OtherGround Forums Does HIIT build muscle?

6 days ago
2/9/09
Posts: 9364

Im a big Tim Kennedy fan, and notice all his workouts are circuit training...yet Tim is a pretty jacked dude. Can you get that big with HIIT?  

6 days ago
7/6/14
Posts: 3757

Im pretty sure hiit preserves muscle so yes.... You really want to do liss or hiit and stay away from the middle like jogging or something that is too much for light cardio but not enough to get a epoc stimulas. They say hiit is good but the recovery takes longer...liss takes longer but recovery is shorter so whatever works best for u...

6 days ago
3/17/03
Posts: 16564

Definitely. At this point I only build muscle when doing HIT routines. The trick is the intensity though.

 

If you aren't working out angry and really trying to throw weight up on that last set, you aren't doing much.

6 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 21260
HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.
6 days ago
6/26/06
Posts: 123840
Wiggy - HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.

As a bootcamper still (not as often) and glformer Orangetheory and crossfitter, I can tell you wiggy knows his shit on all this from my other thread.    The lack of periodzation and randomness and yes either overtraining or overkill makes HIIT not as great as once thought.  At least not in manner it's being done and by who .   Longer rests and shorter bursts would be better 

6 days ago
3/17/03
Posts: 16566
"HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing."

My brain misfired on that one.
6 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 21261
Girly - 
Wiggy - HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.

As a bootcamper still (not as often) and glformer Orangetheory and crossfitter, I can tell you wiggy knows his shit on all this from my other thread.    The lack of periodzation and randomness and yes either overtraining or overkill makes HIIT not as great as once thought.  At least not in manner it's being done and by who .   Longer rests and shorter bursts would be better 


Thanks for the props man, but it's really a different set of issues.

This is gonna sound like I'm being a semantics asshole, but the problem is that you've had people mis-using terms for so long that now when discussions are had with people that actually know what they mean (and speak of them appropriately), you end up having two people in the same conversation talking about two different things and they don't even realize it.

HIIT = High Intensity Interval Training

Long story short, it's a form of training where you're working at as high of an intensity as possible.

When people think "intensity" they think how hard you're working or how mean you are or whatever bro-tastic definition. The *actual* definition of "intensity" from an exercise science perspective is that one of capability.

Meaning the higher the "intensity", the nearer you're working toward your maximum capability - no matter what the of exercise.

Arthur Jones' HIT / High Intensity Training (popularized by Mike Mentzer and later Dorian Yates) was one set of a weight training exercise to all out muscular failure. This was "intense" because you were literally working until your body failed.

A 36" box jump would be more "intense" than a 28" box jump because it'd be nearer to your max.

A 5-minute mile would be more "intense" than a 6-minute mile because it's nearer to your best possible time.

And so on.

HIIT came about when exercise scientists found that trainees working near their absolute physical limit would create some pretty profound physical effects in the body.

The obvious example here is Dr. Izumi Tabata, who created the 8 rounds x 20 secs on / 10 secs off routine.

Everyone thinks that the "secret sauce" was in the routine itself - it wasn't. The routine was just a way that he could have Olympic speed skaters (i.e. - some of the best / most physically capable athletes in all of Japan) reaching VO2 max and above.

People like to cite Tabata's intervals, but then never take into account that his speed skaters were working at 180% of Vo2 max in his original study (not to mention doing a decent amount of submaximal work for more volume, too). THAT is where their physical adaptation came from - the 8 x 20/10 was just a method to get there.

This, by the way, is why any time you see someone doing dipshittery like Tabata Pushups, they're getting it COMPLETELY wrong.

Somewhere along the way, the term HIIT was born and people focused on the "intervals" more than they did the "high intensity".

They also didn't take into account what "high intensity" actually meant...just because you're working hard, that doesn't mean you're "high intensity".

(Which is why something like Tabata Burpees is also a dumb idea, even though it'll tucker you out.)

Also along the way, youtube fitness people (and other workout industry quasi-guru cool kid wannabes) took to calling circuit training and complexes "HIIT"...often because they were setting timers and doing exercises for rounds and such.

Those hot chicks you see on IG and youtube and all that doing 45-minute long workouts with bodyweight exercises and light sandbags and shit? They might be difficult. They might be exhausting. They might even work.

But they're not "HIIT".

Which is where the rub comes from.

Because if nothing else, the term HIIT should really only apply to cardiovascular activity and not the circuit / complex type workouts.

As far as programming and periodization and all that, yes - you still need that and doing complex / circuit type workouts (which really are my specialty) require it as much as any strength training program, hypertrophy workout, or anything else. Just randomly throwing shit together is gonna end up leading to overtraining some muscles / movement patterns, undertraining others, muscular imbalances, etc.

So anyway...that's that.

Oh, and as far as EPOC being overrated goes (just because I mentioned it)...the whole "afterburn" thing people think they're gonna get is one of the most overblown ideas & concepts in the entire fitness industry.

If you do HIIT (think on an exercise bike, sprinting, skiing simulator, etc), you're gonna burn MAYBE an additional 14% within the next 24-36 hours.

That means if you burned 600 calories in a workout (which, let's be honest, would be a LOT), your "afterburn" effect via EPOC is gonna burn an additional 84 calories over the next 1-1.5 days.

whoop-dee-fucking do

And when you consider that HIIT...IF DONE CORRECTLY...has to be done for a short period of time (so as to keep intensity up since intensity and duration are inversely proportional), you're not gonna burn that many calories during the workout in the first place...which lessens the "afterburn" even more.

