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Roy Harris >> The over 40 gaurd?


3/9/06 5:27 AM
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cdog1955
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Edited: 09-Mar-06 11:20 AM
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 274
 
Roy, The mental approach of the over 40 player that you have given us is really helping me, my question is about taking that approch to the guard. I think everyone would agree the guard has the most technical aspects of BJJ and is the heart and soul of BJJ. It is also the position that gives me (and most all of us) the most trouble. From your experience of watching and teaching older players, do you think its best for us to be a mostly defensive? What aspects should we really concentrate on that most lack?
3/21/06 11:34 AM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 21-Mar-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1420
cdog1955, On my next instructional, I will address this topic in detail. Howeve,r to give you some guidelines until then: 1. You have to FIRST learn how to play a defensive, positional guard. 2. You first have to learn how to educate your legs independent of the arm. Then your arms in dependent of the legs. Then your arms in combination with your legs. 3. You will have to develop this defensive guard to the point of reflex. 4. Next, you will have to train "No Man's Land" and "Side mount escapes" to the point of reflex. 5. Finally, you will have to combine this defensive guard with No Man's Land, Side Mount escapes AND the over 40 offensive guard. In time, I will address all of these areas in detail. However, it will be important at your current skill level to train the material on the instructional DVD and not deviate from it. Why? Because so much of the other instructionals out there are oriented towards the young man's game (and I don't want you mixing the young man's game with the Over 40 material - at least not yet). So, focus on the current material. While you may "know it" and "understand it", I want you to continue training it until you have full confidence with it and can employ it at will !!! With respect to what to focus on in your guard work - Focus on two things: 1. Keeping your elbows and knees together. 2. Focus on control (no sweeps or finishes). Good training to you, Roy Harris
3/23/06 12:26 AM
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BackDrop
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Edited: 23-Mar-06
Member Since: 03/08/2003
Posts: 56
Roy, What is "No Man's Land"?? Thanks.
3/23/06 9:09 AM
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twinkletoesCT
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Edited: 23-Mar-06
Member Since: 12/26/2002
Posts: 4785
Modern Self-Defense Center
Roy's "No Man's Land" training is AWESOME.
3/24/06 8:52 AM
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chickenfeet
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Edited: 25-Mar-06 09:13 AM
Member Since: 10/03/2004
Posts: 262
I have some suggestions that I hope might be relevant. FIRST As an initial matter, I'm going to suggest something that I read on another forum. Stay away from moves like the triangle and the armbar from the guard. Why? Because the possibility of getting stacked by a "twenty year old" and hurting your back is too great. Now, I know that there are effective ways to counter the stack and finish your triangle or armbar. However, all it takes is one mistake. If you triangle your opponent, he stacks you, you attempt to counter his stack, but MESS UP your counter--your back could very quickly get messed up for a long time, or even permanently. When you're twenty, your back can probably take the strain. When you're forty--you don't want to risk it. With your guard attacks, stick with moves that have less of a chance of hurting your back: for example, collar chokes, omoplatas, and sweeps. ROY Roy, I just wanted to say that I have really been enjoying your "BJJ over 40" DVD and am definitely looking forward to the next installment. I am not over 40 by a long shot, but find that the technqiues are definitely applicable for a smaller guy with less attributes. I prefer to flow roll in a relaxed manner, but about 80% of the time, I have to go with guys who are definitely not "relaxed" in their energy :) These techniques have helped me a lot in those situations! In addition, I also wanted to say that I do all no-gi rolling and a lot of the technqiues translate. In particular, your posture/position in the closed guard has itself been worth the price of the DVD. I have had to modify it a bit, of course, since I'm not wearing a gi, but I can honestly say that what was one of my weakest positions (being inside the closed guard of a stronger, technical opponent) has flip-flopped and become one of my stronger positions. I have not been submitted from the closed guard for quite some time now! Good training to you ;) -Matt
4/14/06 9:26 PM
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chickenfeet
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Edited: 14-Apr-06
Member Since: 10/03/2004
Posts: 292
jagg, one hand grabs the opposite wrist like you are describing. however, instead of blocking the side of my face, I grab my opposite trap, turtle my neck, and pinch my head to that side. also, blocking the hips HARD with the elbows.
4/24/06 5:20 AM
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Roy Harris
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Edited: 24-Apr-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1431
When I write "No man's land", I am referring to the position where you opponent is neither in your guard nor across the side on top of you. Rather, he is in limbo in between these two positions. Matt, I am glad to hear the DVD has helped your game! Roy Harris

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