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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Defending against multiple weapons


12/23/05 8:54 AM
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Paul R
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Edited: 23-Dec-05
Member Since: 08/23/2004
Posts: 2
 
There have been a few stories in the news lately (here in New York) about intruders breaking into houses and robbing people at knife/gun point. In most of these cases there have been two (if not three) attackers. My question (which I realize is a very difficult one) is this: What are your options against a multiple weapon threat? The specific situation being two men each armed with a gun, but of course one could have a gun and the other a knife, or both have knives, etc...For the purpose of training let us assume that we are alone and need only worry about defending ourselves (defending your family brings many more variables into the equation). After attending Coach Blauer's combatives camp this past summer (where we spent a lot of time on close quarter weapons defense), and through subsequent training in the SPEAR system, I feel much more confident in using the three C's when dealing with a single attacker armed with a knife/gun, however this particular situation is obviously much more difficult. Any comments/suggestions from Coach Blauer or other PDR coaches would be welcome. Thanks. Paul Rossi
12/28/05 8:05 AM
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Neckcranku
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Edited: 28-Dec-05
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 2561
TTT for a good discussion question!
12/29/05 8:35 AM
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armory
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Edited: 29-Dec-05
Member Since: 08/12/2005
Posts: 65
Potentially endless range of possibilities here...keep in mind a few guidelines when answering OR developing training iterations. - Who else is in the house - Bad guy wants life, body or money...or some combination thereof - Scenario definitely worth the question. Having said that, this is a "what if" that may be alot less likely to happen than others you are to face. So always consider that when developing training sessions. Generally speaking, if you feel "comfortable" with a single attacker with a weapon, you are way ahead of the pack. Introducing weapons in any training scenario is always a challenge. In our training, I found that individuals got a little to over-confident with rubber knives and guns. Typically with those "weapons" there is no price to pay if you screw up. The inclusion of a "price to pay" for a training screw up dynamically changes your potential choices in self protection strategy. I have heard........ummmmmm, that some PDR coach has substituted a stun gun for a rubber knife....and a simunitions gun for a rubber gun. If you have ever been on the receiving end of a contact shot of either of those.....it adds some pucker factor to your training. I am not saying people should run out and do that......just an options facilitator :) Joe M
12/29/05 9:32 AM
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Paul R
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Edited: 29-Dec-05
Member Since: 08/23/2004
Posts: 3
Joe, Thanks for the input. I agree with you about people feeling over-confident when training with "fake" weapons. What I meant about feeling more confident is in comparison to my prior training (which concentrated more on "fancy" techniques) - the three C's leave you with so much less to think about and enable you to act that much sooner. Also, I doubt I would ever feel "comfortable" in a weapon situation (I hope I never have to find out!)...but hey if you have to do something better to have trained for that worst-case scenario that to have ignored it completely. I always recall what Coach Blauer said about knife defense - to always make damn sure you are getting out of the way of the knife (even if it isn't "real")! Paul Rossi
1/4/06 3:29 PM
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Tony Torres
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Edited: 04-Jan-06 03:34 PM
Member Since: 11/21/2005
Posts: 3
Paul, This is a very serious and interesting question. Worst case scenario: this happens to you tonight and you haven't had time to train or prepare. Some of Mr. Blauer's maxims that come to mind: 1. Accept what is happening to you. 2. Get challenged. 3. Never stop thinking. (AKA the three golden rules) 4. "Don't let the math beat you."- T.B. 5. "All defeat is the result of human error." - T.B. Something that is definitely to your advantage: This will more than likely happen in YOUR home. You know every corner, avenue of escape, and available improvised weapons. The fact that you raised the question created awareness of the problem, now it is time to add skill, in order to reduce anxiety. Read my article in our latest SPEAR Tips newsletter; Submission, Subdual, or Survival, for some perspective and inspiration. Start your training in stages: What would you do if you were attacked in your home by a single unarmed opponent in a specific scenario. (ie his goal property, body, life). Create a scenario and practice murphy moment conversions for this. Guess where the best place to practice for this is? Thats right, IN YOUR HOME. Our SPEAR System for Women's Self Defense Video (aka Rape Safe vol 1 & 2) has some great ideas on how to use your home environment for defense. Next stage would be to add multiple UNARMED opponents and apply the scenario and BMF formulas as above. Then go back to a single opponent that is armed. Although the basic principles remain the same, remember that dangerous technology like a knife, gun, or club, does require specialized drills in order for the training to be realistic and effective. Our videos Controlling the Blade, Fundamental Defensive Knife,and Knife and Grappling seminar contain very valuable information on how to deal with the armed assault. Following the progression, the last stage would be to set up scenarios in which there are multiple armed opponents. If you have access to police reports of the incidents, study what the bad guys did so that you can replicate it in your training. (ie "they pushed the victim at knife point down the hallway to the back room") Where would be an opportunity to escape, fight back, etc? If you are familiar with our Range Rover drill, have you tried it with multiple opponents? Have you done the armed and improvized weapon variations? Ultimately if you find yourself in this scenario it will be your assesment of the situation, your will, determination, and ability to improvize that will carry you through. Having some sound skill, strategy, and tactics from intelligent and realistic training will make the job easier. Train hard, be safe. Tony Torres Tactical Training Division Blauer Tactical Systems www.blauertactical.com torres@blauertactical.com
1/13/06 10:49 PM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 13-Jan-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 927
Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
Not much to add to this :-) Tony

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