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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Physiology of Survival Story


8/7/02 11:35 PM
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RicSikora
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Edited: 07-Aug-02 11:40 PM
Member Since: 08-Apr-02
Posts: 7
 
Read Tony's Physiology of Survival post along with all of the fine opinions and answers. I kind of read through it quick, and was wondering if the mood factor was mentioned by anyone as being a part of the equation. Probably was and just worded it a different manner. We all know how a lost job, broken marriage, etc. would affect how we would mentally, emotionally and physically respond if attacked. I know first hand because it played a major part in my response during a private security job I had a few months back. Being basically in a pissed off mood for most of the day, steered me off my usual laid back demeanor and had me emotional and all over the place, instead of strategic and some what in control ( even though I was the ambushee, even after negotiation) Thank God I made a lightning quick switch from surprise mindset to "Nut" (A bit much legally!) To make a long story short, I'm looking at a years probation, for my (by law) excessive aggression (To me aggressive protection) fines, and possible anger management classes. Very unlike me, but I was a loose cannon that day, and couldn't let go of what caused it. Something in my personal life that on most days,wouldn't be that big a deal later on, caused a mood altering chain reaction, that affected how much of the force continuum I decided to follow. Rick
8/8/02 12:12 AM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 08-Aug-02
Member Since: 01-Jan-01
Posts: 158
Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
Rick, Thanks for sharing. Probably the most important thing you can take from this is really about what you can give... You started that process by posting here, so others may learn... IN truth, your emotional and actual probation coudlve been far worse (not knowing the details). Substance training versus subject training can release the beast at the wrong time. Too much emphasis onthe physical can predisipose one to freeze or fight (prematurely)... I just wanted to clarify some things for readers before they fixate on the ambushee's rights etc. A professional must always defuse himself first...its not your fight when you work for someone else...and until youre in psychological control of yourself you cannot efficiently control another. As well, a grumpy mood, while on a security job may not necessarily cause a breech in awareness... but itll likely create a magnet for a confrontation (that 'Just Bring it' element). Im not going to share the obvious as I know you know...just wanted to point stuff out for the corwd that continuously posts that a knife, gun, asswhooping is the best self-defense. Anyhow, Rick and others, live, learn and in the modern world of self-defense, force must parallel danger. Hope this passes fast for you. TOny
8/8/02 12:57 PM
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RicSikora
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Edited: 08-Aug-02
Member Since: 08-Apr-02
Posts: 8
Tony, I hear you, thanks for your feedback. I should have also added to the post that what happened did not make me feel good or give me a dose of self satisfaction. In fact, I felt terrible for what happened because I haven't trained all my life just to prove that I could hurt someone. I should have clarified that the confrontation stemmed from a job, and didn't happen while I was working. I was lucky in a way that someone saw that I wasn't the instigator, and was defending myself, but still, I went over the line. My main point was to share that story, and point out the importance of the 3-D training. Another person might have felt good knowing that what they practice did work, but for me, the first thought that entered my head was that I went against the formula, as well as making a mess of my directive. A learning experience Rick

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