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DantheWolfMan UnderGround >> Thinking about it all the time...


3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Student4Ever
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Hello Mr. Blauer and everyone from the PDR team. I have a question that's been bothering me for some time : I feel like I am always thinking about confrontations... for example : Let's say I am walking down the street and I see a guy walking in front of me coming my way (in broad daylight) I will automatically start imagining a scenario about this guy trying to mug me or attack me for no reason and how I will escape, attack, defuse... etc. This might sound tactical for some, but this is starting to be quite annoying... I always tought that if I train for some time, I would stop thinking about these things (except when I sense real danger) and it would become some sort of second nature... but I've been training for about a year and a half now... and I am still in the same situation... It is starting to make me feel paranoid... and I keep asking myself : Am I lacking something? Am I not training enough? Am I thinking about these things because I am not truly prepared? Wow that's a long question, sorry about that. But any comment would be truly appreciated. Thank you Eric
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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crash
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Perhaps your "paranoia" is justified and may save your life some day...

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Stay safe.
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Yukisan
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Eric, This is something my instructor and I joke about on a regular basis! Actually, we have kinda made a game out of it! When you spend so much time in the dojo training for a confrontation, you can't help but have these thoughts! I believe that this is actually a good thing. I mean, it's not good if your walking around looking over you shoulder all the time, but to be aware of your surroundings and have a plan for a possible attack is a good thing! When we are out in public together, we will sometimes just sit and talk about "what if". I guess in short what I mean to say is don't let this get you paranoid, but use it as a mental training tool. When you start to get these thoughts, go with it! Who knows, you may be preparing yourself for an attack before your attacker has prepared! I hope this helps, but I'm sure that Tony can offer some better advise.
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Horatius
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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You guys just saved me a bunch of $$s in shrink visits. : ) Glad to know I'm not alone. Kevin
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Johnny99
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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The most likely victim is the person whose mind is farthest from a possible confrontation. I noticed that, when I worked in Beverly Hills, there were more purse snatchings than there were in the inner city neighborhoods I'd worked in. I noticed that the average woman on the streets of BH is not paying attention to anything around her. I just hope that some poor innocent schmuck doesn't pass you on the street and reach into his pocket for a stick of gum and get tackled and submitted. :)
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Yanni
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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I suggest you read the book, "The Gift of Fear" by Gavin de Becker. It addresses this matter in great detail and offers helpful suggestions how you can harness your emotions in different situations.
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Tony Blauer
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Blauer Tactical Systems, Inc.
Hi: If you are only questioning if its OK to be game-playing scenarios, my answer is 'of course', if it is creating paranoia or other, then 'no'. What if-ing is part of the blessing/curse of having warrior blood. I odnt know many people who are really into training who do not game play often. Eric, what you do is perfectly normal unless it starts to drive you crazy.... But often, that is simply a matter of perspective. If you reject your mind's processs [in this case] it'll create problems, if you embrace it and play it out or use it to inspire a drill or tactic you are using the energy. "THe true warrior seeks weakness" POnder this and ask yourselves, what does this mean? Tony
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Student4Ever
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Thank you very much Mr. Blauer and everybody else who responded. That's a great quote! It really helps! Thanks again Eric
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Horatius
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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In thinking about this post I've put together these notes that I thought might be of interest. Look forward to Tony's & the PDR teams' feedback! If, as I’ve presumed you are constructively what-ifing then I think a comparison can be made to the actions of a Defensive Driving School graduate – because you understand the dangers and the options/strategies available to you better you are naturally more aware of when those strategies may need to be applied. You would keep track of cars all around you not just those in front. You would check all your mirrors (and you would check their positioning prior to driving) not just your rear view mirror and you would check them regularly. You analyze what may happen and pay particular attention to erratic drivers. This morning the roads were icy here so for my drive in I increased my following distance from 2 secs to 4 sec --- was this paranoia –no - I think prudence is a better descriptive. Based on my assessment of the environmental conditions I determined the appropriate cautionary strategy to insure my safety and implemented it. Another positive aspect of your "what-if-ing" is how it correlates to the concept of “tactical intuition” or coup d’oeil. Clausewitz described this as a commanders “ability to see things simply, to identify the whole business of war with himself”. I suspect most of us are familiar with the beneficial effects of visualization (including the Stanford (?) Basketball control group study). I believe the use of visualization of what may occur and what strategies you can or should employ if it does is essential . We can’t shoot basketballs all day nor can we engage in real street confrontations all day. However, we can visualize these street confrontations and gain valuable data/experience therein. This data that accumulates from these visualizations, from our training, and from study allow us to make those leaps of intuitions that are perhaps the warriors greatest ally. Research indicates that intuition has three common traits: it is a phenomenon of subconscious thought, it relies heavily on experience based knowledge that leads to expertise in a given field, and it is a comprehensive, unrestrained thought process. It is this ability to comprehend the tactical situation at a glance (including the terrain), and then an ability to decide quickly and act, based on that understanding that provides the well trained warrrior the advantage. Napolen said that “ Victory in war does not depend entirely upon numbers or mere courage, only skill and discipline will insure it.” Skill can be gained, as indicated earlier through actual personal experience and training, study of the processes, principles, and factors involved in the subject of ones study, and through realistic and focused visualization. Discipline bears on the consistency and commitment to the skill development, controlling ones emotions and maintaining good habits. Good habits such as assessing the current threat level of your environment , analyzing “how you would attack you”, and wargaiming / what-if-ing possible scenarios throughout the normal course of your day. SHALOM & Hokahey! Kevin
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Student4Ever
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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Horatius : Thank you for taking the time to write your toughts, I am currently re-framing my hole concept of scenario visualisation. Thanks again everyone Eric
3/7/02 8:32 AM
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Horatius
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Edited: 07-Mar-02
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I thought of two things I feel are important and failed to include in my original post: 1) Make sure your visualization includes the whole spectrum of the potential confrontation - including ways to avoid, verbal de-escaltion,...all through the force contimuum. 2) Something I picked up a few years back from a book I read is to use your wargaming skills on news events. For example, if you hear on the news about a carjacking, don't just say Oh no, that's awful,..." instead listen to the report of what happened , what tactics/ploys were used, what did the victim do, what could of been done differently, wargame this for crime reports, natural disasters, whatever and the scope of your what ifs will expand tremendousily and add more data to that subconscious database. (Also, include your loved ones in this wargaming as appropriate.) Kevin
12/11/01 4:37 PM
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Horatius
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Edited: 11-Dec-01
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ttt

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