UnderGround Forums
 

Roy Harris >> Immovable Elbow


1/12/05 4:14 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
rene.r
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 12-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4788
 
Please excuse the cheesy Shaw Bros. title. This question comes from another thread, and since you have a gift for breaking down components very analytically and succinctly, I was hoping you'd be kind enough to share your insight: Let's say, when in the guard of someone of higher skill, why is it that they seem able to just take your arm, pull it across, or otherwise do what they want with it while you are fairly helpless to resist, while at the same time, when in their guard, their arms (and posture) seem to tend towards the immovable? What components of their skill are at play to make the situation feel like that? Thanks!
1/18/05 9:19 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
jonpall
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 18-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 6328
My worthless 5 cents before Roy comes here, because I'm bored at work: Hip movement and timing. The better guys have more of it. But you knew that, rene ;) Hip movement because you don't need to actually PULL his elbow across, just hold it in place while you move your hips in the opposite direction. Same results, but works on stronger guys. Timing, because that even if you have hip movement, if you don't have timing, you'll move your hips and pull on the elbow at the wrong time and your opponent can counter. So you need to do the move AS he's moving away from some other attack, say, a "push wrist though" triangle.
1/18/05 4:40 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
rene.r
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 18-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4826
Give a guy one picture in an Icelandic periodical and... Thanks Jonpall! :)
1/20/05 10:35 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
jonpall
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 20-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 6354
Sorry, rene :) Sometimes I just help myself. But these are not my words. I got this answer some time ago for the same question from Matt Thornton if I remember correctly. I'm sure that Roy can answer it better than me, though. Cheers, jonpall.
1/21/05 2:27 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Roy Harris
26 The total sum of your votes up and votes down Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 21-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1196
rene.r., Here's the problem and the solution: "They are more skilled than you." I know that sounds overly simplistic, but it is a true statement. Allow me to turn the tables to illustrate the point from a different perspective: Let's say you have been doing BJJ for seven years. Along comes a new guy named Alex. Alex starts training and enjoys himself. However, he gets frustrated with his training because you keep pulling his arm across centerline and taking his back (your favorite move........a move that you have spent three years developing). he asks for help on the subject, but no matter what you and other tell him, he is still unable to prevent you from taking his back. What is the problem? I think you know the answer, but let me write it so that others KNOW: You have spent the better part of seven years practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. In other words, you have put in a minimum of 2100 hours of training. Alex on the other hand only has less than 200 hours. How can Alex's 200 hours catch up with your 2000+ hours? You and I know the answer to this question: He can't catch up to you in a short period of time. He can close the gap a little each and every year, but to fully catch up with you in such a short preiod of time...............no way. So, since you know that experience counts for something and since you understand that only so much ground can be gained in short periods of time, you have to accept the fact that higher skilled people are going to be ahead of you for some time. You also have to understand that higher skilled people develop personal likes and dislikes over time. What this means is that some people will become really good at triangle chokes.....and no matter who grapples with them, they will always seem to tap everyone with a triangle choke. And then other people will become good at arm locks or leg locks or sweeps. And, when you grapple with them, they will consistently perform their favorite techniques on you. They can do this because they have put in the time! So, yes, I could teach you some things to do against these people, but you must remember AND RESPECT their level of experience. They do what they do because they have so much more experience than you, and, they have a much more intimate knowledge of what they are doing. Does this make sense? Good training to you, Roy Harris
1/21/05 2:26 PM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
rene.r
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 21-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 4843
Thanks Roy!
1/22/05 12:09 AM
Ignore | Quote | Vote Down | Vote Up
Cherrypicker
Send Private Message Add Comment To Profile

Edited: 22-Jan-05
Member Since: 01/07/2003
Posts: 1833
Damnnn!  That was a good response.

Reply Post

You must log in to post a reply. Click here to login.