a new skill every few months (or at least learn enough to respect the craftsmen who actually master a craft). Ten years in a machine shop working with steel has given me a deep apreciation for other types of craftsmanship. Phone Post 3.0
No disrespect at all dude. I encourage anyone interested to give it a go. Its very rewarding.

A short word on ht...

Start with simple steels... 1075, 1084, 1095 or 5160. All these can be had from Uncle Aldo at nj steel baron. Although he's out of 1084 till Feb. Follow the ht recipe and you'll be good. If you're looking for a soft spine out of a coal forge, don't waste time with clay. Edge quench in canola in a long shallow tray. Good results that way. And a bonus... etch in ferric chloride to bring out the hardening line. Different from a hamon, but still cool. Phone Post
Would you consider d2 a simple steel? I ordered a blank from knifemaking.com today that is 1/8-1 1/4-18" before i saw your last reply. It was only twenty bucks so im not screwed if i need to put it on the shelf. Goddard seems to be a huge fan of that steel so i thought id start there but i dont want to get in over my head for my trial run.

Also, i am looking at the simple firebrick forge from the $50 knife shop, i wanted a total of a nine inch knife handle and all. He says that that design is good for up to a 7" knife, was he refering to the blade or the total length?

Then again maybe i should just finnish the damn book before i blow up the thread with questions. . . Ill be back tomorrow once i finnish the book. The more i can pick up from there the less im going to bug you. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 5:38 PM
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exile27
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It's probably less than ideal, but I built myself a redneck forge out of an old BBQ and my wife's hair dryer... The HT seemed to turn out pretty decent though. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 6:00 PM
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QuinTheEskimo
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exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 6:18 PM
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exile27
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QuinTheEskimo -
exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
That's what I'm talk'n 'bout!

Sounds to me like you'd be starting out ahead of the curve then. I use a cheap 1x30 belt sander from harbor freight. It gives me pretty decent results (for a beginner) but I'd love to get my hands on a nice 2x72! I think the most important thing when it comes to the belt sander though, are the belts themselves. Alto recommended some belts to me, and directed me over to supergrit.com to buy them. They made a huge difference!

For the forge, I'd love to get a nice commercial one, but they're pricey! Just like the knife making videos, there are tons of how-to make a forge videos on YouTube. I just followed the one that looked the cheapest/easiest for me to build myself. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 6:50 PM
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Altofsky
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exile27 -
QuinTheEskimo -
exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
That's what I'm talk'n 'bout!

Sounds to me like you'd be starting out ahead of the curve then. I use a cheap 1x30 belt sander from harbor freight. It gives me pretty decent results (for a beginner) but I'd love to get my hands on a nice 2x72! I think the most important thing when it comes to the belt sander though, are the belts themselves. Alto recommended some belts to me, and directed me over to supergrit.com to buy them. They made a huge difference!

For the forge, I'd love to get a nice commercial one, but they're pricey! Just like the knife making videos, there are tons of how-to make a forge videos on YouTube. I just followed the one that looked the cheapest/easiest for me to build myself. Phone Post 3.0
If yore ever up near PA, youre welcome to have a go on my 2x72. Its a fucking pleasure to grind on. Makes it worthwhile freezing my balls off in this weather. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 6:52 PM
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Altofsky
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QuinTheEskimo -
exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
Just remember... use a wheel whenever possible as opposed to a platen. Platens generate excess friction and heat. Wheels are conatantly moving so they dont have that issue. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 7:04 PM
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Druken Fist Fight
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Hey QuinTheEskima do you know JoeTheEskimo if you do say hi for me.

12/30/13 7:23 PM
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TFK_Fanboy
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Could a BGE work as a furnace for HT? I can get 1,000 degrees in it Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 7:31 PM
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QuinTheEskimo
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Druken Fist Fight -

Hey QuinTheEskima do you know JoeTheEskimo if you do say hi for me.

I do not know a joetheeskimo, i just named myself after my favorite get stoned sing along. But if i meet on ill pass along your message Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 7:47 PM
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QuinTheEskimo
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Altofsky -
QuinTheEskimo -
exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
Just remember... use a wheel whenever possible as opposed to a platen. Platens generate excess friction and heat. Wheels are conatantly moving so they dont have that issue. Phone Post 3.0
I saw a trick where guys use compressed air blowing on the belt the entire time they grind to slow down the heat build up. Do you think that if i use that in conjunction with a bucket of water that i can do most of my grinding on the belt sander? Sanding belts are alot cheaper than grinding stones and i will need to buy my own abrasives to avoid feeling like im stealing from the company. (I chose to pretend electricity is free).

