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PhilosophyGround >> Most Underrated Philosopher


2/16/07 6:31 AM
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Giorgos
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Edited: 16-Feb-07
Member Since: 05/08/2006
Posts: 1440
"Philosophy is dead" rkjmd
2/16/07 1:20 PM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 16-Feb-07 01:33 PM
Member Since: 01/03/2007
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Philosophy used to be the most important of all the academic disciplines. It used to be the heart of the great universities, like the University of Paris at the time of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas. Now, since the modern and post modern philosophers think so little of man's ability to know reality by means of the philosophic method, philosophy has fallen on hard times. Good students now go into the hard sciences, engineering, and medicine. Nietzsche wrote that God is dead because religious devotion no longer played any role in the life of nineteenth century European intellectuals. It wasn't so much a philosophical proposition as it was an observational fact. So, I do not say it with glee, but with profound sadness. Philosophy is dead. Would that it were otherwise. Then I might be practicing philosophy today instead of medicine. But such is life.
2/16/07 4:33 PM
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winnidon
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Edited: 16-Feb-07
Member Since: 11/30/2002
Posts: 215
Philosophy is hardly dead. Though it is also true that it is hardly what it once was. But, that has more to do with what was once explicitly under the domain of philosophy (i.e., natural science, medicince, mathematics, etc)has now come to be its own discipline. Nevertheless, philosophy is alive and well. Though it does fly under the radar. You say you do medicine and what has largely shaped the contemporary goals of medicine (western at least)is philosophy. Though again, like many disciplines, medicine finds its goals being shaped more and more by societal and economic pressures.
2/16/07 4:56 PM
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Subadie
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Edited: 16-Feb-07
Member Since: 10/09/2004
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...and if Duke had not dinged my application for graduate study in philosophy, ohhh.. would be it otherwise, I could have been a pauper, I mean a philosopher
2/16/07 7:16 PM
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Indrek R.
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Edited: 16-Feb-07
Member Since: 07/04/2002
Posts: 1629
Philosophy is more alive than ever...
2/16/07 8:46 PM
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FudoMyoo
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Edited: 16-Feb-07
Member Since: 01/01/2001
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"great universities, like the University of Paris at the time of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas. Now, since the modern and post modern philosophers think so little of man's ability to know reality by means of the philosophic method, philosophy has fallen on hard times"

Maybe philosophy has changed as well.. I don´t many people studying philosophy these days are looking to "know reality" or stuff like that.
2/17/07 4:01 AM
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Indrek R.
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Edited: 17-Feb-07
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Well in a way you are looking to "know reality" just from a different perspective, asking questions that science can´t solve.
2/17/07 4:02 AM
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Indrek R.
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Edited: 19-Feb-07 02:15 AM
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double post
2/17/07 4:02 AM
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Indrek R.
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Edited: 19-Feb-07 02:15 AM
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fcuk triple post
2/18/07 8:08 AM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 18-Feb-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
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ttt
2/19/07 4:08 AM
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FudoMyoo
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Edited: 20-Feb-07 10:43 AM
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" Well in a way you are looking to "know reality" just from a different perspective, asking questions that science can´t solve."

Yes, in a way I agree, but I wold rather say that even though philosophy asks those questions, philosophy really doesn´t solve those questions science can´t solve. But philosophy refines them and makes the questions somewhat clearer.

-edited for clarity, I hope-
2/20/07 2:33 AM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 20-Feb-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
Posts: 1800
good thread
2/21/07 12:58 AM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 21-Feb-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
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ttt
3/6/07 1:57 PM
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vermonter
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Edited: 06-Mar-07
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I'm going to go with Anaximander. He's the "father of cosmology," having come up with the idea that the earth is the center of the universe (better than the competing theory that the earth sat upon a giant turtle's back) and actually coming up with a plausible model of the solar system more than five hundred years BC. He also counted Pythagoras, amongst his students, having a firm grasp on mathematics himself. -doug-
3/6/07 8:13 PM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 06-Mar-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
Posts: 2392
ttt
3/17/07 9:29 AM
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ocianain
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Edited: 17-Mar-07
Member Since: 02/05/2006
Posts: 858
Subadie, What scholastics "debated how many angles could dance on the head of a pin?" I've heard this throw away line used too often to count, yet no one ever cites said scholastics. Could it be because the scholastics never debated any such thing?
3/17/07 8:16 PM
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Subadie
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Edited: 17-Mar-07
Member Since: 10/09/2004
Posts: 733
Perhaps no medieval philosophers specifically said this, but in the 17th century, Isaac D'Israeli (1766-1848), the father of British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli published several books of historical and literary "curiosities," which were quite popular in their day. D'Israeli lampooned the Scholastic philosophers of the late Middle Ages, notably Thomas Aquinas, who were famous for debating metaphysical fine points. These satires appear to be the orgine of the complaints D'Israeli wrote, "Aquinas could gravely debate, Whether Christ was not an hermaphrodite [and] whether there are excrements in Paradise." He might also have mentioned such Thomistic puzzlers as whether the hair and nails will grow following the Resurrection, and whether or not said Resurrection will take place at night. D'Israeli goes on to say, "The reader desirous of being merry with Aquinas's angels may find them in Martinus Scriblerus, in Ch. VII who inquires if angels pass from one extreme to another without going through the middle? And if angels know things more clearly in a morning? How many angels can dance on the point of a very fine needle, without jostling one another?" While this quote appears unfounded, Aquinas did debate whether an angel moving from A to B passes through the points in between, and whether one could distinguish "morning" and "evening" knowledge in angels. (He was referring to an abstruse concept having to do with the dawn and twilight of creation.) Finally, he (Aquinas) inquired whether several angels could be in the same place at once, which of course is the dancing-on-a-pin question less comically stated
3/19/07 11:39 PM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 19-Mar-07
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Posts: 2917
In other words, no, they didn't. Someone later making fun of them said it.
4/25/07 3:49 PM
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bleier
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Edited: 25-Apr-07
Member Since: 05/13/2005
Posts: 210
Schopenhauer Diogenes the dog
4/26/07 7:07 AM
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Subadie
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Edited: 26-Apr-07
Member Since: 10/09/2004
Posts: 777
Plotinus - IMHO, the best call so far. Why would you say so ?
4/29/07 4:59 PM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 29-Apr-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
Posts: 4035
Augustine's essay on time was interesting.
5/18/07 8:51 AM
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CJJScout
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Edited: 18-May-07
Member Since: 04/20/2004
Posts: 380
Francis Schaeffer Alvin Plantinga
5/20/07 3:52 AM
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rkjmd
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Edited: 20-May-07
Member Since: 01/03/2007
Posts: 4400
Josef Seifert
6/8/07 6:41 AM
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Cabal1
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Edited: 08-Jun-07
Member Since: 06/03/2002
Posts: 9911
J L Austin
12/3/07 4:22 PM
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bleier
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Edited: 03-Dec-07
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I used to work the door at a greasy pub, I was reading Spinoza one night and my supervisor told me to stop 'cause I looked like a pussy, so I threw him into a bicycle rack.  Spinoza is awesome.  There is a great photo somewhere of Arne Naess reading Spinoza by candle-light on top of a glacier.

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