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AcademicGround >> good article on Latin


1/5/05 11:33 PM
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Buddhadev
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Edited: 05-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 874
 
http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig4/colalillo1.html hyperlink Almost inspires my decrepit old butt to try to learn it.
1/6/05 3:23 AM
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SILK
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Edited: 06-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4583
Nice article. I like this part: "Latin can train a person to think in an organized way". When I studied law we had to study Latin for 2 years as part of the course. One of my friends got a job as an attorney. When she asked why they chose her over other candidates, they pretty much used that line. Another reason why with hindsight I appreciated having done Latin: English just makes SO much more sense now! And from Latin languages like Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French and even German are much easier to pic up. Plus once you start seeing how all these languages relate to each other, makes it even easier. It's a pity that so many think of Latin as a dead language that deserves no attention:( It's one of the most mathematical languages out there
1/9/05 10:34 PM
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Buddhadev
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Edited: 09-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 883
SILK, good post. Thanks. Some questions: Did you learn it in high school, college, or both? Does a person have to practice speaking it to get a true appreciation fo the language or is reading/writing good enough?
1/9/05 11:19 PM
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SILK
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Edited: 09-Jan-05
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Posts: 4665
The deal with the uni was that if you did Latin at school (for about 3 years), you only had to do one year of regular latin (Latin 1) at uni. If you had no school Latin you had to do one year as an intensive bridging course (Latin Beginners), then in your second year you do regular Latin as a language. So first year we spent learning all the grammar and as many vocab as we could, translating Asterix and Obelix and other old texts. Second year (Latin 1) was mostly reading, writing, translating. Not much speaking focus apart from when reading loudly. (I failed the first year of Beginners Latin, so in the end did 3 years of Latin lol. No regrets though) I'm sure with speaking practice you would definately appreciate it even more, but with reading/writing you can get a good visual apprectiation (makes it easier to literally see how it relates to modern languages). Further rambling: In Latin, technically, word order can be TOTALLY random. If you say "I live in Japan/Japan I in live/in Japan I live/live I in Japan" in Latin, the meaning will always stay the same ("I live in Japan"). Almost all of Latin is based on the word endings. So its the endings which give the word its place in the meaning, not the word order which gives it its meaning. Once you get used to that its easier to learn foreign languages where the word order is different from English, and languages where you can change the word order but still keep the meaning (Such as Polish or German). Needless to say, Italian, and then SPanish and Portuguese are based off Latin, so these become very easy to learn afterwards (And you've got most of the world covered too). I tried studying Italian for a bit after latin. Was sooo easy all of a sudden. As Latin bases the meaning of words on the word endings, other languages such as German (French too I think, and even Japanese to an extent) become easier to understand while studying (Many English people who study German always bitch about the grammar lol) German has only 4 case ending(I think thats the grammatical name-cant remember) - Nominatief, Akkusatief, Genetief and Datief. Latin has 6. Latin also uses gender in its grammar. Having said that, learning all the Latin grammar is a bit of a bitch. But once you know them it really is like maths. There are set formulas and you stick to them. Very logical/systematic language. sorry for the long post Carpe Diem
1/14/05 10:33 PM
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RobRPM2222
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Edited: 14-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 20318
what about Sanskrit? I've heard that's a hugely mathematical language as well, as well as being interesting to study for it's effects on Indo-European languages.
1/14/05 10:45 PM
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Buddhadev
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Edited: 14-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 889
Rob, I've heard that as well. I can understand smatterings of Sanskrit when it's spoken (mostly in chants/mantras in Hindu religious events) since my parents' Bengali is actually closer to it than Hindi is. BTW, SILK, sorry I didn't thank you sooner for your last post here answering my questions. It is an AWESOME post--maybe the best one I've ever read on the Academic Ground. Thanks!
1/20/05 5:07 AM
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pustak
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Edited: 20-Jan-05
Member Since: 08/13/2002
Posts: 4568
i loved studying Latin, and did so for 5 years. there were 13 students in my highschool who qualified for NMSQT scholarships. all 5 of those in my Latin 4 class were among the 13. Latin is possibly the best study aid available for the verbal portion of the SAT, and of other standardized tests, and is an immeasurable help in language proficiency of all sorts.
1/20/05 6:19 AM
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pustak
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Edited: 20-Jan-05
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Posts: 4569
i also meant to point out the humor inherent in an article that decries the use of imprecise language to support political arguments by unfounded implication and simultaneously implies that a number of political positions are bunkum without supporting that insinuation. nevertheless, an interesting and thought-provoking article.

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