Bruce Lee demonstrates his skills on Hong Kong TV in 1969

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Bruce Lee was a martial artist, actor, and philosopher as well as a true pioneer who really started the martial arts craze in the west. There is an argument to be made that without Bruce Lee generating interest in the martial arts there would be no UFC around today.

In this clip from Hong Kong TV from 1969, we see the master, Bruce Lee himself demonstrating some of his favorites techniques.

Bruce goes over several of his tricks and techniques in this clip and also goes over some of his philosophy on fighting and the martial arts which was pretty much unequaled at the time. He even shows his one finger push ups which would take an unbelievable amount of coordination and finger/hand strength to perform.

Bruce also shows his one inch punch technique to break a board and the amount of power he is able to generate in such a small amount of distance is pretty amazing.

When he demonstrates a leaping a side kick he literally sends the poor guy holding the pad flying back. According to Bruce Lee “kicking properly is the most powerful and damaging blow you can administer.”

Bruce Lee first got his start in martial arts by training in various Chinese martial arts which included wing chun as his main focus before creating his own style of jeet kune do which is more of a philosophical, concept-based martial art when compared to traditional styles.

ABOUT BRUCE LEE:
Lee Jun-fan, known professionally as Bruce Lee, was a Hong Kong and American actor, martial artist, philosopher, filmmaker, and founder of the martial art Jeet Kune Do. Lee was the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media, and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time, and a pop culture icon of the 20th century. He is often credited with helping to change the way Asians were presented in American films. [Source: Wiki]

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