How do i know ive gotten hot enough to cause problems? I usually just hold whatever im grinding with pliers and dip it in water when the colors change, but i imagine that's not a good idea on something that im trying to control hardness. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 7:50 PM
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Alco Hauler
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I have an old blade from a lawnmower.  Can I make a knife out of that?  Or is that shit steel?

12/30/13 7:53 PM
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Altofsky
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TFK_Fanboy - Could a BGE work as a furnace for HT? I can get 1,000 degrees in it Phone Post 3.0

Farenheit? No, not quite.

You want something that can produce temps upwards of 1500F or 800C(I think that's the correct conversion).

 

12/30/13 8:00 PM
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ChrisAllen
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exile27 -
ChrisAllen - Any reason he filed the edge instead of using the grinder? 2 hours of filing damn. Phone Post 3.0
I think because the point of that video was to show that you really can make a very decent knife with just basic tools.

Also, I've learned that grinders are kind of a "double edged sword" so to speak. They allow you to get things done way faster, but at the same time allow you to really screw things up, really fast! With hand tools, it's gonna take way longer, but you're much less likely to screw it up.

I started with 3 knives. I tried to grind the first one before I had asked Alto for pointers. I couldn't get my bevels even, and before I even realized it, I had removed half of the steel from the blade! I screwed it up so bad I had to scrap that piece of steel. That's when I sent Alto an email, and with his help was able to finish up the other 2 without destroying them. Phone Post 3.0
Understandable. I was just wondering because he used the grinder to shape the edge after cutting the design. I have done automotive bodywork for over a decade so have a lot of use grinding and sanding. I know you have less control with the grinder and can ruin things quicker, could you grind half way then do the final shaping with the file? I once worked for a company that produced accessories for assault rifles and one of my coworkers was a knife maker and gave me a ton of steel scales that I have always wanted to make knives with but never have. Phone Post 3.0
12/30/13 8:05 PM
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Altofsky
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QuinTheEskimo - 
Altofsky -
QuinTheEskimo -
exile27 - After reading a few of Alto's threads, I also got inspired to give knife making a try. I just finished my first 2 knives right before X-mas. If knife making seems like something you'd enjoy, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. Be prepared though, cause if you're anything like me, you'll become addicted to it!

I did already have a few of the tools before I decided to start, but I'd say I spent a good $180-$200 to get started. I would suggest starting with the cheapest/minimal amount of tools you'll need to make a decent knife, without having to do everything by hand (unless you really wanted to do everything by hand). That way if you decide knife making isn't for you, you're not out a ton of money.

My biggest piece of advice would be to stay humble, and don't get discouraged when things don't turn out exactly as you wanted them to. Screwing things up and making mistakes are all a part of the process, and that's the only way you're going to learn and get better. Phone Post 3.0
Im very luck im that i have an entire machine shop complete with a dozen styles of grinders and belt sanders at my disposal. So far from what im seeing in the book altofsky recomended the only things im missing are the furnace/forge. Its nice being a grungy redneck somtimes. Phone Post 3.0
Just remember... use a wheel whenever possible as opposed to a platen. Platens generate excess friction and heat. Wheels are conatantly moving so they dont have that issue. Phone Post 3.0
I saw a trick where guys use compressed air blowing on the belt the entire time they grind to slow down the heat build up. Do you think that if i use that in conjunction with a bucket of water that i can do most of my grinding on the belt sander? Sanding belts are alot cheaper than grinding stones and i will need to buy my own abrasives to avoid feeling like im stealing from the company. (I chose to pretend electricity is free).

How do i know ive gotten hot enough to cause problems? I usually just hold whatever im grinding with pliers and dip it in water when the colors change, but i imagine that's not a good idea on something that im trying to control hardness. Phone Post 3.0

Sorry, I should've clarified.

Using a grinding stone isn't the best way to go. I meant an actual grinding wheel for a belt grinder/sander. It's a wheel attached to a tool arm that slides in where the platen normally would.

As far as controlling the heat, water works fine. I keep a bucket right below where my wheel/platen is set. Catches sparks and makes it easy to dunk the workpiece when it's getting to hot.

Rule of thumb... if it's getting uncomfortably hot in your hands, quench it in the water bucket. If it changes colors, you've let it get too hot. Now, before heat treating, you can correct that by normalizing(more on that later). After heat treat, if you've changed colors, you've ruined the piece. So cooling the blade is far more critical post heat treat. It is for this reason that a lot of makers, myself included, don't wear gloves while working. Your hands are gonna get fucked... but if you've got access to an entire machine shop... your hands are probably fucked anyway. :)

Now, if you do change the colors pre-heat treat, you can save your work by normalizing. But it doesn't have to be done immediately after the color change. You can keep grinding to your final pre-heat treat shape. Now, you will notice that you can grind those colors off. That doesn't mean the steel is okay. It is most definitely not at this point. By overheating it, you've changed the grain structure. If you try to harden it right from there, you'll have abnormalities inside the steel. So, in that case you normalize in your forge. Easy peasy.

