David Jacobs' BJJGround Eddie Bravo "The Twister" can no longer twist!

9 days ago
8/20/19
Posts: 189

On the fight companion, 

Eddie said after his surgery his doctor said - no twisting of your spine any more. So he's essentially not supposed to roll.

No timestamp because it's still a live video at the time I am posting this.

8 days ago
10/27/03
Posts: 24355

As a fan of his bjj, doesn’t this put a sever dent in his teachings?

He is extremely flexible in the hips but has had to have back surgery?

Edited: 7 days ago
8/8/09
Posts: 3779
I hope this isn't the case. Big loss for BJJ if so.
7 days ago
2/25/06
Posts: 5767

Wow, that sucks. 

7 days ago
7/31/09
Posts: 5403
FingerorMoon -

As a fan of his bjj, doesn’t this put a sever dent in his teachings?

He is extremely flexible in the hips but has had to have back surgery?

Lots of guys who train hard have fucked up backs

Edited: 7 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 35073
He's gonna have to do a Prince:

Eddie "the artist formerly known as 'The Twister'" Bravo
7 days ago
10/27/03
Posts: 24356
robbie380 -
FingerorMoon -

As a fan of his bjj, doesn’t this put a sever dent in his teachings?

He is extremely flexible in the hips but has had to have back surgery?

Lots of guys who train hard have fucked up backs

Lol well yes it’s true as well that Rorian sold us all a big lie. Throughout the 90s and into the 2000s we were all like, “fuck I’ve got so many injuries right now but I’m gonna be so much healthier in old age because of BJJ just like Helio, not like all the other broken down old guys!”

But major back surgery before 50 is not standard.

7 days ago
8/28/10
Posts: 12497
shen - He's gonna have to do a Prince:

Eddie "the artist formerly known as 'The Twister'" Bravo

He'll be known as the blunt or pot leaf symbol or an alien head

7 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 13678
FingerorMoon -
robbie380 -
FingerorMoon -

As a fan of his bjj, doesn’t this put a sever dent in his teachings?

He is extremely flexible in the hips but has had to have back surgery?

Lots of guys who train hard have fucked up backs

Lol well yes it’s true as well that Rorian sold us all a big lie. Throughout the 90s and into the 2000s we were all like, “fuck I’ve got so many injuries right now but I’m gonna be so much healthier in old age because of BJJ just like Helio, not like all the other broken down old guys!”

But major back surgery before 50 is not standard.

I didnt want to watch that whole thing, somebody got a timestamp?

 

but do you think it is a question of style and emphasis in training? Even rickson is fubar in his back, but he has more miles and years on him. So does some of thses crazy styles of guard take more toll on a body? I known a few peolle that did so much guard and screwed their backs.....Id guess it is a big factor

 

7 days ago
1/25/06
Posts: 4997

Prioritizing competition over longevity is the problem imho

7 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 3479
I think Rubber Guard uses constant flexion of the spine sometimes to an extreme. If you work all the time from these flexed positions there could be a lot of stress on the spine....

Anyway Eddie says he is actually rolling even his doctor says no twisting.
6 days ago
5/11/08
Posts: 2086

I think a big issue is this need hobbyists seem to have to train like a professional athlete. Training 5+ times a week, lifting, CrossFit, etc. Plus they basically give themselves no off season. Doing any sport with that type of intensity is going to lead to problems. Guys need to accept much earlier into their training that it's ok to train twice a week or even once a week for stretches at a time and their progression will be fine.

The idea that you can't get better if you train less than three times a week is also silly. Would we say that about any other sport or hobby someone took up? That training or learning with a good teacher and other students twice a week wouldn't allow them to get better?

 

6 days ago
4/5/07
Posts: 10416
pbody -

I think a big issue is this need hobbyists seem to have to train like a professional athlete. Training 5+ times a week, lifting, CrossFit, etc. Plus they basically give themselves no off season. Doing any sport with that type of intensity is going to lead to problems. Guys need to accept much earlier into their training that it's ok to train twice a week or even once a week for stretches at a time and their progression will be fine.

The idea that you can't get better if you train less than three times a week is also silly. Would we say that about any other sport or hobby someone took up? That training or learning with a good teacher and other students twice a week wouldn't allow them to get better?

 

I don't know about that.  When I was training once a week, I felt like it was just often enough to realize I was getting worse.  Two times a week felt like it was enough to maintain or make very slow progress.  3+ times a week is ideal, but that doesn't mean you have to roll hard every class.  Of course, it can take some self control to not roll hard.  

