UnderGround Forums
 

Scott Sonnon >> Coaching and Performance


5/3/02 11:06 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
nowaydo
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 03-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 268
 
I was recently criticized for using this coaching strategy. This is what I do. I provide myself as a "talking sparring partner". I spar with my students with about 50-75% resistance. I allow them to somewhat dominate me with offensive tactics or give only about half resistance when they are using defensive tactics. Every once in awhile, I submit them or throw them, just to show them what they are capable of and we do a mini-lesson on the submission or throw I used. As we spar(kickboxing, clinch grappling, boxing or ground engagement), I talk to the student and give him or her little suggestions. Sometimes, even freezing in place to discuss options. Usually, I end the session(grappling only)by giving 100% resistance for only a couple of minutes. I was told I was giving my students false confidence, by not going all out and that I was hurting my own performance by subjecting myself to the "sparring partner syndrome". I know many of us were trained by guys that just "beat the crap out of us" during every session until we got better. Is that really the best training method? Am I hurting my own performance? Robert
5/4/02 8:35 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Neckcranku
4 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02 08:06 PM
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 184
Great post nowaydo! This is exactly how I train as well. I feel better when I coach someone during sparring than 'tapping' the person out. I love to stop when my partner makes a mistake and show him/her what it was or even let them know when I am going for a particular sub or escape just prior to the attempt so that they will learn to see things coming and be 'proactive'. If only my coaches had taught me this way instead of just beating me as fast as possible in order to show their 'superiority' I believe I would have progressed at as much faster rate.
5/4/02 3:21 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
XJD
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 31
nowaydo, It sounds like you're doing a good job. All of my best coaches, including Scott, have trained their athletes in a similar way.
5/4/02 4:21 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 25
Nowaydo, I too coach like that. IMO it depends on your specific goal. If the goal is developing the students, then it is a great way to initiate sparring and fine tune it as well. Lately, I have broken sparring into various components and isolate spar them: pinning, subs, flow subs, positional flow, escapes from positions, escapes from subs, endurance rounds, eyes closed, limit to no hands/one hand/one hand one leg, etc. I spar these isolated, with focus on my performance goals for that session (dictated by the round, i.e. is it pinning? subs? etc.). When my students have some level of competence and confidence in sparring, then we isolate like above and incrementally increase the vigor/resistance. We finish each session with 15-20 straight mins. of RELAXED FULL SPARRING. I have noticed the work isolating the sparring into bite size pieces has accelerated the students sparring abilities exponentially. Every few workouts I have the guys roll in the center and I stop/start them at various positions to point out details to them and the watching class. BTW, there is a local "expert" who derides my class because we train this way. He tells everyone we are "pussies". He has his guys just "get in there and roll". They have a high injury rate, and frankly they suck at grappling. Don't worry about what others think, go about YOUR business and be methodical/scientific and eclectic in your approach. It will pay off. Most guys have an ego that inhibits there full development and they can't fathom why you would train as you do, their issue not yours. Train hard, but smart! Bruce
5/4/02 5:09 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
beauregard
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 36
TTT for training methods.
5/4/02 5:28 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 27
Seamus, call me! We need to hook up to get you the material you wanted. I will try to look up your number, but if it isn't listed and you don't hear from me...call. I am home all night Saturday 5/4.
5/4/02 6:13 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
David Pilkinton
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02 06:59 PM
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 1
Robert, You have asked: "Is that really the best training method?" AND "Am I hurting my own performance?" I have a sneaking suspicion (because of your questions) that you suspect that this may NOT be the best training method and/or you MIGHT be hurting your own performance. I have a comment, based on my experience and research. I find that it is best not to talk while doing physical training, with some exceptions. When used to directly improve some sort of mental attribute of the trainee, talking can be actually an invaluable part of training. For example, consider simulation training for civilian self-defense. Talking is an integral element of this type of training because the vast majority of these type of conflicts start with and/or can be avoided through a verbal exchange; trainees must have the mental toughness and wherewithal to handle the simultaneous verbal and physical demands that will be placed on them in the real thing. There are many other similar scenarios where talking is a necessary part of (mental) training. With these exceptions in mind, talking during training can be a significant hindrance to achieving the zone of optimal performance (and hence skill development). To achieve a state of optimal performance, one's mental state must be a state of synethesizing and integrating internal and external sense data. Talking (esp. "self-talk) interferes by putting one in a state of analyzing. The parts of our brain that want to analyze compete with the parts that want to synethesize/integrate. By talking, we switch to a state where we disallow ourselves to achieve flow (or the state of optimal performance); the more we are out of flow, the more difficult it is to get in flow. Don't get me wrong, analysis is very important for discovering where we need to enhance attributes and improve skills. However, it should be done after the training or competition has taken place, never during. You must find the way to provide the proper environment for your student to achieve flow. (That could mean talking to them while training.) Explore and find your own answers. Some material that might aid in that exploration is the performance spiral material on Fisticuffs tapes. (Also, if you don't have the $$ for the tapes right now, check out "Coaches Guide to Sport Psychology" at your local public library.) David
5/4/02 8:40 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 28
ooops, I re-read the above. I thought he was talking about a coaching session. In COACHING someone, I think talking (to a minimum, at the appropriate junction in the roll) IS valuable. IF you are TRAINING for YOU and your development, then it is the wrong tool at the wrong time. I think I have seen this used as a way to avoid serious rolling...when you get in trouble, turn it into a coaching session (spontaneously). Not saying Nowaydo is doing this, just a general observation. Sorry for not reading the post thoroughly, my sons were attacking me with their light sabers! Bruce
5/4/02 10:37 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
nowaydo
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 273
They are not talking, for they are going 100 percent. I'm talking, but "ONLY" when they hit a barrier(they don't know what to do or they are doing the wrong thing)and it's very brief. Watch the Sabers, Bruce! Thanks, guys.
5/5/02 9:44 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
tysaw
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 29
Nowaydo, that's what we do too. I think it is a great way teach people how to spar. How many times have you heard a new person say they don't know what to do when....Too late on the light sabers, my 4 year has taken me to the death star and I am now awaiting my fate (after he finishes his breakfast!). :-)
5/5/02 11:40 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Ausgepicht
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-May-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 58
TTT for some brilliant coaching!!

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.