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8/2/04 12:47 PM
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Arbornne
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Edited: 02-Aug-04 12:33 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 283
 
I am a Canadian student. I have finished an honours undergraduate degree and I am half way through my Masters of Science in Biochemistry. I scored Verbal Reasoning: 10 Physical Science: 13 Biological Science: 12 Writing Sample: M However, my GPA is below 3.6 if my grad school marks are not considered. I need advice on how to apply for American schools and would like an indication of what my chances are at some of the schools available to Canadians. Thanks
8/8/04 9:55 PM
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mtan2
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Edited: 08-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 115
First of all, let me say that those are really good MCAT scores. I am not sure how your grades in graduate school will factor in to the equation, as I came into med school straight out of undergrad. As you probably know, they will be a determining factor but I do not know how they will be weighted as compared to undergrad. An undergrad GPA of just under 3.6 is still fairly competitive. From what my Canadian classmates tell me, it is very difficult to get into med school in your country, because there are so many applicants for relatively few slots. The same problem exists in the United States. There is a book (MSRA I think) published by the american association of medical colleges that gives a brief introduction and statistics on every MD program in the US (and I believe Canada as well). From what I can recollect, most US schools had very few if any foreign students. The book is available through aamc.org, but your university career counseling center may have a copy. Given your numbers, if you were a US student, I would say that you stand a pretty decent chance at a US school(not counting your extracurricular activities and interviewing skills). As a Canadian, I do not know how your standing would be. Apply for the US schools at www.aamc.org take the link to the AMCAS form to start your application for the US schools. I would also highly recommend applying to osteopathic (DO) or foreign medical schools as a backup. When I applied, I turned in applications to 28 US schools. I was interviewed at 4. I did not get into a single one. In a last-ditch effort, I applied to a foreign school (SGU) and was accepted. You may question the quality of education at foreign schools... and that is fair enough. I cannot speak for other foreign schools, but at my school we are pushed hard. The pass rate for the American boards speaks for itself. I just got my step one board scores in the other day and I am very happy with it. Oh yeah, there are lots of Canadian students there too. Good luck and if you have any more questions, I'll be lurking around.
8/9/04 11:41 PM
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Arbornne
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Edited: 09-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 297
Thanks mtan2. I'm working on the AMCAS applications now. I have applied to 14 schools so far (might add more) and they all consider Canadian students. Of course I don't know the % of their incoming year are international students. Canadian schools are much harder to get into you are right. Where are you attending school? If you don't mind sharing your stats (MCAT, GPA, etc.) that would be great.
8/15/04 8:17 PM
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mtan2
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Edited: 15-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 117
No prob... When I applied, I had a 3.55 GPA. My MCAT scores were verbal 10, physical 11, bio 11. I'm not too sure how I would rate my interviewing skills, I just tried to walk in to the interviews being polite, honest and having thought about (but not rehearsed) responses to common questions. For extracurriculars I did a year of research and a year of volunteering at the university hospital. Right now I'm a 3rd year student at St. George's University. The first 2 years are in the Caribbean at the campuses on the islands of Grenada and St. Vincent. In about a week, I start clinical rotations in NY. Most of my school's affliate hospitals for clinical rotations are in Brooklyn, NY and in NJ.
8/16/04 9:26 PM
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Arbornne
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Edited: 16-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 302
Wow those are pretty good scores. It's hard to believe you only had 4 interviews.
9/15/04 10:11 PM
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deshedeepak
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Edited: 15-Sep-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 528
mtan2-- you had good grades, you should have applied again to us schools. i know plenty of people who didn't have grades as good as yours who are going to good us schools. arborne-- your mcat is very good. you shouldn't have any problem getting into a canadian school i would think. i did some research a while and almost every canadian med school accepts a greater percentage of their applicants than do the vast majority of us med schools. from what i understand, because medical reimbursements to physicians are capitated on an annual basis, doctors don't make as much money in canada as they do in the us, therefore fewer people are interested in medicine in canada than in the usa. this might be why canadians apply to us schools, because acceptance rates a canadian schools are significantly higher. that said, i can't comment on your chances at getting into a us school. if you were a us citizen i would tell you that you'd prolly be headed to a top 20 school. good luck to you!
11/12/04 11:46 PM
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MikeSwainFan
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Edited: 12-Nov-04
Member Since: 09/28/2004
Posts: 138
judo-bjj-dvd.com
a 35 on the MCAT is awesome...combined with a 3.6 don't worry at all...two uni friends got in with numbers WAY below those, so dont worry (but they are americans)

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