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UnderGround Forums >> Theodore Roosevelt would of been an MMA fan.

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9/2/14 10:48 AM
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jasonhightower
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Stumbled across this great quote from Theodore Roosevelt:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again,

because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause;

who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

9/2/14 11:03 AM
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Beninger
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Apparently big into boxing and wrestling, and also had an appreciation for Jiu Jitsu...

http://www.bartleby.com/53/59.html
9/2/14 11:27 AM
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TMT
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Before boxing exploded in popularity and when baseball and football were still evolving and before basketball existed, Americans from all social classes competed in submission grappling.

Two major styles were popular. Collar-and-elbow came from Ireland, and it involved submissions and shin kicks. Catch wrestling was also popular, and it came from England. It came along later than collar-and-elbow, and it incorporated collar-and-elbow techniques. It also included a wider array of safety measures, often banning chokeholds and always banning small joint manipulations.

I'm not totally clear on which historical figures practiced which style, but grapplers included: George Washington, Zachary Taylor, Andrew Jackson, Abe Lincoln, Ulysses Grant, Andrew Johnson, William Howard Taft, Chester Arthur, Teddy Roosevelt, and Calvin Coolidge.

9/2/14 11:32 AM
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jasonhightower
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Wow... I had no idea.  VU guys.

9/2/14 11:35 AM
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jasonhightower
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Beninger - Apparently big into boxing and wrestling, and also had an appreciation for Jiu Jitsu...

http://www.bartleby.com/53/59.html

Letter to his children:

...I still box with Grant, who has now become the champion middleweight wrestler of the United States. Yesterday afternoon we had Professor Yamashita up here to wrestle with Grant. It was very interesting, but of course jiu jitsu and our wrestling are so far apart that it is difficult to make any comparison between them. Wrestling is simply a sport with rules almost as conventional as those of tennis, while jiu jitsu is really meant for practice in killing or disabling our adversary.

In consequence, Grant did not know what to do except to put Yamashita on his back, and Yamashita was perfectly content to be on his back. Inside of a minute Yamashita had choked Grant, and inside of two minutes more he got an elbow hold on him that would have enabled him to break his arm; so that there is no question but that he could have put Grant out. So far this made it evident that the jiu jitsu man could handle the ordinary wrestler.

But Grant, in the actual wrestling and throwing was about as good as the Japanese, and he was so much stronger that he evidently hurt and wore out the Japanese. With a little practice in the art I am sure that one of our big wrestlers or boxers, simply because of his greatly superior strength, would be able to kill any of those Japanese, who though very good men for their inches and pounds are altogether too small to hold their own against big, powerful, quick men who are as well trained.

9/2/14 12:17 PM
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teamquestnorth
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jasonhightower -
Beninger - Apparently big into boxing and wrestling, and also had an appreciation for Jiu Jitsu...

http://www.bartleby.com/53/59.html

Letter to his children:

...I still box with Grant, who has now become the champion middleweight wrestler of the United States. Yesterday afternoon we had Professor Yamashita up here to wrestle with Grant. It was very interesting, but of course jiu jitsu and our wrestling are so far apart that it is difficult to make any comparison between them. Wrestling is simply a sport with rules almost as conventional as those of tennis, while jiu jitsu is really meant for practice in killing or disabling our adversary.

In consequence, Grant did not know what to do except to put Yamashita on his back, and Yamashita was perfectly content to be on his back. Inside of a minute Yamashita had choked Grant, and inside of two minutes more he got an elbow hold on him that would have enabled him to break his arm; so that there is no question but that he could have put Grant out. So far this made it evident that the jiu jitsu man could handle the ordinary wrestler.

But Grant, in the actual wrestling and throwing was about as good as the Japanese, and he was so much stronger that he evidently hurt and wore out the Japanese. With a little practice in the art I am sure that one of our big wrestlers or boxers, simply because of his greatly superior strength, would be able to kill any of those Japanese, who though very good men for their inches and pounds are altogether too small to hold their own against big, powerful, quick men who are as well trained.

Thats very interesting to read. Phone Post 3.0
9/2/14 1:17 PM
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John 'nottheface' Nash
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Self promotion time! I did an article on our toughest hand-to-hand fighting presidents. Teddy came in at number 2. http://www.cagesideseats.com/2012/11/5/3550218/the-martial-chronicles-fighting-presidents

9/2/14 1:48 PM
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jasonhightower
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John 'nottheface' Nash - 

Self promotion time! I did an article on our toughest hand-to-hand fighting presidents. Teddy came in at number 2. http://www.cagesideseats.com/2012/11/5/3550218/the-martial-chronicles-fighting-presidents


Ha, very cool.

http://www.cagesideseats.com/2012/11/5/3550218/the-martial-chronicles-fighting-presidents


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