David Jacobs' BJJGround Analysis of guard retention in competition (Giles)

19 days ago
10/19/02
Posts: 358

13 days ago
3/17/08
Posts: 4453
Good stuff. Thanks for sharing it. Any thoughts on stripping grips and hand fighting (when do you find it more or less successful/not worth the effort)? Looking forward to checking out the new guard retention video.
13 days ago
11/10/05
Posts: 7496
good stuff.

I also do that 1 foot away type thing mostly from collar sleeve. The collar & sleeve control distance in one direction. Foot on hip controls the other direction. So that's total distance control. Using the other foot on the bicep is for either defending his attempts to overcome that distance control or for my own attacks. Foot on the bicep is a very powerful way of turning your opponent's shoulders which is a basis of so many attacks and sweeps (arm bar, triangle, flower sweep, arm drag, etc) However I don't need to commit the foot on the bicep until I need it. Otherwise I risk having losing that battle.


I still disagree with your overall principle of hip escape, but in the circumstances that you have shown, I would not disagree. But also:
- helping to pull out your 1/2 guard knee for connecting to your elbow. Also to move your head down in the direction of your tail bone

- escaping scarf hold by bring your knee inside his hip.

- moving towards turtle.. Why push into your opponent. Sometimes it's better to transition to turtle by moving away from your opponent

- backwards shoulder roll recovery from side control... I like having the top person at 10:00-11:00 rather than 9:00 or 12:00


- when playing sitting dlr guard and top person is driving his knee over your leg or onto your torso. Shrimp/scoot directly backwards and drag your opponent into the hole.

I guess most of the cases I'm discussing are escapes rather than retention.
What's your thoughts on these?

12 days ago
10/19/02
Posts: 359
Meatgrinder - good stuff.

I also do that 1 foot away type thing mostly from collar sleeve. The collar & sleeve control distance in one direction. Foot on hip controls the other direction. So that's total distance control. Using the other foot on the bicep is for either defending his attempts to overcome that distance control or for my own attacks. Foot on the bicep is a very powerful way of turning your opponent's shoulders which is a basis of so many attacks and sweeps (arm bar, triangle, flower sweep, arm drag, etc) However I don't need to commit the foot on the bicep until I need it. Otherwise I risk having losing that battle.


I still disagree with your overall principle of hip escape, but in the circumstances that you have shown, I would not disagree. But also:
- helping to pull out your 1/2 guard knee for connecting to your elbow. Also to move your head down in the direction of your tail bone

- escaping scarf hold by bring your knee inside his hip.

- moving towards turtle.. Why push into your opponent. Sometimes it's better to transition to turtle by moving away from your opponent

- backwards shoulder roll recovery from side control... I like having the top person at 10:00-11:00 rather than 9:00 or 12:00


- when playing sitting dlr guard and top person is driving his knee over your leg or onto your torso. Shrimp/scoot directly backwards and drag your opponent into the hole.

I guess most of the cases I'm discussing are escapes rather than retention.
What's your thoughts on these?

I agree with that, but I think you took my don't hip escape to mean at any point. I was specifically referring to open guard retention, it is a very useful movement for escapes from side control, mount, and half guard retention.

10 days ago
11/10/05
Posts: 7499
lach - 
Meatgrinder - good stuff.

I also do that 1 foot away type thing mostly from collar sleeve. The collar & sleeve control distance in one direction. Foot on hip controls the other direction. So that's total distance control. Using the other foot on the bicep is for either defending his attempts to overcome that distance control or for my own attacks. Foot on the bicep is a very powerful way of turning your opponent's shoulders which is a basis of so many attacks and sweeps (arm bar, triangle, flower sweep, arm drag, etc) However I don't need to commit the foot on the bicep until I need it. Otherwise I risk having losing that battle.


I still disagree with your overall principle of hip escape, but in the circumstances that you have shown, I would not disagree. But also:
- helping to pull out your 1/2 guard knee for connecting to your elbow. Also to move your head down in the direction of your tail bone

- escaping scarf hold by bring your knee inside his hip.

- moving towards turtle.. Why push into your opponent. Sometimes it's better to transition to turtle by moving away from your opponent

- backwards shoulder roll recovery from side control... I like having the top person at 10:00-11:00 rather than 9:00 or 12:00


- when playing sitting dlr guard and top person is driving his knee over your leg or onto your torso. Shrimp/scoot directly backwards and drag your opponent into the hole.

I guess most of the cases I'm discussing are escapes rather than retention.
What's your thoughts on these?

I agree with that, but I think you took my don't hip escape to mean at any point. I was specifically referring to open guard retention, it is a very useful movement for escapes from side control, mount, and half guard retention.


ah thanks for the reply.
I'm not sure I disagree with you then. I could prob think of a few instances but then we'd be talking more about the exception than the rule such as in some spider guard or double sleeve type situations but then I'm not talking no-gi either.

And with any sort of hip movement, I would say that you'd prefer to do it with your foot on your opponent for better attachment rather than posting it on the mat and losing that connectivity.