Old man goes TKD-beastmode against much younger opponent

Friday, December 30, 2016

Taekwondo is a Korean traditional martial art specializing in powerful, often extravagant kicking techniques. For a traditional martial art it is actually relatively new, as it wasn’t developed until the 1940’s.

In this YouTube video we get to see an aging taekwondo practitioner overwhelm his much younger opponent quite dominantly. Though the video title hints at his young opponent being a boxer, that’s a bit of a stretch as it looks like he has zero idea how to fight.

Still though, even against an unskilled opponent, age is an important factor when it comes to fighting. A younger fighter will usually possess a notable physical advantage just in terms of what he is physically capable of in there as well as recovery.

We see a variety of impressive kicking techniques from the older fighter in this one, including a hook/crescent kick to start out and a sweet axe kick which slips right through his opponents guard. We also see a nice spinning back kick which is a very powerful technique and can be seen utilized by many MMA fighters including Georges St. Pierre.

Surprisingly enough too, the old man finishes him off with a punching combination which is not a specialty of taekwondo. The younger fighter just seems to wilt under the pressure and the referee is forced to end this one-sided contest.

ABOUT TAEKWONDO:

Taekwondo is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.

Taekwondo was developed during the 1940s and 1950s by various martial artists by incorporating elements of Karate and Chinese Martial Arts with indigenous Korean martial arts traditions such as Taekkyeon, Subak, and Gwonbeop. The oldest governing body for taekwondo is the Korea Taekwondo Association (KTA), formed in 1959 through a collaborative effort by representatives from the nine original kwans, or martial arts schools, in Korea. [Source: Wiki]

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