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FilmmakerGround >> DVD transfer question


11/4/04 10:07 AM
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Steve Loftin
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Edited: 04-Nov-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1297
 
I am interested in producing DVDs using a home video type camera. I can't afford to spend a lot of money so I am looking for a camera for under $1000. I want a good quality picture and sound. The most bang for the buck is great. I am completely new to the "digital" area. I have made smaller home movies using VHS but that is seriously outdated now. I want to get into a more modern area. I know they have digital video cameras and even the camera that uses the actual DVD disc, so here are a few questions that I have. What type of camera is best used for this process? Can a standard DVD recorder be used to duplicate my movies? When transferring film to a DVD-R/RW or DVD+R/RW, which one is better and why? Will the DVD-R/RW or DVD+R/RW discs play in a standard region 1 DVD player? I appreciate the help, y'all. Thanks in advance. Steve
11/4/04 11:03 AM
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Lynn@Renzos
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Edited: 04-Nov-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 7475
Wow...that's a mouthful. What you should try to get is a 3 CCD camera if possible. Panasonic has some solid cameras at a lower price point. It also depends on what you are trying to shoot. Give us that and I am sure we can help you more. Yes a standard DVD recorder can if you are wanting to not create anything other than DVD +/-R DVDs. The DVD-R plays in most standard DVD players, more so than the +R. I think you mean transfer from video to DVD not film, correct?
11/6/04 9:02 AM
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Steve Loftin
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Edited: 06-Nov-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1298
Lynn, Thanks for the help. I am wanting to transfer from video to DVD. I am interested in filming sporting events with this camera. Different things such as, football games, wrestling, basketball, etc. So the camera will not be set up on a tripod the whole time. I need something that can follow the action fairly well. How would I go about creating actual DVD Video discs instead of DVD-Rs? Steve
11/6/04 9:36 AM
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Lynn@Renzos
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Edited: 06-Nov-04 09:39 AM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 7480
Steve... You have to have a glass master made. There is a real difference between duplication and replication. Check out www.discmakers.com website and order their information package (free). It comes with a DVD and booklet explaining the whole process. It is pretty amazing.
11/8/04 2:51 AM
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djdb
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Edited: 08-Nov-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 5460
"I am looking for a camera for under $1000. I want a good quality picture and sound." Good quality sound has nothing to do with the camera. If you want great sound, get a good collection of microphones, a portable mixer, & the correct direct box/preamp for your camera. That said, it's going to run more than a grand for good sound by itself. However, if you're using your camera mic for the job, you will be consistently disappointed. "I know they have digital video cameras and even the camera that uses the actual DVD disc," Recording direct to DVD is another mistake. DVD uses MPEG-2 video, which is a compressed video format. Direct recording does not allow you to control the compression rates, which are the controlling factor in MPEG quality. This is particularly important for you considering you will often have quick motions that require better compression rates than a static picture like you'd see in a dramatic scene. "What type of camera is best used for this process?" Get the best 3 CCD mini DV camera you can afford. "Can a standard DVD recorder be used to duplicate my movies?" Yes, but the process is slower & the end product will have a measurable failure rate. "When transferring film to a DVD-R/RW or DVD+R/RW, which one is better and why?" Both rewritables (RW) are out as they're more expensive & not as compatible. There is virtually no difference to the end user regarding -R & +R; they are just competing technologies. The primary difference for you is in the long-term cost of the blank media. For a long time, -R was leading in terms of popularity & thus in lower costs, but with the recent presence of dual-layer +R recorders (& no -R dual-layers), +R is now dominating the market. "Will the DVD-R/RW or DVD+R/RW discs play in a standard region 1 DVD player?" Almost all recent & future models can play -R & +R. RW is meant for recorders only, just like CDR & CDRW. Many early players have difficulties with burnt discs, just like CDR. You can expect that you will always have at least one client that will have problems viewing homemade discs. www.videohelp.com is the standard resource for learning about all things DVD. -r PS: Bottom line here is that you shouldn't concern yourself with format while you're shooting. That's an editing issue. DVD will come & go; just shoot your video correctly & it will stand the test of time.
11/8/04 12:20 PM
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Steve Loftin
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Edited: 08-Nov-04
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1307
WOW! Thanks a lot for the help y'all. I really appreciate it. Steve

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