David Jacobs' BJJGround Any old time catch guys still alive?

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14403
I know Billy Robinson died a few years back. Too bad never had a chance to train with him. Any other guys like him still around?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11107

lots

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14404
de braco - 

lots


There's lots of old time catch guys still around?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11108

new times ones also

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14405
de braco - 

new times ones also


Awesome, what old time ones are you familiar with?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11109

this is the wigan hold on first tuesday from 1988. uploaded by psxgunman. Roy Wood stills runs the gym

 

 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11110

Tommy Heyes

 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11111

Dick Cardinal

 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11112

wade schalles

 

 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11113

one of our resident bjj experts incredibly found a way to turn cardinals simpleton move into a "submission" hold, we're surrounded by a tribe of fucking geniuses on multi colored home depot toddler mats

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14406
Awesome thanks! Are any one of the ones listed more renowned than the others in your opinion?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11114

Schalles is probably the most responsible, albeit indirectly, for the renewal of interest

5 days ago
9/26/07
Posts: 713

I know several people in the uk who have been working to bring back catch wrestling. They told me that the original old style catch wrestling gyms all pretty much switched to teaching international freestyle rules probably around the 70s or 80s. This is because there was really no interest in Catch. I imagine it’s similar to the way many traditional martial arts schools are switching to mma, bjj and kickboxing these days. 

Edited: 5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11115

and fujiwara of course, his instructional tape set from 93', along with schalles set from the 80's set some wheels in motion. wheels within wheels.

One of the newer guys, billy scott, has a gym somewhere in that vast terra incognita known as greater kain-tuck-eeee

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14407
de braco - 

and fujiwara of course, his instructional tape set from 93', along with schalles set from the 80's set some wheels in motion. wheels within wheels.

One of the newer guys, billy scott, has a gym somewhere in that vast terra incognito known as greater kain-tuck-eeee


Awesome, thanks. I know about Schalles college wrestling credentials but as far as his catch, was he a student of Billy Robinson? If not where did he learn the catch side of things from?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11116

it's called folk

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11117

in my day it was still called cacc

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11118

Here it's depicted in a boys life magazine from 1947

5 days ago
7/30/03
Posts: 7387
Denis Kelly -

I know several people in the uk who have been working to bring back catch wrestling. They told me that the original old style catch wrestling gyms all pretty much switched to teaching international freestyle rules probably around the 70s or 80s. This is because there was really no interest in Catch. I imagine it’s similar to the way many traditional martial arts schools are switching to mma, bjj and kickboxing these days. 

Catch seems like a very niche market. I think the problem with running a catch school is you miss out on the bulk of paying customers because of the neck cranks, rips when transitioning (rubbing induced pain), etc. It’s like an old school boxing gym where it hurts to train everyday only boxing gyms have guys who are looking to go pro in them and there is no money in going pro at catch wrestling so they miss out on that part of the market also. 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11119

it began it's large scale resurgence when tiger mask opened the super tiger gym in 84 as a commercial enterprise training shooters

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14408
Anyone alive who learned extensively from Billy Robinson's teacher (Billy Riley I believe) or from Robinson and can teach as close to how he did?
5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14409
Calhoon - 
Denis Kelly -

I know several people in the uk who have been working to bring back catch wrestling. They told me that the original old style catch wrestling gyms all pretty much switched to teaching international freestyle rules probably around the 70s or 80s. This is because there was really no interest in Catch. I imagine it’s similar to the way many traditional martial arts schools are switching to mma, bjj and kickboxing these days. 

Catch seems like a very niche market. I think the problem with running a catch school is you miss out on the bulk of paying customers because of the neck cranks, rips when transitioning (rubbing induced pain), etc. It’s like an old school boxing gym where it hurts to train everyday only boxing gyms have guys who are looking to go pro in them and there is no money in going pro at catch wrestling so they miss out on that part of the market also. 


Good point. All the judo schools I've been to have had far less students that the BJJ schools probably due to most people not wanting to get thrown and beat up.
5 days ago
9/26/07
Posts: 715
Calhoon -
Denis Kelly -

I know several people in the uk who have been working to bring back catch wrestling. They told me that the original old style catch wrestling gyms all pretty much switched to teaching international freestyle rules probably around the 70s or 80s. This is because there was really no interest in Catch. I imagine it’s similar to the way many traditional martial arts schools are switching to mma, bjj and kickboxing these days. 

Catch seems like a very niche market. I think the problem with running a catch school is you miss out on the bulk of paying customers because of the neck cranks, rips when transitioning (rubbing induced pain), etc. It’s like an old school boxing gym where it hurts to train everyday only boxing gyms have guys who are looking to go pro in them and there is no money in going pro at catch wrestling so they miss out on that part of the market also. 

Well I actually think it’s probably more popular now than it ever has been due to the popularity of mma, Nogi Grappling etc. But just there was a point in history where the people with the most expertise in catch ( at least in England anyway) must have decided that it was dying out and there would never be any interest in it and instead just focus on teaching freestyle wrestling to the next generation because that’s a hugely popular international sport whereas catch was seen as an antiquated relic from a bygone era. 

I imagine the same would’ve have happened in Japan with older styles of Jiujitsu once judo started becoming a huge international sport. 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11120
FatBuddha - Anyone alive who learned extensively from Billy Robinson's teacher (Billy Riley I believe) or from Robinson and can teach as close to how he did?

Billy Scott, Miyato, Sakuraba, josh barnett from Robinson, Tommy Heyes from Riley and the robbie brothers who were the big dogs at rileys gym

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 11121
Denis Kelly -
Calhoon -
Denis Kelly -

I know several people in the uk who have been working to bring back catch wrestling. They told me that the original old style catch wrestling gyms all pretty much switched to teaching international freestyle rules probably around the 70s or 80s. This is because there was really no interest in Catch. I imagine it’s similar to the way many traditional martial arts schools are switching to mma, bjj and kickboxing these days. 

Catch seems like a very niche market. I think the problem with running a catch school is you miss out on the bulk of paying customers because of the neck cranks, rips when transitioning (rubbing induced pain), etc. It’s like an old school boxing gym where it hurts to train everyday only boxing gyms have guys who are looking to go pro in them and there is no money in going pro at catch wrestling so they miss out on that part of the market also. 

Well I actually think it’s probably more popular now than it ever has been due to the popularity of mma, Nogi Grappling etc. But just there was a point in history where the people with the most expertise in catch ( at least in England anyway) must have decided that it was dying out and there would never be any interest in it and instead just focus on teaching freestyle wrestling to the next generation because that’s a hugely popular international sport whereas catch was seen as an antiquated relic from a bygone era. 

I imagine the same would’ve have happened in Japan with older styles of Jiujitsu once judo started becoming a huge international sport. 

Cecchine set it off with his set from WMA,