UnderGround Forums
 

Japan UnderGround >> teaching english in japan?


10/21/04 9:35 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
TAFKAS
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 21-Oct-04
Member Since: 05/07/2002
Posts: 351
"You can make a lot more teaching in Hong Kong/Taiwan than you can in Japan." Care to elaborate?
1/17/05 1:51 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mestregruber
110 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 17-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 792
It's true that rates are now higher in HK than in Japan. Don't count on getting an English teaching job here without at least a Bachelor's degree, although there is a new law that will allow college students to get temp teaching work here while working on their degrees. As this is a new law, not sure exactly how it works. That said, best in terms of time off, decent pay for just out of uni, plenty of time to train, and little responsibility has to be the JET programme.
2/23/05 10:58 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Crazyfoo
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 23-Feb-05
Member Since: 08/28/2002
Posts: 10865
"My 2 yens worth of advice: get your foot into Japan through a language school - they will get you your visa and you can easily live off the pay." So how exactly can someone go about doing that?
2/23/05 11:04 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Crazyfoo
2 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 23-Feb-05
Member Since: 08/28/2002
Posts: 10866
At the present time I only have a HS diploma,what exactly are my chances of getting my foot in the door?
2/24/05 3:38 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Tball
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 24-Feb-05
Member Since: 09/18/2002
Posts: 134
"I would be mid way through University, no degree of course. Some knowledge of Japanese hopefully." I think you only need two years of unversity to teach part-time with a company like Nova. Get a working holiday visa and you can stay up to a year.
2/24/05 9:24 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mestregruber
110 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 24-Feb-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 844
I would say the chances of getting a job without a uni degree are slim to none. There are a lot of jobs, but there are also a lot of people willing to work with at least some crappy Creative Writing degree or something. The government is now in the process of allowing college students to teach while on holiday here. Other than that there is no holiday working visa for Americans, but you can always work under the table, IF you have contacts. Most people will probably be reluctant to hire you without any qualifications, though. Qualifications are everything in Japan. A HS diploma is NOT a qualification.
2/28/05 11:14 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
judo-bjj-dvd.com
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 28-Feb-05
Member Since: 09/28/2004
Posts: 366
judo-bjj-dvd.com
opash is correct about taiwan; it is WAY better for saving money. i am working on my fifth year here so i am qualified to speak on this subject. $15k/mo = $180k US/year = impossible: don't believe that hype...and btw, degrees are REQUIRED by law here and in Japan; people get away with it for sure, but it's still illegal.
3/1/05 10:48 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
markffd
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 01-Mar-05
Member Since: 10/20/2002
Posts: 827
So teaching in Japan is not a good way to save money? I thought I would be able to pay off some of my university debts by taking this sort of job. But even if I can save more money in South Korea or Taiwan, I'd still go to Japan. Just for all the oppertunities to learn & watch fighting sports.
3/1/05 10:49 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Opash
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 01-Mar-05
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 1227
Also it might be obvious but teaching is a profession and not just a way of making money. If you do not have a genuine interest in teaching, then you may not have great time and also be wasting the time of the students in the place you work. On the visa thing: I have known people work in Asia with on the wrong visas and shady qualifications in the past. But, once they were discovered they were in for a whole world of hassle.
3/8/05 2:43 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Byron Whitesides
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 08-Mar-05
Member Since: 04/26/2002
Posts: 4642

I taught for a Japanese firm called 7 ACT.

