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AcademicGround >> Need Help with physics and math!!


4/21/04 4:31 PM
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ScrumDude
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Edited: 21-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 18
 
This is a project for my maths 335 class, and I need some serious help! Any help is much appreciated, anyone who solves the whole problem, I'll pay for a pro membership. A pitcher is releasing a ball at a height of 11 feet 8 inches above the plate from a horizontal distance of 60 feet 6 inches. He releases the ball with an initial velocity, Vo, at a positive angle alpha below the horizontal. In order to be a strike, the ball must end up below the batter's belt buckle and above his knees. The batter's knees are one foot above the ground and his belt buckle three feet above the ground. 1. Find the range of values for the angle alpha which will result in the pitcher throwing a strike. 2. Choose an angle alpha which will force the ball to cross the plate at an elevation of three feet. Find the speed of the ball when it crosses home plate, the time it takes for the pitch to reach home plate, and the arc length for the pitch. Determine the components of the velocity vector as the ball crosses the plate. (No air resistance is taken into account, but gravity is) 3. If the pitcher throws a waish high strike, the batter will hit the ball at an angle gamma above the horizontal. The initial velocity of the batted ball is Ho. The left field wall in Fenway Park is 318 feet from home plate and is 38 feet high. If the ball goes over the wall, it will be a home run. Assuming the pitcher throws a strike, will the batter hit a home run? 4. If the batter does not hit the ball over the wall, the left fielder will try to catch the ball. Place the coordinate axes at the center of home plate with the y-axis on the third base line, the x-axis on the first base line, and the z-axis straight up and down through home plate. Measuring position in units of feet, the left fielders glove is at coordinates (30,200,5). The glove stays at a constant elevation of 5 feet. The initial position of the baseball is (0,0,3). Assume the ball is hit at an angle Beta from the third base line. When the ball is hit, the left fielder will move in a straight line directly to the position where he will catch the ball five feet above the ground. The direction of the left fielder takes to get to the ball can be expressed in angle Beta measured from the relationship of his direction to the left field line. Determine the minimum speed at which the left fielder must travel to get to the ball before it drops below 5 feet. Assume the maximum speed of the left fielder is 20 miles per hour. Will the left fielder catch the ball? Choose reasonable values for Vo,Ho,Gamma,Beta to produce (i)a home run, (ii) a catch, (iii) neither.
4/22/04 8:11 PM
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Todd82
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Edited: 22-Apr-04
Member Since: 07/22/2003
Posts: 1664
Go find worked solutions of projectile type problems in a physics textbook and use the same formulae.
4/23/04 1:29 PM
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Mozilla
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Edited: 23-Apr-04
Member Since: 05/14/2002
Posts: 2935
do you still need a solution? I want that pro membership
4/23/04 4:30 PM
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MCC
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Edited: 23-Apr-04
Member Since: 12/11/2002
Posts: 2027
draw the problem out, with two pitches going through the batter and into the ground. one pitch should go through waist-high on the batter (3 feet) the other pitch at knee height (one foot). you'll get two right triangles. now draw lines connecting the ground at the batter's feet that connect to either the one-foot mark or three-foot mark. use these new smaller right triangles to determine your alpha angle range for strikes. the rest of the questions I'll leave for others...
4/24/04 12:25 AM
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ScrumDude
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Edited: 24-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 24
Still looking for a real solution, although working on it for 4 hours yesterday the only solutions I've got have about 3 variables in them. I've got the first part done, that was fairly easy. You do have to realize, however, that gravity does affect the path of the ball. We can't just look at the ball's path as a straight line, because the gravity is going to drag the ball down just a bit. That is why we have to find the arclength of the pitch. Pro membership offer still stands...I'm working on a solution as we speak. Thanks for your help guys! The Dude
4/25/04 7:29 PM
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marck
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Edited: 25-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3005
LOL! You'd be better off taking this to the the OG.
4/26/04 3:39 PM
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goph94
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Edited: 26-Apr-04
Member Since: 12/27/2002
Posts: 469
I'm on it.
4/29/04 4:14 PM
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ScrumDude
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Edited: 29-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 25
Contest is over folks. I gave the 45-minute presentation over it yesterday. It went fairly well, anyone wanting solutions let me know. Thanks for any work you guys did! The Dude
4/30/04 10:51 AM
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Mozilla
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Edited: 30-Apr-04
Member Since: 05/14/2002
Posts: 2966
please post solution. I am embarassed to say it stumped me. *hangs head in shame*
5/7/04 10:08 AM
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goph94
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Edited: 07-May-04
Member Since: 12/27/2002
Posts: 476
Me too - I'm afraid the intricacies of projectile motion now elude me. I guess it really has been too long...
6/14/04 9:44 PM
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AndrewDoe
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Edited: 14-Jun-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 429
This is Math 335? Where do you go to school? This is applied mathematics with some multivariate calculus. Is this a dually listed Math/Physics course?
6/15/04 7:10 AM
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qeySuS
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Edited: 15-Jun-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4218
I tried this when i first saw it, i could make some formulas but basd on the variables given i couldn´t get a final answer :/

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