But, if your style involves contorting yourself, maybe even drilling is rough on the body.  Over the last 2 years I've had to switch to a more aggressive top game, as working from the bottom was getting my neck wrenched too often.  

5 days ago
4/27/18
Posts: 1643

There’s a young guy at our gym who is so flexible it’s like he has 4 arms.

but the toll on the back and joints has got to be horrific for longevity 

 

5 days ago
3/20/14
Posts: 903
pbody -

I think a big issue is this need hobbyists seem to have to train like a professional athlete. Training 5+ times a week, lifting, CrossFit, etc. Plus they basically give themselves no off season. Doing any sport with that type of intensity is going to lead to problems. Guys need to accept much earlier into their training that it's ok to train twice a week or even once a week for stretches at a time and their progression will be fine.

The idea that you can't get better if you train less than three times a week is also silly. Would we say that about any other sport or hobby someone took up? That training or learning with a good teacher and other students twice a week wouldn't allow them to get better?

 

So a hobbyist is anyone who’s not competing at the top of the food chain, regardless of goals? I’m confused. How do these overtrained practicioners ever get to a pro level?

5 days ago
5/8/11
Posts: 5234

cbd oil and stem cells can't fix this???

Edited: 4 days ago
10/30/09
Posts: 144

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.

Edited: 4 days ago
10/30/09
Posts: 145

 

4 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14429
Michael Piekarski - 

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.


Thanks! As far as #3 goes is passive movement like that bad for your lumbar spine?
1 day ago
6/22/19
Posts: 50
Michael Piekarski -

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.

Michael-

As a physical therapist what do you think of this exercise at 5:25? And 7:50 essentially single legged angled bridge and raised single legged angled bridge

https://youtu.be/1mru33xLcDE

1 day ago
6/22/19
Posts: 51
Michael Piekarski -

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.

Is #3 doing the opposite of the exercise dead bug?

1 day ago
10/30/09
Posts: 146
FatBuddha -
Michael Piekarski - 

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.


Thanks! As far as #3 goes is passive movement like that bad for your lumbar spine?

General guide is having as much active control of each articulation (joint) in your body. Having a large disperity of active to passive means there is a range of motion that you cannot control. 

For the spine you want to have equal segmental movement. You have 5 lumbar vertebrae and if you have one segment that moves too much and several segments that move too little one segment is bound to get over stressed. Either the one that moves too much has to absorb more load then it can handle or the segments that move too little get forced to move in a range of motion they do not have.

1 day ago
10/30/09
Posts: 147
Kahunadog -
Michael Piekarski -

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.

Michael-

As a physical therapist what do you think of this exercise at 5:25? And 7:50 essentially single legged angled bridge and raised single legged angled bridge

https://youtu.be/1mru33xLcDE

Often when someone has lumbar pain they utilize a poor movement strategy of using their lumbar spine for extension instead of their glutes for extension. Less common in athletes. A proper bridge is teaching hip extension not lumbar extension. You may get low loads to the lumbar spine to gradually load injured tissue.

In rehab you have 3 goals:

1. Low levels of load to injured tissue to "heal" it.

2. Address areas near the injured area that may predispose someone to overload that area. Ie improving hip and upper back function to minimize irritation of the lumbar spine.

3. Address any movement faults that may have developed that can lead someone to repetitive irritate their "damaged' tissue.

Rener's reasoning for the exercise is faulty.

1 day ago
10/30/09
Posts: 148
Kahunadog -
Michael Piekarski -

My opinion as a physical therapist and black belt in jiu jitsu:

 

1. Eddie started training too early. After lumbar surgeries you are allowed to return to twisting however he probably went back to training way too soon. Lumbar surgery rehab can be 6 months to allow your tissue to adapt to the new disc (I will need to look into the exact rehab protocol and tissue healing time frame for that specific surgery).

2. I don't think Eddie took either his rehab seriously, both prior to the surgery and after. Rehabilitation for low back pain is very complex (#1 cause for disability in either the US or the world) as it is usually a blend of pathoanatomical dysfunction and biopsychosocial factors. I remember looking at Eddie trying to rehab his back a few years ago and was working with a generic personal trainer not a sports physical therapist who understood the demands of the sport. 

3. The rubber guard uses a lot of PASSIVE movement of the hips (you are grabbing your feet and pulling them into the correct positions) as opposed to using ACTIVE movement. Often you may be bending your back in positions to angle your pelvis correctly for your hips.

Is #3 doing the opposite of the exercise dead bug?

The deadbug is an exercise that is often done incorrectly. I tend to use it to develop eccentric control of the diaphragm which may assist with stability of the spine.