4/2/05 7:03 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Rox19
493 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02-Apr-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 458
Yes, actually...has anyone ever tought for Berlitz? I heard some negative things about it from one of my professors, but he knew about it from like 15 years ago...
4/2/05 7:23 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Sangaku
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02-Apr-05
Member Since: 05/23/2002
Posts: 239
I haven't heard anything bad from the few people I know that have worked for them.
4/2/05 10:41 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
SILK
5 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 02-Apr-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 5531
Although Berlitz is still a conversation school like the others, it has one of the better reputations amongst them. They used to focus more on adults and business, but like all the other businesses, they now focus more on kids too (thats where the money is). At the end of the day, regardless of who you work for, it's largely up to you what you make of it here (Of course your boss can be a REAL shithead making your life a misery, but the same could happen back home)
4/10/05 9:25 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mestregruber
110 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 10-Apr-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 891
ROX>Berlitz has a relatively good reputation, like SILK said. Also, the fact that they are represented internationally means that there is some consistency, as opposed to the fly-by-nights that you find all over in Japan. Anyway, if you don't like it that much, stick it out for a year and then you will still have a working visa and you can get a job anywhere in Japan.
4/25/05 6:50 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
gakami
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 25-Apr-05
Member Since: 04/07/2003
Posts: 14126
in the "Training in Japan info please" thread, people were saying that putting in a preference for tokyo or kyoto (or any big city) is a waste of time when applying for JET because you will just not get it. why is that? is the turnover in big cities much smaller? do most JET ppl tend to stay longer in the job in big cities? of course most ppl applying for JET would prefer to be in those big cities but surely if you put in a preference is better than not putting in a preference at all?
4/25/05 9:44 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Opash
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 25-Apr-05
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 1430
Part of the the bullshit behind the JET programme is the need for 'internationalization' and 'cultural exchange' in Japan. Well, the the big cities already have all kinds of people running about the place. Whereas the rural areas, smaller towns and villages and the various islands don't. Hence these are the places that 'need internationalizing'. I also think its just the case that the programme doesn't actually have that many placements in the big cities. Obviously its going to be the areas that have trouble getting people to live there that will be the most likely to nominate themselves as a potential placement.
4/30/05 12:02 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
FloridaArm Bar
3 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 30-Apr-05
Member Since: 05/20/2004
Posts: 1133
How is the behavior of the Japanese students in these classes? Are they disrespectful and beligerent like American kids? Does they company put you through any kind of small training course before they throw you out there?
5/4/05 4:10 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Tommy Gunnz
134 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 04-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3364
i keep hearing you need a degree to teach in Japan, but would an Associates degree work? and what about that law they are trying to make where a college student can work for a couple months on holiday how long until that law is passed?
5/5/05 9:57 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Opash
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 05-May-05
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 1454
Japanese schools are like zoo's and make western schools look like a monastary.
5/7/05 8:42 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
FloridaArm Bar
3 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 07-May-05
Member Since: 05/20/2004
Posts: 1214
"Japanese schools are like zoo's and make western schools look like a monastary." Really, so their students are worse behaved? I'm interested to hear how some of the Americans over there handle the discipline.
6/7/05 10:15 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
mestregruber
110 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 07-Jun-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 964
The "studious Japanese schoolkid" was the biggest lie I have ever been fed. They get away with things in class we would never dream of doing in the US. And at the bad schools... damn.
6/8/05 5:44 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
markffd
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 08-Jun-05
Member Since: 10/20/2002
Posts: 866
I want to get a job specifically in Tokyo. How do I secure a job there, while still in Canada?? It seems only the big corporations like GEOS, NOVA, etc are able to get you all the incentives (accomadation, reimbersement of transportation, etc), BUT they can't ensure that you are placed at the destination that you request. What would you guys advise me to do??
6/8/05 8:23 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Opash
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 08-Jun-05
Member Since: 03/14/2002
Posts: 1560
If you are well qualified and/or experienced in teaching, then you shouldn't have (too much trouble) if you contact the board of education or municipal office of the area you wish to work in. Usually they will hold interviews once or twice a year - or if you are desirable, they will find a way to slot you in pretty quickly. If your only skill is being able to speak English, you may have to go with a conversation school (and ask yourself if teaching is really what you wanna do), untill you make some contacts. Japan, just like anywhere (perhaps even more so) is all about who you know, and not particulaly what you know.
6/11/05 8:06 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
FloridaArm Bar
3 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 11-Jun-05
Member Since: 05/20/2004
Posts: 1484
ttt
7/12/05 11:17 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
slowjoe
1 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 12-Jul-05
Member Since: 01/01/2005
Posts: 16
It is possible to save a good amount of money. I've been here almost three years & rent a house with a couple of friends & train 4-5 times a week. Saving money all depends on you. All I spend my money on is of course living expenses, electronics, my girlfriend & training & have managed to save an amount of money that I didnt think I would ever have. Than again I know some guys who have been here for the same time & dont even have the equivalent of 1000 dollars becuz they spend most of their weekends drinking.

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.