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TMA UnderGround >> American Jiu-Jitsu


3/14/05 8:06 PM
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shovelhook
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Edited: 14-Mar-05
Member Since: 01/04/2004
Posts: 142
 
This probably shouldn't be in this forum, but I don't know where else to put it. Anyhow, there is a local AJJ dojo, I was wondering what type of carriculum to expect (how does it differ from BJJ(or is it derived from JJJ?), does it focus mainly on submission or does it try to be a complete art, any striking, requirements for each belt, etc. stuff like that). I can study this, or Shinto-Ryu Karate. The AJJ is most likely alot more practical, but both are probably less than hardcore. Doesn't matter, I would like to get some ground fighting training and experience, if for nothing more than a hobby. Besides, anything is better than not training at all. I would rather take Sambo and Muai Thai but these are my only 2 options, living in the middle of nowhere. I was just wondering what you all think of it in American form, and what to expect. I'd like to know before I go sit in on a class.
3/15/05 10:51 AM
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karasu
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Edited: 15-Mar-05
Member Since: 12/30/2004
Posts: 122
It could be anything. American "Karate", "Jiujitsu", etc, is usually the teacher's personal version of the art. Just go check it out, it could be really generic, or could be great, depending on the teacher. Sometimes the best schools are those without the big names and big organizations.
3/17/05 7:28 PM
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FloridaArm Bar
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Edited: 17-Mar-05
Member Since: 05/20/2004
Posts: 823
I have always wondered what "American Jiu Jitsu" was.
3/17/05 11:51 PM
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karasu
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Edited: 17-Mar-05
Member Since: 12/30/2004
Posts: 126
I would speculate that Americans have had quite an influence on "Jiu-Jitsu" as seen in MMA. Not just Americans, but the Russians, Japanese, etc.
4/1/05 4:51 PM
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siouxNYC
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Edited: 01-Apr-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3458
there was an nyc american jj instructor on UG like about a year ago - i asked this very question and he answered it. if i recall correctly, he said it's not about hardcore training, but there are some practical elements.
4/7/05 6:28 PM
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shovelhook
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Edited: 07-Apr-05
Member Since: 01/04/2004
Posts: 150
Thanks that's fine, I'm still interested, it's the best I can do in my area.
4/14/05 6:35 AM
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ObeeOne
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Edited: 14-Apr-05
Member Since: 11/17/2003
Posts: 38
Karasu is absolutely correct. I think American JJ is school specific. There is no particular "founder" in my opinion. Shovelhook - go for it. mat time is mat time. When or if something better comes along (BJJ) then try that.
6/11/05 2:10 AM
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TriangleStrangle
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Edited: 11-Jun-05
Member Since: 01/11/2005
Posts: 49
If it is the AJJ on Long Island, NY they do Japanese jiu jitsu and they also have grappling is Brazilian jIu Jitsu. If your looking for BJJ, and you do in fact live on Long Island, Serra jiu jitsu academy, if not disregard this post
6/14/05 5:47 PM
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shovelhook
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Edited: 14-Jun-05
Member Since: 01/04/2004
Posts: 184
I understand there is a section on it in one of the "poor Man's James Bond" books I still haven't checked it out...this week definately though

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