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Roy Harris >> Roy: Armbar grip question


4/25/04 7:28 AM
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jonpall
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Edited: 25-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4552
 
There are two very common ways to do the "cross-grip-hip-post" armbar from the guard (I just came up with that name for the sake of reference). In both of them, you put a foot on the hip to spin and use your, say, right hand to grab behind your opponent's right tricep (your right thumb points down). You want to armbar your opponent's right arm. But those two armbars differ as follows: In one of them, your left hand grabs your opponent's right wrist and in the other one, your left hand grabs behind your opponent's left shoulder. Although, many may not agree with me, I have the feeling that one of those armbar techniques might be just a little bit more high percentage than the other. If you or anyone reading this has an opinion on which one it is, or just want to disagree with me and say that all techniques are equal, please make a note of it and include a decent argument. Also make a note of if you think there is any difference between doing those techniques with and without the gi and also in an MMA situation. I do only no-gi grapplig, by the way. This is what I personally think are the pros and cons of each method: - When you grab behind the shoulder you can better hold your opponent in that "middle" range in which he's not too far and not too close to be armbarred. It may also be a bit easier to spin this way. - When you grab the wrist you have a stronger pull on the arm to keep your opponent's elbow in that armbar "danger zone", i.e. above your stomach. His arm will also be nearly extended once you get your leg over his head (although this might not be totally true if you have to push his head away with your left hand at the last moment to get your leg over his head). I personally think that this latter type of armbar might be a bit more high percentage because my 2 biggest problems with those "cross-grip-hip-post" armbars is that a) my opponent pulls the arm away and b) I fail to extend the arm once I get my leg over his head. I'm a little bit worried about doing this armbar against guys that lean far back, but I have been told that doing that shouldn't really stop the armbar, if you're good at it. Thanks in advance, jonpall.
4/25/04 10:11 PM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 25-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1018
jonpall, Both methods of performing this arm lock are good. Both have pros and cons. One is not better than the other (for everyone that is). However, there are times when one is better than the other (this is really dependent upon body type and comparative abilities). Now, one last point: If you are at the purple belt level, your focus should not be on finishing the lock every time. Rather, you should focus on learning to follow. For example, so what if your opponent pulls his arm out, you should follow up immediately with a sweep, triangle, omo plata or straight arm lock. if you find it difficult to extend the arm once the leg is over, put your opponent on his back instead. The goal of the purple belt should be to learn how to put the basics together into simple combinations. All of the basics, when countered, lead back to basics. Combinations is the key. If you are still at the blue belt level, this is something you should keep in mind for the next belt level. If you are still at the blue belt level, focus more on your mechanics in relation to your timing. Good training to you, Roy Harris
4/26/04 5:30 AM
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jonpall
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Edited: 26-Apr-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4553
Thanks, Roy.

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