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AcademicGround >> Help Me Choose a Math Elective


5/16/05 7:54 PM
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jgibson
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Edited: 16-May-05
Member Since: 04/30/2001
Posts: 5394
 
Alright, I am an EE student and need one more math class in the fall for a Math minor. I am looking for a class that will complement my EE studies. Here are some of my choices: 1. Complex Analysis (study of complex variables, differentiation and integration complex functions, intro to Riemann surfaces) 2. Applied Differential Equations II (basically it focuses on boundary value problems, power series solutions, intro to PDE's) 3. Number Theory 4. Vector Analysis--Modern vector methods with applications for students of mathematics, physics, and engineering. 5. Statistics for Engineering and Scientists II (point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, experimental design, analysis of variance, multivariable experiments, nonparametrics, statistical quality control, and computer applications) 6.Discrete Mathematics Topics in discrete mathematics, including propositional logic, sets, relations, inverse functions, divisibility, induction, recurrences, inclusion exclusion, permutations, combinations, graphs, graph coloring, and applications. 7. Boolean Algebra (4) Axiomatic treatment of Boolean algebras, finite Boolean algebras, representation theorems. Introduction to partially ordered sets and lattices. Transfinite induction, Zorn's lemma. Applications to logic and switching circuits.
5/16/05 11:48 PM
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Revolver of Reason
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Edited: 16-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 23537
I don't think it will compliment EE.. but I would pick this - 3. Number Theory
5/17/05 1:45 PM
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Dogbert
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Edited: 17-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 14808
The Boolean Algebra course looks a little bit too theoretical. I love this stuff, but I´m not sure it is of much use in applied areas. I guess 1,2,4,5 would be the best picks.
5/17/05 3:58 PM
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MO-HOLLYWOOD
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Edited: 17-May-05 04:00 PM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 186
Depends on what your interests are. #7 would be very good if your interested in advanced digital systems, logic design, vlsi, and things of that nature #'s 1,2,5 are subjects that are pretty much standard fare for practically any engineering major. You'd definatley learn something useful from any of these courses, but it really depends on what you want to do. (For instance, #5 would probably be most useful to industrial, manufacturing, quality, and production engineers) #'s 3,6 would most likely have the greatest application to computer engineers and computer scientests who spend a lot of time trying to develop fast/novel computer algorithms. These math's probably wouldn't get a lot of use in most other engineering disciplines. So, for an EE student such as yourself, you'd probably be best served taking either #1 or #7. Go with #1 if your leaning towards things like signal processing (analog or digital), electronics, etc. Go with seven if you're looking to get into things like logic design, controller design, etc.
5/18/05 4:06 AM
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Slash
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Edited: 18-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3344
i loved complex analysis. amazing shit
5/18/05 1:39 PM
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jgibson
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Edited: 18-May-05
Member Since: 04/30/2001
Posts: 5396
Number 1 it is! Thanks, you guys rock!
5/20/05 3:06 PM
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iceman420
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Edited: 20-May-05
Member Since: 06/30/2003
Posts: 2530
1 is an awesome choice, ESPECIALLY if you're a DSP guy.
5/20/05 5:15 PM
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jgibson
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Edited: 20-May-05
Member Since: 04/30/2001
Posts: 5399
"ESPECIALLY if you're a DSP guy." That's the direction I am thinking of heading in.
5/21/05 7:28 AM
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dracovich
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Edited: 21-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 6065
Thinking about taking complex analysis next year, propably should'v taken it this year insted of this introductionary cosmology, pretty weird class and i'm not going to be taking any more astronomy courses.
5/24/05 3:56 PM
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Edited: 24-May-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3398
cool. jgibson, make sure you become an expert in manipulating sequences and series. they are a basis for a lot of the course material man, this thread brings back memories: cauchy's theorem, laurent theorem, rouche (long ass answers!), louieville, maximum moduli... some very cool stuff i didn't do that well in the course. had something like a 68% going into the exam. i got a 48% on my 2nd of 2 tests (the class average was under 40 though!). however i managed to ace the final and end up with a B+. when i studied for my final i had literally everything concrete in my head and realized what a fucking awesome and powerful course it was. i didn't enjoy the course during the term because my prof had communication problems, although he was a genious. he was extremely theoretical and tended to make things more complicated than it was. i basically learned the course on my own halfway into the course
5/25/05 1:44 AM
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jgibson
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Edited: 25-May-05
Member Since: 04/30/2001
Posts: 5411
"cool. jgibson, make sure you become an expert in manipulating sequences and series. they are a basis for a lot of the course material" Yeah, I'm kind of rusty with that stuff, since I haven't used it much since Calc III.

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