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Roy Harris >> Butterfly Guard Arm Drag


4/18/04 10:45 PM
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bdussy5
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Edited: 18-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 383
 
Hello Roy! I see that you're answering some questions right now so I'm going to jump on the opportunity! I have two questions. 1. I train with gi and I was wondering if you could tell me what I need to do to control from the butterfly guard. I usually have both feet hooked in thighs, my right arm is in his right collar (thumb out) and my left hand is planted a little behind my body (like Joe's sitting guard, only with hooks in). 2. Can you describe how you like to do the armdrag from this guard? Say I was dragging his right arm, do I need to remove my left hook first? If I miss the drag, should I go for the single leg? Any help here would be awesome. Thanks!
4/20/04 2:19 AM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 20-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 991
To answer your questions: To control from any guard, you need to accomplish the following: 1. Establish and maintain control over the opponent's upper torso. 2. Establish and maintain control over the opponent's arms. 3. Establish and maintain control over the opponent's head. 4. Keep the opponent occupied with off-balancing and limb entanglement. 5. Keep your feet active against his hips, thighs, knees, shins and feet. 6. Keep your knees busy against his hips, abs, ribs, shoulders and biceps. 7. In addition to the above, you will need to attack his balance, neck and arm (in that specific order for the gi). Regarding your question about performing the arm drag, you do not need to remove your hooks before, during or after you start the arm drag. The arm drag can be performed independent of any leg work. If you miss the arm drag, try for an underhook. Do not shoot for a single leg unless the opponent lifts his head AND upperbody up off the mat. Practice the above for a minimum of four hours before you spar with it. Then give this a whirl in sparring and let me know how you do. I REPEAT, do not try this stuff until you have put in a minimum of four hours of disciplined/focused training on each of the above mentioned areas. Doing so will jeopardize your effectiveness in the long run! Good training to you, Roy Harris
4/23/04 7:42 PM
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sovann
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Edited: 23-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3528
"Practice the above for a minimum of four hours before you spar with it. Then give this a whirl in sparring and let me know how you do. I REPEAT, do not try this stuff until you have put in a minimum of four hours of disciplined/focused training on each of the above mentioned areas. Doing so will jeopardize your effectiveness in the long run!" Roy do you mean four hours practicing #1-7 establishing control or four hours drilling the arm drag? In what ways does one jeopardize effectiveness in the long run? Developing bad habits? Using too much strength vs technique?
4/23/04 10:08 PM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 23-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1009
sovann, I mean, putting a minimum of four hours of training in on each individual piece mentioned above. You asked, "In what ways does one jeopardize effectiveness in the long run?" Here's how it usually happens: 1. A student takes a private lesson. He or she wants to focus on a particular topic. 2. He or she then goes back to their academy and "tries out" the new info. It works once or twice, until the opponent figures out a counter. 3. The student signs up for another lesson and tells me "the techniques you showed me last time don't work." 4. I "verbally" corner the student into telling me the following: A) they practiced the technique five or ten times during their lesson, and B), they did not practice the techniques after they left, and C) they were curious to find out if the information worked without putting any time or effort into training it. So, because the student tried out the info before really commiting it to muscle memory, they shared it with everyone who was watching or rolling. And now that a few people have figured out a counter to the technique, but the student himself does not know how to counter the technique, he is left cold and dry. He now has to ask how to counter the counter. If he had put in the necessary time, he would have found out the counters himself and would have figured out a counter to the first counter that most people will figure out on their own. Does that makes sense? I could write more, but I have to go now. Take care, Roy Harris
4/24/04 7:08 PM
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sovann
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Edited: 24-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3532
Roy, I see! Thanks! [sends email to training partner with request to do more reps and work on this]
4/24/04 11:58 PM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 24-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1014
sovann, Those that have followed my advice for a period of two to three months have noticed A TREMENDOUS improvement in their FEEL for the game! Some have even noticed a higher awareness to pressure and distance! Roy Harris
4/25/04 3:55 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 25-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2129
Roy, Once again you have spoken the truth. And again I restate that what you're saying isn't "new" or hasn't be said before. I know alot of people have criticized Rorion over the years BUT he did make the very same point (more or less) you just made. I think it all comes down to how people perceive Martial Arts. Many people believe "knowing" is the exact same thing as "doing". Many people believe that all they have to do is have some one "show" them how to do something and that, in and of itself, will be enough for them in regards to them "doing" it. One thing Rorion on his tapes series would say and emphasis is the importance of repetition and practice. Alot of people would "sleep" on that very true and important infor.

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