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AcademicGround >> Attn: Math people


8/11/04 1:11 AM
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RobRPM2222
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Edited: 11-Aug-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 17207
 
what would be a good educational sequence and stuff to check out for learning enough math to do some basic cryptography work? right now I know Calc I, and that's it. by the end of my degree, I will have completed Calc I-III, Probabilty and Mathmatical Statistics I-II, and the CS Math courses like CS Discrete Math, Theory of Computability, etc. I would like to be a whole lot stronger on proofs, I am at very bare basics for that. free Internet resources are preferred, but very good books will be bought as well.
8/11/04 1:45 AM
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Yars
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Edited: 11-Aug-04
Member Since: 02/21/2003
Posts: 42
linear programming was a very good course, so is non linear programming but i didn't do as well in that so i didn't really like it
9/1/04 2:25 PM
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cloudstepper1
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Edited: 01-Sep-04
Member Since: 05/14/2004
Posts: 35
If you take any kind of programming, it can help out. Have read "The Codebreakers?" It's a huge book, but definitely worth reading. Gives a great history and focuses on most aspects of codes and ciphers. Anything about Lester Hill (of the Hill Cipher fame) is pretty good too, if you can find it. "Codes and Ciphers" is a bit elementary, but it has some useful info in it. In my first year of college, I used to frequent a book called "Computer Cryptography," which had a bunch of cool stuff about programming and the mathematical side of crypto. I'm a math fan myself, and my enjoyment actual started with my interest in crypto. If I were you, I'd just take all the math I could, and as many math-based programming languages as possible. I'm a computer science/business major, and working toward a MBa and Doc. of Divinity.(I know. Weird combo, but I love computers, and I love business, and I love God too, so it just seems right:) That should at least get you started looking toward a cryptographic direction. If you can, try to talk to any member of the NSA's computer crimes department, or the FBI's department of the same name. They are usually more than helpful on stuff like that. Hope that helps. Peace Tony
9/1/04 7:20 PM
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Andrew Yao
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Edited: 01-Sep-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2245
http://www.math.gatech.edu/%7Ecain/textbooks/onlinebooks.html Look into graph theory too, there's a book on that list but I don't know if it's any good. Knowing how to do, say, Dijstkra's algorithm, is an advantage.
9/2/04 1:30 AM
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RobRPM2222
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Edited: 02-Sep-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 17603
thanks guys!
9/2/04 3:16 PM
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Andrew Yao
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Edited: 02-Sep-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2248
Er, that is graph theory is good for CS in general, especially networking, but probably not so much for crypto.
9/5/04 1:05 AM
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RobRPM2222
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Edited: 05-Sep-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 17635
actually, graph theory is highly recommended for cryptanalysis. one of the problems that was proposed for use in public-key crypto, the traveling salesman problem, is all graph theory (IIRC, or was that the knapsack problem?)

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