Train Judo Ground Learned Quickness by Fabio Basile

27 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2128

 

This past week I bought Learned Quickness by Olympic Champion Fabio Basile. It is fantastic. Here is my review and the above clip is one of the throws he shows. 

"Learned Quickness by Fabio Basile is an incredible instructional. Watching an Olympic gold medalist in his prime demonstrate his favorite techniques is truly amazing. Not only is Fabio's technique precise and powerful, but his rationale for doing some things different than most people makes so much sense. He clearly has a very high judo IQ, and I guarantee you will learn details and variations that you have never seen before. Just hearing his introduction at the beginning of the instructional gives you insight into the mind of an Olympic champion."

  

 

  

25 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4206

I  am vrey impressed.  Please show us more of his techniques.  Excellent breakdown and demonstration.

24 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2129

Here is another one of the techniques on the instructional.  

24 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4207

WOW, I am so impressed with his instruction explanation.   Many videos I have  show the technique but not the detail why it works. Most instrutionals showcase the favorite techniques of the judoka without all the explanation. They focus on the body movements and how they make it work which is good, don't get me wrong.  Keep it coming, thanks.

23 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 7861

That guy is incredible.  The Uchi-Komi point he made was interesting. I could see instructors disagreeing with him but it's really cool. I wasn't sure they were speaking Italian at first till I saw his name. LOL.

23 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2130
Outkaster - 

That guy is incredible.  The Uchi-Komi point he made was interesting. I could see instructors disagreeing with him but it's really cool. I wasn't sure they were speaking Italian at first till I saw his name. LOL.


He spends more time talking about his uchi-komi in some of the other videos. Very interesting to hear his take on why he does it different than the traditional manner. His details on deashi-barai are the best. Details I have never seen anyone else bring up before. Fabio is trying to make history by winning Olympic gold in two different weight categories (66 and 73kg). In another interview he talks about his dream of catching Ono with his deashi in the 2021 Olympics.

23 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2131
judoblackbelt - 

WOW, I am so impressed with his instruction explanation.   Many videos I have  show the technique but not the detail why it works. Most instrutionals showcase the favorite techniques of the judoka without all the explanation. They focus on the body movements and how they make it work which is good, don't get me wrong.  Keep it coming, thanks.


Really awesome stuff. As I state in my previous post his deashi-barai details are the best. He even demonstrates deashi several time with his eyes closed and his execution is flawless. Unfortunately, the above two videos are the only ones from his instructional on YouTube.

23 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4208

If you can't show us please tell us his deashi secrets. Thanks.

22 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2132
judoblackbelt - 

If you can't show us please tell us his deashi secrets. Thanks.


When you are moving sidways with the uke and ready to attack with deashi you take two short fast stutter steps to their one before sweeping the foot. So when the uke takes one step you take two instead of only taking one step as many people show. Because you take two short fast steps you have a lot of power and speed when you sweep.

22 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4209

When we practiced deashi it was with the opponents foot moving forward.  But I remember when we practiced Okuri ashi barai.  We would take 2 small steps to get the opponent moving in front of us and then a bigger step folllowed by the sweep to the side.

22 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2134
judoblackbelt -

When we practiced deashi it was with the opponents foot moving forward.  But I remember when we practiced Okuri ashi barai.  We would take 2 small steps to get the opponent moving in front of us and then a bigger step folllowed by the sweep to the side.

Yes, deashi is often practiced with the person stepping forward, but my understanding is that anytime you sweep the foot that is in front of the body it is considered deashi, regardless if the person is moving forward, backward, or to the side. If one foot is swept into the other then it becomes okuri. 

20 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4210

Aaron, you are a better student of judo than I am.   I had a difference of opinion with a FB judoka on a technique he called deashi and I called kosoto gari.  The front foot was swept to the side/front but the opponent was moving backwards. I called it kosoto gari and he objected vigorusly that it was deashi. Just how I was taught. Most important is to be able to execute the throw with a resisting partner.  

20 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2135
judoblackbelt - 

Aaron, you are a better student of judo than I am.   I had a difference of opinion with a FB judoka on a technique he called deashi and I called kosoto gari.  The front foot was swept to the side/front but the opponent was moving backwards. I called it kosoto gari and he objected vigorusly that it was deashi. Just how I was taught. Most important is to be able to execute the throw with a resisting partner.  


At times it can be very hard to distinguish between kosoto gari and deashi. Keiji Suzuki shows variations of both on Superstar Judo and sometimes they look identical to me. The only conclusion I've come to is that a kosoto gari relies more on using your hands to off balance your opponent while a deashi barai is more about catching the foot at the right moment so your opponent falls like a sack of potatoes. I could be wrong though.

Edited: 20 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2136

 

 

Here is Suzuki's deashi and kosoto gari. You can see his deashi in the first video looks very similar to his kosoto that he demonstrates at the 5 second mark of the second video. Only difference I can tell is in the direction of the kuzushi.  

18 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4211

Keiji Suzuki is my favorite HW of all time.  He beat much bigger guys all the time. The way I was taught is demostrated in the 2 videos. Deashi the foot is moving forward and uke is not moving backwards.  In Kosoto Gari the opponent is moving backwards and foot is swept to the side/forward.  The key is the direction uke is moving somewhat. 

Edited: 18 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2137
judoblackbelt -

Keiji Suzuki is my favorite HW of all time.  He beat much bigger guys all the time. The way I was taught is demostrated in the 2 videos. Deashi the foot is moving forward and uke is not moving backwards.  In Kosoto Gari the opponent is moving backwards and foot is swept to the side/forward.  The key is the direction uke is moving somewhat. 

I think the key is knowing what the word "deashi" really means in Japanese. If it means "advancing or moving forward" then I concur that the uke stepping forward defines a deashi barai. If it means "forward or in front", however, then I will continue to argue that the sweeping of the front foot is what defines a deashi regardless of the direction the uke is moving. The true meaning of deashi, however, is important, and we shouldn't rely on some English translation that's been accepted over time. Seoi nage is a good example of what I'm talking about. A lot of people call seoi nage "shoulder throw" but "seoi" does not actualy mean shoulder in Japanese. It means "putting on one's back." Therefore the actually meaning of seoi nage is "putting on one's back to throw." This makes a lot of sense when you think about it. That's why I'm curious to know what deashi really means. 

15 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 7883

All the ashi techniques are sometimes overlooked as people want the high scoring throws. I have met guys that were good and said they got beat by ashi techniques and it was devastating.

10 days ago
3/28/07
Posts: 4216

Wow Aaron, I have to keep it simple for me and go by how I was taught.  And there are difference of opinions on this.

4 days ago
12/21/04
Posts: 2147

Highlight of Fabio competing in the 73kg division (2018-2020) after winning Olympic gold in the 66kg division in 2016.