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7/10/06 7:15 PM
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GonzoPhD
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Edited: 10-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 1573
Rebel Spirit Studios
 
So i got my HVX 200 in january and have been filming bands and events and music videos the stuff looks good, but not great I've been studying lighting and stuff and learning more and more about the camera but what step should I take to add a more professional and awsome look to my work you can got o my myspace sight to see samples and progression through the last few months
7/15/06 11:13 AM
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Demitrius Barbito
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Edited: 15-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 794
The CSPT
The most important thing is getting the best source material you can. Many people think they will fix it in post. It's a shame if everytime you edit you're "fixing" something. The first thing with any new piece of gear is to have an intimate familiarity with it. Most people have a slight understanding of thier cameras and off they go. That's fine but it will not help you when you need to know how to shoot in low light, bright light or with changing focal points. Any camera, no matter how nice, is operator dependant. Are you shooting maunally or on auto f? Are you creating depth of field or using auto focus? Do you have a camera mounted light? Is it adjustable (voltage/barn doors)? The basic point is that you must know how to tell your camera to do what you want it to do. Demi
7/15/06 12:47 PM
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asymmetrik
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Edited: 15-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 785
if you want great lighting. hire professionals ;) so if you're ever shooting in nyc...
7/22/06 10:59 PM
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LEMon
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Edited: 22-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 6014
asym bro, could you give us some lighting tips though, i find this part the hardest by FAR!
7/23/06 12:12 PM
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asymmetrik
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Edited: 23-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 789
easiest thing for me would be to answer specific questions on how to achieve a certain look, so if you've got specific questions, technical or conceptual, post them and we can start a dialog and figure out the best way to get the look you want. however, most of the work is done in planning and off the top of my head, here are a few things to do in the planning stages. for the cinematographer (off the top of my head): - read the script. come up with a look that you think will help to tell the story visually. your tools are light, color, movement, framing, etc. - gather together visual examples that express the style and mood you'd like to create. clip pages from magazines, get samples from movies, music vids, tv shows, photographs, etc. - talk with the director and production designer. have the director talk to you in adjectives. go through the script together scene by scene and develop the look with them. show them your ideas. rework your concepts based on the new information/conversation. - shoot tests! get the production designer and costume designer together with their samples. set up the camera you'll be using (if film have all potential film stocks there). shoot tests under different types and colors of light. if possible, have the lead actors there or someone of a similar skin-color/facial structure. how do the textures and colors of the production designer and costume designers samples react to the different types and color of lighting you're using? does the actor's skin require more of less diffusion? are there any filters on the lens that you want to test? now is the time to try everything. - go over the tests with all involved. rework you ideas if needed. do more tests if necessary. - scout locations with the director, production designer, gaffer (i will talk about this more too if you want) and key grip. how to scout is a lengthy post in itself, but a few things to consider are: power, access, sun position...etc. best thing is to watch films lit by the masters, see how the lighting is helping to tell the story. devise a plan and test, test, test. anyway, hope that's somewhat helpful. i'll be more specific like i said, technically or conceptually, depending on what you'd like to hear.
7/23/06 12:31 PM
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asymmetrik
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Edited: 23-Jul-06
Member Since: 01/01/2001
Posts: 790
oh yea, when shooting tests, having the makeup artist there (with the actors) is also very, very helpful. also if you're shooting film, be sure to do a lattitude test if you're not familiar with the stock. for video, make a note of the lattitude range and try to have the same monitor and scope that you'll be using for the shoot.

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