To do this, you simply heat the blade to critical temp(varies depending on the steel, but most times a magnet is a good indicator. If the magnet doesn't stick, you're at or above critical temp) and air cool it from red/orange to black. It's actually a fun process to watch the steel cool like that. Do this three times and you've corrected your mistake. :) Go ahead and harden the blade from there. Follow with the prescribed tempering cycles for the desired hardness.

Again, if you change colors after heat treat, you've ruined the temper. You can try to normalize the blade and redo the heat treat from there... but it's usually much more difficult as the blade is much thinner at this point and far more prone to warping in the quench. So take GREAT care not to overheat the blade after it's been hardened and tempered. Slow speeds if your grinder has a VFD. It takes longer, but it's better than that "OH FUCK" moment when shit starts getting thrown around the shop in a rage. Trust me. Dunk it in the water after EVERY pass on the grinder and you'll be good.

Now, you can venture into the whole machining coolant systems and all that. But it's costly and unnecessary... though very beneficial if you've got the cash. Water works just fine.

And if you want to avoid steel dust clinging to your blade after each dunk in the water, just throw in a little dish soap or simple green. No sticking. :)

12/30/13 8:10 PM
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Altofsky
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QuinTheEskimo - 
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QuinTheEskimo - Thanks man, i somehow didnt even think to look on youtube. What books would you recomend though? Phone Post 3.0
$50 Knife Shop by... somebody.

I'm more of a visual learner. Gotta see it to understand it. Not the best resource for text. Sorry. :( Phone Post
Thanks man, ill buy that too. His name is something goddard, i read his "wonders of knife making" this morning. Good read but honestly the metallurgy information got way to technical in a hurry. Im going to hunt and see what if can find about someone breaking down the heat treat process really clearly for me. I was planning on just sending it off but mr goddard makes a very strong case for having a softer spine and it seems like id be kind of half assing it if i didnt try to do it right. I think ill order enough steel for a half dozen knives so i can have plenty of material to screw it up a few times and learn the process better.

I apreciate you being willing to talk to me about it, i mean no disrepect by trying to make my own here. I just like to learn a new skill every few months (or at least learn enough to respect the craftsmen who actually master a craft). Ten years in a machine shop working with steel has given me a deep apreciation for other types of craftsmanship. Phone Post 3.0
No disrespect at all dude. I encourage anyone interested to give it a go. Its very rewarding.

A short word on ht...

Start with simple steels... 1075, 1084, 1095 or 5160. All these can be had from Uncle Aldo at nj steel baron. Although he's out of 1084 till Feb. Follow the ht recipe and you'll be good. If you're looking for a soft spine out of a coal forge, don't waste time with clay. Edge quench in canola in a long shallow tray. Good results that way. And a bonus... etch in ferric chloride to bring out the hardening line. Different from a hamon, but still cool. Phone Post
Would you consider d2 a simple steel? I ordered a blank from knifemaking.com today that is 1/8-1 1/4-18" before i saw your last reply. It was only twenty bucks so im not screwed if i need to put it on the shelf. Goddard seems to be a huge fan of that steel so i thought id start there but i dont want to get in over my head for my trial run.

Also, i am looking at the simple firebrick forge from the $50 knife shop, i wanted a total of a nine inch knife handle and all. He says that that design is good for up to a 7" knife, was he refering to the blade or the total length?

Then again maybe i should just finnish the damn book before i blow up the thread with questions. . . Ill be back tomorrow once i finnish the book. The more i can pick up from there the less im going to bug you. Phone Post 3.0

Sorry to say, D2 is not a simple steel in terms of heat treat.

You CAN harden it with a simple forge and oil... but you won't get the best results. D2 has specific soak times for proper austentite(I don't think I've ever spelled that word correctly) formation. Soaking is what we call it when you keep the blade at critical temp in the forge... sometimes for up to 20 minutes at a time. Not possible with a simple forge without a thermocouple.

No worries though. If it were me, I'd put it on the shelf for the time being. Practice your grinds with mild steel first if you like. Or even wood. Sounds weird, but it helps get the feel for the grinds.

Just remember, you WILL fuck up the first handful of blades. Just a matter of severity. :)


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