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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Choice speech


6/26/03 4:28 PM
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Flashman
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Edited: 26-Jun-03
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 31
 
Does anyone out there, especially LEO's have any examples of choice speech that has worked for them in real life situations. Also, anyone got any specific drills they use for developing skill in the use of choice speech. Here's hoping this developes into an interesting thread. Gary.
7/1/03 4:28 PM
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JDDynamic
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Edited: 01-Jul-03
Member Since: 26-Mar-03
Posts: 8
Gary, While I am not a LEO, I have some thoughts. One drill I have adapted for our school is a variation of the ECT drills. I give the "attacker" a goal, and the "defender" another. The must try to convince/coerce/force/etc the other to their point of view. The drill can be as aggressive as you want, but limited initially to only verbal skills. The early limitation can be seen as a means of blueprinting verbal options and scenarios. As the group gets more comfortable, allow the attacker to start adding in PIA's (shoves, etc.) and more aggressive behavior. You can have the defender respond with continued verbal defusion, to physical control without counters, or to control with counters based on the situation/scenario. Another drill we have used is a variation of the "Pain Stick" concept from Star Trek and the Klingons. As a right of passage, I have students line up in two lines facing each other and one by one they have to walk through the line as their fellow students verbally assault them (no cursing as it is a mixed ages group). Again, aggression in tone is limited at first, and then picks up. I give the students the option of stopping at any point they feel they need to. I make it a point to talk to them in private to see why they stopped if that is the choice. This can be easily adapted to include weapons in attackers hands, and or weapon retention drills among others. Hope this offers an option. Jason
7/3/03 3:14 PM
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Sean Mulligan
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Edited: 03-Jul-03
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 53
Gary, As an LEO, Choice Speach or TAC COM is one of the most important, yet frequently trained force options available to us. Some of the drills that I use to develop this skill from the TCMS library are: - Verbal Assault Drill...this is similiar to ECT in that it subjects the student to verbal stimulus that may attack their emotional arsenal and in turn create interference in the psychological arsenal, preventing access to choice speach of their physical tools. -LARD...this drill assists in developing appropriateness for the student and involves identifying a specific attack, common to their occupation and developing realistic scenarios around the attack to change and introduce different force options, including TAC COM. -BMF(Ballistic Micro-Fights)...this drill involves having the instructor/student identify and isolate a specific sequence in an actual confrontation, and then replicate that sequence so that they may identify the murphy moments and through attrition, develop the appropriate skills to address that moment. These drills can be found on many of TCMS videos including "Rage Attacks", "BMF Models and Drills", "Be a Good Bad Guy"(very important to developing realistic drills and appropriate responses), and "High Gear Dynamic Simmulation Gear: Design, Use, Safety and Drills" to name a few. Additionally, if you visit the site, you'll find an article written by Dr. Cobb on the LARD evolutions. Train hard and stay safe! Sean Mulligan BTS LEO/PDR Training Team sean@tonyblauer.com
7/3/03 4:25 PM
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Flashman
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Edited: 03-Jul-03
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 32
Sean and Jason, Thanks for the responses. This is just the sort of information I'm looking for. I'm a British police firearms and DT instructor and although we view tactical comms as being very important, up to now we have had no drills to actually develop or train it. Jason, in your drill where you give the attacker a goal and the defender another, I presume this is a verbal goal? If so what goals do you actually give? Sean, I'm steadily building up my SPEAR video library, the ones you have mentioned will now be on my "Must Have" list. Thanks again, Gary.
7/7/03 10:02 PM
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JDDynamic
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Edited: 07-Jul-03
Member Since: 26-Mar-03
Posts: 9
Gary, Yes, the goals we give the students are verbal ones. Though you can step it up by having one of them be physically aggressive or beligerent too. The goals could be as simple as wanting to shake their hand, buy them a drink, or more complex like wanting to get their car keys. For LEO use you can modify those to having someone get on the floor in a prone position for cuffing, releasing a hostage, and so on. The goals are up to you, the intent of the drill, the experience and "aggression" of the students. Jason
7/8/03 12:05 AM
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Kerri
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Edited: 08-Jul-03
Member Since: 07-Mar-03
Posts: 9
Good initial question - and great help. Along those lines, does anyone have suggestions for the few that seem to find choice speech funny, because their friend is in class? It's that nervous, embarassing, funny that they can't quite get over. Kerri
7/8/03 10:27 PM
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JDDynamic
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Edited: 08-Jul-03
Member Since: 26-Mar-03
Posts: 10
Kerri, A true story. We had a student of about 13 years old in our school a few years back who was very ticklish. Whenever we worked on self-defense - especially chokes - she would just burst out laughing. To get her over this we ended up attacking her at random intervals in class with chokes. As instructors we made a conscious choice not to talk to her whenever we attacked or she began to laugh. At first she still laughed. Then she began to get annoyed. It progressed into anger, then realization and finally into her reacting ferociously in response as she defended herself. She no longer found the attacks funny. How do we get friends from the class not to smile or laugh? Impossible. Other than a suggestion to pair them up with people they don't know as well, I can't offer any other options. Jason
7/9/03 6:20 AM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 09-Jul-03
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 561
Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
INteresting approach Jason. Kind of an spontaneous & improvised ECT/BMF drill... A word of caution though for anyone reading this forum: The PINK PANTHER/KATO attacking drill can be very dangerous. Note that Jason said INSTRUCTORS did the attacking. This is critical for safety. And at the time Jason want not exposed to ECT or BMF...so likley the same effect or result could have been achieved with drils that permited intensity but also had a safety element built into it. Tony
7/9/03 6:27 AM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 09-Jul-03
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 562
Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
Another thought: Ive had many people of all ages laugh during role- playing...typically its becuase the role-playing istn that believable... Often times its because the concpet was introduced at the subject level vs the substance level. WHY is role-playing so important? WHat can you GAIN, LOSE, LEARN during the pre- contact phase of a REAL fight and how important NOW is CHOICE SPEECH role-playing... etc...most of the time PDR coaches and other instructors inspired by this research just jump into it without connecting the drill to an ambush, the Three P's, the strategy and so on. Its like the traditional tea ceremony vs Snapple: if you dont understand its essence, all you want is the tea, the process is irrelevant and annoying. Reverence for the research and its impact on confidence. Tony
7/9/03 9:54 PM
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GaryK
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Edited: 09-Jul-03
Member Since: 26-Mar-02
Posts: 2
My feeling on verbal--or any other kind of assaults--is this: It's not real unless it's real. When I first began teaching PDR, I was concerned about "age appropriate" behavior and language, but no more. Over time, it frankly became boring, ridiculous and--yes--laughable trying to create "real" scenarios and SD/BG energy with verbal attacks like, "JERK", "DUMMY" and "POOH-POOH CACA HEAD". Its just plain dumb! No. Coach teaches that often it is the language that both immobilizes us and--at the same time--alerts us that real danger is present. To avoid it or try and some how artificially recreate it is to do a HUGE disservice to the system and the student. My approach? Today I set up SD classes in advance, make everyone sign waivers, explain that "real" BG language will be used and, more importantly, why. The result is that we have more interest, more support and more light bulb moments for everyone! MISSION ACCOMPLISHED! Oh, and one side note--NO SPECTATORS--EVER! You either train or you wait outside. Nothing kills momentum or the "mood" like a snicker or a sneer from an on looking parent or peer! For what it's worth... Gary

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