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Japan UnderGround >> teaching english in japan?


3/2/04 11:00 PM
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grambo
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Edited: 02-Mar-04
Member Since: 03/10/2003
Posts: 384
 
I was told on the Judo forum that it's possible for an American to get a job, with only a b.a. or b.s. under his belt, in Japan teaching English. Does anyone have knowlege about this, or know where i can go to get more information?
3/4/04 10:35 AM
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lautaro
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Edited: 04-Mar-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 598
Yes, it is very easy to get a job if you have a degree. A good resource for information is daveseslcafe.com to post questions to experienced teachers. I myself just came from a year of teaching English in Japan and I do not have a degree. Good luck! Lautaro
3/4/04 1:09 PM
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grambo
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Edited: 04-Mar-04
Member Since: 03/10/2003
Posts: 388
sweet, thanks for the link.
3/5/04 10:13 PM
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TheAx
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Edited: 05-Mar-04
Member Since: 12/18/2002
Posts: 136
Whoa...you got an English teaching job in Japan without a degree??? Would it change things if someone were VERY fluent in computers (Linux, Windoze, HTML, PHP, SQL)? Do you know if there are tech-related jobs in Japan where they might want a native english speaker? Aside from that, what level of Japanese do you need to be considered for an English teaching job?
3/6/04 12:27 AM
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lautaro
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Edited: 06-Mar-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 600
TheAx: As a matter of fact, I had several jobs teaching English. Unfortunately, I don't know about tech-related jobs. You could search on the internet for job ads in Japan related to that field and see what you turn up. For teaching English, usually no Japanese is required. Some jobs require differing degrees of ability in Japanese, but the majority don't. The reason is because the students are expected to be speaking in English as much as possible. That said, I personally found it very useful to learn some very basic Japanese so I could help a student along when they got stuck with a particular word or phrase. Hope that helps! Lautaro
4/3/04 10:06 AM
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ShiroRyu
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Edited: 03-Apr-04
Member Since: 09/13/2003
Posts: 105
How is the pay for the job? I heard its expensive to live in Japan.
4/3/04 10:31 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 03-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1775
The pay average for working at a typical conversation school is 250 000yen a month. Many say that Japan is expensive, but if you live and earn here its actually not bad at all. After settling down you can quite reasonably save 100 000yen a month. If you plan to stay more long term and get better connected you can find some really nice teaching jobs and lead a good life.
4/4/04 12:38 PM
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ShiroRyu
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Edited: 04-Apr-04
Member Since: 09/13/2003
Posts: 112
thanks SILK, I really appreciate it. I am really interested in living there.
4/4/04 11:59 PM
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Opash
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Edited: 04-Apr-04
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 290
You need to have a degree in order to be able to obtain a working visa. There are many jobs in English conversation schools - who don't require any Japanese, because they want a 100% English speaking environment in class. However, in my opinion these jobs are generally pretty shitty. The schools are owned by large companies who see English as a comodity to sell - you being a method of delivering it. Hours are generally, pretty shitty and you will have long shifts with a big work load. For those interested in regular training would find it difficult due to the work hours. There are of course some pretty nice jobs out there - but they are few and far between.
4/10/04 5:02 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 10-Apr-04 11:01 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1862
I gotta second what Easytarget says. I trained around my schedule(trained up to 9 times a week whike prepping for a tourney). Before teaching I worked in law back home.You wanna talk about long shifts? Teaching is a paid holiday during which I have fun and job satisfaction.
4/10/04 11:10 PM
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SILK
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Edited: 10-Apr-04
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Posts: 1870
Easytarget - still in Japan and hope to stay here for at least another decade or so:) How about yourself?
4/13/04 9:00 PM
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Opash
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Edited: 13-Apr-04
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 327
Where are you guys teaching? Who to you work for? Sounds like you have scored for the nicer jobs.
4/17/04 12:41 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 17-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1906
I worked 2 years for Shane English Schools. So the typical late start late finish day(Usually start at either 12 or 1, and get home anything between 9 and 10pm). We had to be at the Schools for the contracted 9 hours. Teaching hours were between 5 and 6 a day(excluding "spring and winter schools which meant an extra 2 hours BEFORE your regular day).Taught anything from 7 to 12 classes a day. While prepping for the All Japan Amateur Shootboxing tourney I used to train before going to work, as well as after work if I got home early enough. And then of course on off days. Before coming to Japan as said I was a lawyer. Wanna talk long hours, huge workload and come home with your brain fried? Now I work 2x a week at University and 2x a week at a kindergarten, and get paid more than at Shane(and get a 3 day weekend:))) My 2 yens worth of advice: get your foot into Japan through a language school - they will get you your visa and you can easily live off the pay. Make friends, but especially with locals and people who have moved on from language schools. Use the school as a stepping stone to learn more about teaching and stuff. Then do your "time" and move on to better options. Study the local language(more job opportunities, especially at higher level abilities). And make sure you enjoy teaching!!! Its not for everybody. But if its for you it is very rewarding and pays well for the actual "work" you really do (I LOVE teaching!)
4/17/04 12:43 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 17-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1907
Hey Easytarget. Its a good life here. How long you been here so far? How is Nagoya? You train there? Man, I am NOT looking forward to japans famous humid summers....but at least the skirts look nice....:)
