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Roy Harris >> Quick question for you Roy....


1/13/06 6:37 AM
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Rainman
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Edited: 13-Jan-06
Member Since: 04/28/2005
Posts: 801
 

Roy, I was just going over one of your tapes I hadn't watched in a while - "Intermediate Theory" - and i noticed when you compare basic to intermediate guard passing, you really emphasize for intermediate to ALWAYS go over the legs. Why is this? My underhook pass is tight and works well, certainly against high intermediates (I am close to Purple level now). Is it simply to have me concentrate more specifically on one type of pass? Or do you feel as I go up against much better players i will simply never get the opportunity to use the underhook pass, therefore no point wasting time on it?

Many thanks, Alan.

1/14/06 7:48 AM
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ddk
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Edited: 14-Jan-06
Member Since: 06/26/2000
Posts: 589
wow, i came here to ask the same exact question!
1/14/06 1:18 PM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 14-Jan-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1376
Alan, Thanks for writing! Allow me to share something with you that you may not have heard before. When it comes to teaching to the general public (in group classes, at seminars and on my instructionals), I teach a very "generic" program. In other words, I teach a program that applies to most of the people most of the time. While I certainly could teach my own personal favorite techniques, or the techniques that I feel work best, these would not necessarily work for the majority of people who train BJJ. (When I use the word "majority", I mean 51% to 70% of the people.) So, I teach a program that I have found (through the powers of observation) that work for most of the people I teach. Now, I have been teaching martial arts since 1987 and BJJ since the spring of 1991. I have taught close to 300 seminars in 20 countries around the world. I have literally taught thousands of people, and, have watched how they have responded to the information I have presented. So, when I say that my generic program works for most of the people, most of the time, I know this because I have taught so many people and watched how they have responded to the information that was presented. Even though I have seen how some of the information I have taught did not work for a low percentage of students here and there, MOST of what I taught worked for MOST of the people who attended the seminar, workshop or group class I was teaching. Does that make sense? Now, private lessons are a different animal all together. In private lessons, I can address ONE PERSON's needs and concerns. I will not teach a "generic" program to this one individual because I will only have to concern myself with their unique and individual needs and concerns. Contrast this with group class where I have to consider the lowest denominator - the most uncoordinated and unathletic of students - and try to find a happy medium between these kinds of students and the fast paced, high level visual learners who can see a technique once and perform the technique correctly. (NOTE: While many males are visual learners, it's the high level visual learners that stand out among the rest. The high level visual learners are so good, they can not only see a move once and perform near perfect, but they can see a move once and tell you which muscles they will have to contract in order to make the technique work. They have THAT MUCH awareness over their body! I am a visual learner, but only have a low to lower mid-level of awareness.) ONE MORE COMMENT: All of my instructionals have been generic in nature, except Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Over 40. This one instructional was designed for the practitioner who was getting close to forty years of age and was struggling to balance BJJ training with the other responsibilities in life. While I knew that some would not like this instructional and would make negative comments about it, I also knew that many would like it. How did I know? I have one inbox FULL of questions from 40 to 57 year olds, asking me to put an instructional together to meet their specific needs and concerns. So, I did just that and now many of them are ordering the DVD's like hotcakes and are writing to me to thank me for listening to their concerns. So, even though most of my instructionals are "generic" (designed for most of the people most of the time), this one instructional met a very unique need (and was designed for a specific type of clientele). Now, when I said that passing over the leg was more of an "intermediate" way of passing, what I meant was this: At the high blue to high purple belt level, when students are just starting to feel comfortable and confident with their guard control and guard attacking skills, a student who passes under the leg opens himself for more submissions and sweeps than if they had passed the guard over the leg with their head centered. So, with the use of the simple tactic of passing the guard over the leg, the student can make themselves less vulnerable more often. Now, this doesn't mean that "a student SHOULD NOT pass under the leg." Rather, it means that MOST students should get in the habit of passing over the leg MOST of the time in order to make themselves less vulnerable to attack from the high level belts. And, when they feel frisky or confident, they can use the under the leg guard pass. One last thing: If a student has already become adept at passing the guard under the leg (meaning he or she can pass the guard under the leg with confidence and consistency), he or she should not be so quick to try this new method (because they will have to start the learning process all over again). So my friend, if you have already developed a skill with passing the guard under the leg, and you can do it with confidence on most students at your academy, then my advice to you would be to continue along your path. Keep passing under the leg! Strengthen your strengths! Does that make sense? Good training to you, Roy Harris
1/14/06 2:13 PM
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m.g
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Edited: 14-Jan-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 3726
"Strengthen your strengths" I like that!
1/15/06 7:03 AM
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Rainman
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Edited: 15-Jan-06
Member Since: 04/28/2005
Posts: 802

Roy, fistly thank you for such an indepth and thorough answer. It is very much appreciated. I understand exactly what you are saying. I guess in golf it's called playing the percentage shot, i.e., the one that is most likely to give someone the desired result most of the time.

However, if there are some 'shots' in your bag that you have developed over the years and they work for you personally most the time, then it's possibly worth taking the risk, once you assess the situation, and using them. All makes perfect sense. On your tapes therefore, you are teaching the percentage game, the moves that will work for most of the people most of the time. Why didn't I think of this! doh!

Many thanks again for taking the time to answer this for me.

Regards, Alan

1/19/06 8:08 AM
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Adam LaClair
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Edited: 19-Jan-06
Member Since: 03/23/2002
Posts: 3130
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Thank you for sharing that, Roy.  Of all the times I have trained with you, I don't think I ever heard you explain it in quite that much detail before.  Makes a lot more sense now.

Adam


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