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SoldierGround >> Road Marching tips


7/1/05 11:11 PM
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ChiggidyChops
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Edited: 01-Jul-05
Member Since: 07/06/2002
Posts: 315
 
Ok guys I am not ashamed to admit it, but 12 miles can kick my ass now. My question is how can I train to improve on my time and most importantly saving MY FEET.
7/1/05 11:34 PM
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DrillSergeant"C"
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Edited: 01-Jul-05
Member Since: 07/07/2004
Posts: 152
Are you having standard blister/sore feet problem, or something bigger? Broken in boots are different than worn out boots. Best way to improve time is to ruck. 2 then 4 then 6 then 8 then 12. Start over back at 2 miles with more weight until you get just past the weight you want for your 12 mile time. 10 - 14 days between training RM in the begining. This will let your body get used to it again if it's been sometime. Don't over train by doing too much too soon and don't run with the ruck, it truly will hurt your joints in the long run. Aim for a 15 min mile pace, no slower than that.
7/2/05 7:52 AM
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SFC Matt Larsen
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Edited: 02-Jul-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 429
My advise is, good boots and long miles. You can't expect to be good at something you only do once a weak. Ruck six, three days this week. Next week ad four at the end of the day. Ad miles slowly so you don't max out your feet, meening get stress fractures. I trained my squad up for the British Cambrian patrol several years ago. We had a guy on the team who had hiked the appalachian trail, 2160 miles. He said by rucking in the morning and then latter in the afternoon he got to where he was covering 30+ miles a day easily. We tried it, never being in a hurry or carriing too much weight, and it worked like a charm. We were doing twenty miles a day four or five days a week by the end of the first month. And to top it all off, without running a step for two months, our average 2 mile run time dropped by a 1:30.
7/15/05 3:27 AM
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grambo
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Edited: 15-Jul-05
Member Since: 03/10/2003
Posts: 1064
Once I got up to 12, I did it like this: Jogged a 1/4 mile, then slowed down to a fast to moderate walk for 1/8 mile and got a few sips from my canteen in. Repeated until 12 miles were completed. I paced myself so that I would drink 2 1 quart canteens during the 12 miles. If the course was marked, I would do it to the T, a quarter of a canteen every 3 miles. I used water, but gatoraid would work better if you don't mind cleaning your canteens. A lot of guys love the camelbacks, but I never liked using them for roadmarching. I hated not knowing exactly how much water I had left and not being able to pace myself with it. Once your feet get up to speed, fluids are key. I imagine a powerbar or two during the trip wouldn't hurt either.
8/8/05 6:32 AM
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Eddy Payeur
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Edited: 08-Aug-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1954
ttt
9/6/07 11:49 AM
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lieutenantdan
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Edited: 06-Sep-07
Member Since: 10/26/2002
Posts: 263
ROPER RUCK MARCH TECHNIQUES Body weight must be kept directly over the feet, and sole of shoe must be placed flat on the ground by taking small steps at a steady pace. Knees must be locked on every step in order to rest the leg muscles, especially when going up hill. When walking cross country, step over or around obstacles; never step on them. When traveling up steep slopes, climb in a zig zag pattern rather than straight up. When descending steep slopes, keep the back straight and knees bent to take up the shock of each step. Do not lock your knees. Dig in your heels on each step. Practice walking as fast as you can with a rucksack. Do not run with your rucksack. Even though you may need to trot during the course, try not to, as it may injure you. A good rucksack pace is accomplished by continuous movement for four miles, followed by a 10 minute break, every hour. Faster paces or shorter rests may be used as your conditioning improves. If you cannot rucksack march then do squats with your rucksack (100 repetitions, 5 times or until muscle failure). To avoid knee injury, squat only to the point where then in a 90-degree bend at the knee. Ensure you care for your feet as outlined in this handbook.
9/6/07 11:50 AM
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lieutenantdan
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Edited: 06-Sep-07
Member Since: 10/26/2002
Posts: 264
1. FEET a. Wash and dry the feet daily if possible. b. During the winter, spray the feet daily with an aluminum chlorohydrate antiperspirant. Do this two or three times a day for a week and then once a day for the rest of the winter. If fissures or cracks occur in the feet, discontinue spraying until healed and then use less frequently to control sweating. This process will stop approximately 70 percent of the sweating in your feet. Discontinue spraying during the summer months. c. Massage the feet daily, especially after marching. Use talc or antifungal powder. d. Keep nails trimmed but not too short. Long nails will wear out socks; short nails don't provide support for the ends of the toes. e. Care of blisters. Clean with Betadine and let dry for 5 minutes. Release fluid from the side of a blister with a clean, sterile needle. Gently press the fluid out, leaving the surface intact. Make a doughnut of moleskin to go around the blister and apply it to intact skin. Wrap the entire toe or just over the tope of the moleskin with a loose wrap of adhesive tape. 2. Socks. Good socks provide a variety of protection. a. They insulate the foot from cold, heat, and fire. b. They protect the foot from abrasion by the inside of the boot. c. They provide cushioning from shock to the soles of the feet. d. They aid moisture transfer from the skin to the boot surface. e. They allow for swelling and expansion of the foot during heavy marching. f. A good sock is dense enough to prevent abrasion of the foot at areas of high compression. They should be uniform in thickness over the entire foot. The best issue sock is the tan/ski mountain sock; 75 percent wool, 5 percent nylon or better yet, polypropylene. The nap should face out away from the foot. The best commercial socks are those which are density woven with a noncushioned sole and made of wool.
9/6/07 11:51 AM
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lieutenantdan
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Edited: 06-Sep-07
Member Since: 10/26/2002
Posts: 265
Fitting of Boots. a. There is a boot to fit every size and width foot. Great care must be taken to ensure that boots are fitted properly for the planned use of your feet. The boot you walk around post in is not the best one for road marching. Your foot will lengthen, widen, and generally swell during a march from the load you carry and the pounding that occurs. b. Correct fitting of boots requires a little time, but the benefits are worth the effort. Each foot should be measured. Don't assume they are both the same size and shape. A thin inner sock and a thick outer sock should be worn during the fitting. A pack with the appropriate weight too be carried should be on your back. Stand on the shoe sizing device and lean slightly forward with some weight on the ball of your foot. Measure the length and width of each foot two or three times to ensure that you have the proper size information. Your foot will lengthen and widen under load. This sizing process will allow you a large enough boot to accommodate the proper socks and the change in foot size while you march. You compensate for changes in foot volume (swelling) by having two different thicknesses of insoles for the boots, a sixteenth and an eighth inch. When you start to march, use the thicker insole; midway you will change to dry socks and also switch to a thinner insole if necessary to accommodate your swollen feet. During the beginning of the march you should be thinking about your feet. If you feel any slight compression or abrasion of your foot, stop and apply tape or moleskin to the area as soon as possible. Don't wait until you have a blister to care for your feet.
9/6/07 11:51 AM
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lieutenantdan
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Edited: 06-Sep-07
Member Since: 10/26/2002
Posts: 266
Differential Lacing. The foot must be kept down and back in the boot. It should not slide forward or backward with each stride. To prevent this, especially with speedlace boots, the following procedure is helpful: The boot should be laced very snugly up the boot to the ankle break and tied. The boot is laced looser above the ankle to allow for expansion of the calf and movement of the Achilles tendon. Two sets of laces may be necessary to accomplish this.

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