UnderGround Forums
 

TMA UnderGround >> MMA gloves in TMA class?


2/15/04 10:48 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Joey Crawford
81 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 15-Feb-04
Member Since: 08/23/2002
Posts: 3882
 
Some of the guys I used to do some Shorin Ryu karate with were wanting me to come up on a weekend and show them some of the things I've learned since starting kickboxing/BJJ, especially the BJJ. Anyhow, these guys aren't the stereotypical TMA dodes, they are actually big fight fans who don't have the resources to train in anything else. When I do get to work out with them, the sparring session go like this: Everyone fights everyone to 5 in a point sparring match to warm-up, then either 2x2 or one three minute round of not balls out, but solid contact sparring w/leg kicks and take downs. So would the padding of MMA gloves be pretty fair if they are using regular Century karate gear? Generally one would use what everyone else is using, but I hate those things. Also, anyone know what to cover in one afternoon (probably 3 hours or so) just to show someone the basics of BJJ? I've only got about 6 months experience(well, actually 9-10 with about a three month layoff), so I know enough to fill up the three hours but I don't want ot teach them (or myself) any bad habits. Thanks.
2/16/04 12:52 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
RapidAssault
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 16-Feb-04
Member Since: 08/02/2003
Posts: 71
Well sure, MMA gloves would be appropriate if you weren't going to make heavy contact (you do know that those gloves won't do much to protect your training partner's face, right?). Then again, most "martial arts gloves" were designed for light contact. Just as long as you don't go heavy on the punching (otherwise, I would suggest you guys to go with boxing gloves instead). As for the ground game, I would work the guard game first, then progress up to the other "dominant positions," and then include the clinch at the end (if there is time). The reason to start with the guard is because this position is perhaps the most "neutral" of ground fighting positions. You could teach a number of sweeps, escapes, submissions, and passes from here; plus, the training wouldn't be so "one sided" (i.e. one partner is the one always making the submission, while the other always seeks to escape -- or gets tapped). Also, I assume that ground fighting is somewhat "foreign" to your friends. Thus, if they started at a spot that is unfamiliar (I mean, how many striking arts even utilize anything remotely resembling the guard?) then any old habits picked up from their previous training would make the least impact on their current training. That is why I would suggest keeping the clinch out of it until the very end. And for that matter, I wouldn't worry about things like "ground and pound." Anyways, since you have three hours, I would suggest you utilize as much time training the guard game and a bit with the mount. Add side mount if you have the time. A couple of sweeps and passes would be a good start. Submissions comes only when proficiency in sweeping and passing are obtained. As for the mount position, make sure your friends are able to hold mount position, as well as making escapes from the bottom. Add submissions when they are able to hold mount as well as escaping from it. Keep your lesson simple. First learn how to move around, then add the "cool, killer techniques." If you don't get around to everything, no sweat. Just make sure your friends are able to use some of the stuff they learned by the end of those 3 or so hours.
2/16/04 5:49 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Joey Crawford
81 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 16-Feb-04
Member Since: 08/23/2002
Posts: 3891
Guess I'll just go with the karate gloves then, we go fairly hard sometimes. Or I could try to get them to go full-contact with headgear and boxing gloves, I don't know.
2/20/04 5:52 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
NowhereMan22000
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 20-Feb-04
Member Since: 08/05/2001
Posts: 471
"Also, anyone know what to cover in one afternoon (probably 3 hours or so) just to show someone the basics of BJJ? " IMO the most important thing to get across is the importance of positions. Most newbies I have rolled with have absolutely no clue or gameplan and have no idea what a good or bad position is until they are in it. So teach them the mount (preferable), cross-side and scarf holds (next best), and guard (if you have to be on your back, be here). At least when they go to the ground they'll have an idea of what position to end up in. If they know after 3 hours that then they're well ahead. Their strikes will finish fights from those positions. Second, teach them how to escape from pins (especially headlock on the ground) to a better position from which, again, their strikes will finish the fight. This is a reverse order to the typical BJJ progression, but it only applies to a single 3 hour seminar.
2/22/04 12:11 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Joey Crawford
81 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 22-Feb-04
Member Since: 08/23/2002
Posts: 3915
That's kinda what I was thinking. These guys know quite a few subs, believe it or not that's where I learned the armbar, and they know the names of positions from watching fights, it's just the going from position to position and setting up the subs they want to learn. Whenever I get a chance to work out with them again I'll let you guys know how it went.
3/29/04 7:03 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
JRSFITNESS1
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 29-Mar-04
Member Since: 05/17/2001
Posts: 826
I recently attended a martial arts tournament here in Colorado. They do all the traditional kata stuff, point sparring, weapons forms, etc. Also, they have a grappling division. In the young kids grappling division the kids are not allowed to do submissions. Instead they just get points for securing certain positions for 3-4 seconds. One of the things that really stood out with even 6-7 year old kids is how this form of training made them have GREAT trainsitions. It's one thing to teach someone a position, but it's an entirely different class on how to get from one good position to another if you cannot secure a submission from the current position. So, I'd concentrate on not just showing the positions, but also how to get to the next position. Best in Health and Training, J. R.
4/11/04 4:16 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Joey Crawford
81 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 11-Apr-04
Member Since: 08/23/2002
Posts: 4138
Awesome. If I have time I may ask them to show me some of the throws and stuff they do, kind of a trade off. Hopefully we'll get to get together sometime soon so I can tell everyone about it.

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.