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BJJGround Forum >> How did you figure out your game?


8/6/14 11:39 AM
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Drew Foster
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With me it was just showing up, doing what we worked in class, and especially finding grapplers I liked and copying their styles until I started finding my own game. I outright tried to copy certain people's styles, and eventually if you train long enough, keep training hard with tough training partners, and good coaching, it should work itself out.

The biggest thing for me was enjoying training. When I tried to over think what i was doing wrong, or what I should be working on, it backfired and just made me stressed and I didn't develop as well. I'd question things I was doing, etc. Once I started trusting myself and having fun enjoying the process, my game got a lot better. Finding a balance between having fun and also being mentally tough was key for me.

Competing is huge and has helped me, and everyone that does says it helps them. I don't compete much, but the whenever I have it has always given me a big jump.

But if you just keep training you'll figure it out no matter what.
8/6/14 11:51 AM
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NyTerp3
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dokomoy -
Chris Leben is a Zombie - 
dokomoy - Find a position/technique you like, it can be one you're having success with(though it doesn't necessarily have to be) or just something you think looks "cool" or "fits your game" or whatever and stick with it for a few months. Drill it as much as possible and try to use it whenever you can in training. If after a month or two you decide what you've been working on isn't for you than move onto something else, the biggest thing is you give yourself time to learn the position, don't be the guy who decides they're going to learn spider guard and stops using it for a week because he hasn't learned how to control the position yet and people are passing his guard left and right
Wouldn't it be fair to also say different body types simply don't work with certain games Phone Post 3.0

Of course. In theory though you wouldn't choose to experiment with a game that didn't fit your body though right? It doesn't make sense for the dude who can't invert to try and learn berimbolo or if you have super short/stocky legs you wouldn't spend all your time triangleing people. I do think it's worth mentioning that even if some games are considered a "big persons game" or a "small persons game" or a "game for long legged people" or whatever else most positions can still be used by people outside of the group a position is supposedly best for(Cobrinha is short but has a great spider guard, Leo Santos is tall but has a great butterfly, Cyborg and Buchecha are big but still are great at inverted positions and so on).

In any case, nothing that I said was a hard and fast rule - the point of it was that it's important to give yourself a chance to really learn something before you discard it, but if you feel like you have some sort of physical limitation I don't see any point in beating your head against the wall.
Great advice, man. I echo this sentiment. Way back when I was an early blue, I had no definable game. I asked myself in what position did I wind up the most. I realized people were flattening me out constantly, and I was wrapping my legs around one of theirs while holding on for dear life. There was probably a reason, based on my body type and physical ability, that I wound up there so often. So I started working almost exclusively on my half guard. I turned a position of weakness for me into a position of strength. Phone Post 3.0
8/6/14 11:57 AM
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Ryan Prouty
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Black Belt, Peoria, IL

try everything. Find out what you are good at or more importantly capable of doing fluidly.

Some stuff will not work well for you. Some will...

 

Byt eh time you hit brown IMO you should have a good idea of what you are going to be successful at and what moves you are rarely (never) gonna attempt.

8/6/14 12:27 PM
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Chris Leben is a Zombie
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Is there a basic "guideline" of which game works "best" for each body type? Phone Post 3.0
8/6/14 12:53 PM
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jasonhightower
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NyTerp3 - 
dokomoy -
Chris Leben is a Zombie - 
dokomoy - Find a position/technique you like, it can be one you're having success with(though it doesn't necessarily have to be) or just something you think looks "cool" or "fits your game" or whatever and stick with it for a few months. Drill it as much as possible and try to use it whenever you can in training. If after a month or two you decide what you've been working on isn't for you than move onto something else, the biggest thing is you give yourself time to learn the position, don't be the guy who decides they're going to learn spider guard and stops using it for a week because he hasn't learned how to control the position yet and people are passing his guard left and right
Wouldn't it be fair to also say different body types simply don't work with certain games Phone Post 3.0

Of course. In theory though you wouldn't choose to experiment with a game that didn't fit your body though right? It doesn't make sense for the dude who can't invert to try and learn berimbolo or if you have super short/stocky legs you wouldn't spend all your time triangleing people. I do think it's worth mentioning that even if some games are considered a "big persons game" or a "small persons game" or a "game for long legged people" or whatever else most positions can still be used by people outside of the group a position is supposedly best for(Cobrinha is short but has a great spider guard, Leo Santos is tall but has a great butterfly, Cyborg and Buchecha are big but still are great at inverted positions and so on).

In any case, nothing that I said was a hard and fast rule - the point of it was that it's important to give yourself a chance to really learn something before you discard it, but if you feel like you have some sort of physical limitation I don't see any point in beating your head against the wall.
Great advice, man. I echo this sentiment. Way back when I was an early blue, I had no definable game. I asked myself in what position did I wind up the most. I realized people were flattening me out constantly, and I was wrapping my legs around one of theirs while holding on for dear life. There was probably a reason, based on my body type and physical ability, that I wound up there so often. So I started working almost exclusively on my half guard. I turned a position of weakness for me into a position of strength. Phone Post 3.0

I am that exact point right now.  Being a featherweight been working half guard with sweeps that neutralize any weight disadvantage I have.

8/6/14 12:58 PM
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mflores1020
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So many great views on this subject and its great!!


I have always been a basics guy. I learned the basics and built from there. Through the years I just got really good at the basics and added a few tweaks here and there.

I was a wrestler through school so my natural position was top but at a certain point I had to change my game and do guard. Now I use the guard to get to top and work from there.

I have a core group of submissions that I do and I do them over and over. I don't try to get good and a thousand moves but try to do some moves thousands of times.

Its good to have a good rounded game just have to find out where you are better at and always strive to improve that area.
8/6/14 1:16 PM
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TheBearStare
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your game just kind of develops naturally and what you end up gravitating towards after all the things you have been exposed to.
8/6/14 4:27 PM
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Ryan Prouty
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Black Belt, Peoria, IL
Chris Leben is a Zombie - Is there a basic "guideline" of which game works "best" for each body type? Phone Post 3.0

No. Everyone has things they are good at and not so good at.

8/7/14 3:55 AM
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JZilla
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Ryan Prouty -
Chris Leben is a Zombie - Is there a basic "guideline" of which game works "best" for each body type? Phone Post 3.0

No. Everyone has things they are good at and not so good at.

Yeah and some people master some positions and others just get one or two solid moves from there and move on.

Eg deep half. Marcelo seems to only go for the shin in waiter sweep but his team mate faria has all types of sweeps from there. Both of them are successful from the position though

I also think your team mates play a big role as they put you in positions frequently and you develop styles to counter, eg I have an rdlr part of my game now because cross knee passes have been a bit of a craze over the past few years Phone Post 3.0

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