5/11/04 10:19 PM
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bjjguy
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Edited: 11-May-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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SILK, Have you ever thought about practicing law in Japan? I ask because I am currently in law school, and my fiance is Japanese. We will most likely live in the US, but I'd like to spend a few years in Japan to get to know her family and culture better. Similarly, would it be possible to teach law there instead of English? Brian
5/12/04 5:12 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 12-May-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2136
Easytarget - Nagoya sounds NICE! Whenever I'm not actually injured or in a hospital, I train at Cesars gym in Shootboxing, and then at WK and RJW for submissions. The Uni I work at has an amateur boxing as well as Oly lifting club, so joined that too(heck, its free. why not). Whats your plan for Japan? May I ask what you do? bjjguy - yeah, thought about practising law here(got a Masters in international business law). As a lawyer you would have to pass the bar exams here. There is one big problem to that. Its the same problem to teach law at Uni - your japanese has to be on a VERY high level! The Uni I teach at is actually a law/political science uni. Coming from america your best bet would be to teach something in the form of comparative or international law. But you would still need to know some japanese law. And of course the language barrier. now you could practise law as a consultant-dont need to pass any exams. Especially for a multi national corporation. Havent really delved into that area, as dont know many people there. What some seem to do is to get transferred here by their company back home. If you're still in law school now you have a few years to figure things out and get to know people. It really is ALL about networking. And when is the wedding?
5/13/04 12:24 AM
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bjjguy
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Edited: 13-May-04
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Posts: 299
SILK, Thanks for the advice, if it works out I will most likely work for an American firm with a branch in Japan. I'm also considering doing JAG, but now sure if I feel comfortable joining the Navy, even as a lawyer. As far as teaching, I thought that maybe I could teach at an international school, or somewhere where I could teach in English. I speak very little Japanese, so teaching at a Japanese university in Japanese would be impossible. Of course I'd like to learn, but I would need employment from the beginning. The wedding is scheduled for the last weekend in July, or possibly the first weekend in August. We are going to try to have two small ceremonies, one in the US and one in Japan. I'm hoping the trip to Japan can be worked out. I went for two weeks over my Christmas break to meet her family and had a really good time. Where in Japan are you living? Tokyo? Brian
5/21/04 3:15 AM
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Jack
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Edited: 21-May-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 154
ttt
5/29/04 2:40 PM
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RichardWagner
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Edited: 29-May-04
Member Since: 11/15/2002
Posts: 1309
ttt
6/30/04 4:33 PM
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cycklops
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Edited: 30-Jun-04
Member Since: 04/26/2003
Posts: 751
It can be done without a degree, you just gotta get the correct sponsorship. I would assume the more skills you have (ability to speak Japanese, though not nec. needed, or computers etc.) the better off you are. A friend living there now said they lowered the sponsor amount recently because they're trying to bring in more foreign workers, though I'm not sure that applies to conversational english teachers. I think the sponsorship dropped to a ridiculously low amount around 1200 USD or something. Again, I'm simply going on my experience and what I was recently told. I could be way off but if I'm right, there's an opportunity out there somewhere. -Karl
7/7/04 12:11 AM
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vodka7
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Edited: 07-Jul-04 12:07 AM
Member Since: 06/25/2002
Posts: 342
I just got hired with the JET Programme and am wondering if anybody has ever been to Oyabe, Toyama City, Takaoka, or Kanazawa? These are all close to Oyabe , which is only about 30, 000 people. I am wondering how these cities are for nightlife and also MMA training? Any info greatly appreciated.
7/24/04 11:34 PM
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sekiya
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Edited: 24-Jul-04
Member Since: 11/26/2002
Posts: 199
I agree with SILK get a work visa with a language school and get you work visa in Japan. Yeah, the hours will hold back some training a bit. I didn’t really get to train more than 2-3 times a week until I started working at non-Eikaiwa schools. Make as many friends as you can with locals and learn their culture as well. Once you have your own network, other employment opportunies will happen. Whether you want to be or not, you’re an ambassador from your country and should try to share every positive aspect of our culture with people from Japan. As I see it, anyone can learn a language-in fact, every Japanese studies English in public schools. The seven years I spent there were awesome. I still have many friends to train BJJ and Shooto whenever I visit….as well as in-laws. I got married when I was over there!
8/6/04 11:30 PM
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Byron Whitesides
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Edited: 06-Aug-04
Member Since: 04/26/2002
Posts: 3622
I used to teach English in Japan at a rate of $50 USD per hour. It can be more expensive that that though. Someone I knew was teaching groups and individuals, 6 days a week. She made about $15,000 per month. Byron
8/25/04 8:07 PM
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Peare
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Edited: 25-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 693
Is it possible at all to go over and teach English for a 4 month period only? I would be mid way through University, no degree of course. Some knowledge of Japanese hopefully. Basically I want to do something interesting for the summer while getting a sense of Japan since I may want to live there in the future. Does this sound unreasonable? Also, how easy is it to teach in Tokyo specifically, as opposed to not being picky about location.
8/26/04 12:31 AM
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Opash
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Edited: 26-Aug-04
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 622
You can make a HELL of lot more teaching English in Hong Kong/Taiwan than you can in Japan.

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