As far as the energy system effects HIIT can have, those are legit. But again - ONLY if you're capable of working hard enough...which most people aren't.

And all that is still a completely different ballgame than complex / circuit type training (which are often erroneously called HIIT), which is what OP was asking about in the first place.
6 days ago
3/20/15
Posts: 12145

I can tell all of you this, from 44 years experience......what works for 1 dude does not work for another dude...so there....

All these online fitness gurus soak people for millions, and the people don't realize that one program does not....I repeat, does not work for all....

6 days ago
6/26/06
Posts: 123841
Wiggy -
Girly - 
Wiggy - HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.

As a bootcamper still (not as often) and glformer Orangetheory and crossfitter, I can tell you wiggy knows his shit on all this from my other thread.    The lack of periodzation and randomness and yes either overtraining or overkill makes HIIT not as great as once thought.  At least not in manner it's being done and by who .   Longer rests and shorter bursts would be better 


Thanks for the props man, but it's really a different set of issues.

This is gonna sound like I'm being a semantics asshole, but the problem is that you've had people mis-using terms for so long that now when discussions are had with people that actually know what they mean (and speak of them appropriately), you end up having two people in the same conversation talking about two different things and they don't even realize it.

HIIT = High Intensity Interval Training

Long story short, it's a form of training where you're working at as high of an intensity as possible.

When people think "intensity" they think how hard you're working or how mean you are or whatever bro-tastic definition. The *actual* definition of "intensity" from an exercise science perspective is that one of capability.

Meaning the higher the "intensity", the nearer you're working toward your maximum capability - no matter what the of exercise.

Arthur Jones' HIT / High Intensity Training (popularized by Mike Mentzer and later Dorian Yates) was one set of a weight training exercise to all out muscular failure. This was "intense" because you were literally working until your body failed.

A 36" box jump would be more "intense" than a 28" box jump because it'd be nearer to your max.

A 5-minute mile would be more "intense" than a 6-minute mile because it's nearer to your best possible time.

And so on.

HIIT came about when exercise scientists found that trainees working near their absolute physical limit would create some pretty profound physical effects in the body.

The obvious example here is Dr. Izumi Tabata, who created the 8 rounds x 20 secs on / 10 secs off routine.

Everyone thinks that the "secret sauce" was in the routine itself - it wasn't. The routine was just a way that he could have Olympic speed skaters (i.e. - some of the best / most physically capable athletes in all of Japan) reaching VO2 max and above.

People like to cite Tabata's intervals, but then never take into account that his speed skaters were working at 180% of Vo2 max in his original study (not to mention doing a decent amount of submaximal work for more volume, too). THAT is where their physical adaptation came from - the 8 x 20/10 was just a method to get there.

This, by the way, is why any time you see someone doing dipshittery like Tabata Pushups, they're getting it COMPLETELY wrong.

Somewhere along the way, the term HIIT was born and people focused on the "intervals" more than they did the "high intensity".

They also didn't take into account what "high intensity" actually meant...just because you're working hard, that doesn't mean you're "high intensity".

(Which is why something like Tabata Burpees is also a dumb idea, even though it'll tucker you out.)

Also along the way, youtube fitness people (and other workout industry quasi-guru cool kid wannabes) took to calling circuit training and complexes "HIIT"...often because they were setting timers and doing exercises for rounds and such.

Those hot chicks you see on IG and youtube and all that doing 45-minute long workouts with bodyweight exercises and light sandbags and shit? They might be difficult. They might be exhausting. They might even work.

But they're not "HIIT".

Which is where the rub comes from.

Because if nothing else, the term HIIT should really only apply to cardiovascular activity and not the circuit / complex type workouts.

As far as programming and periodization and all that, yes - you still need that and doing complex / circuit type workouts (which really are my specialty) require it as much as any strength training program, hypertrophy workout, or anything else. Just randomly throwing shit together is gonna end up leading to overtraining some muscles / movement patterns, undertraining others, muscular imbalances, etc.

So anyway...that's that.

Oh, and as far as EPOC being overrated goes (just because I mentioned it)...the whole "afterburn" thing people think they're gonna get is one of the most overblown ideas & concepts in the entire fitness industry.

If you do HIIT (think on an exercise bike, sprinting, skiing simulator, etc), you're gonna burn MAYBE an additional 14% within the next 24-36 hours.

That means if you burned 600 calories in a workout (which, let's be honest, would be a LOT), your "afterburn" effect via EPOC is gonna burn an additional 84 calories over the next 1-1.5 days.

whoop-dee-fucking do

And when you consider that HIIT...IF DONE CORRECTLY...has to be done for a short period of time (so as to keep intensity up since intensity and duration are inversely proportional), you're not gonna burn that many calories during the workout in the first place...which lessens the "afterburn" even more.

As far as the energy system effects HIIT can have, those are legit. But again - ONLY if you're capable of working hard enough...which most people aren't.

And all that is still a completely different ballgame than complex / circuit type training (which are often erroneously called HIIT), which is what OP was asking about in the first place.

Agree with all of that.  

6 days ago
2/9/09
Posts: 9371
Wiggy -
Girly - 
Wiggy - HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.

As a bootcamper still (not as often) and glformer Orangetheory and crossfitter, I can tell you wiggy knows his shit on all this from my other thread.    The lack of periodzation and randomness and yes either overtraining or overkill makes HIIT not as great as once thought.  At least not in manner it's being done and by who .   Longer rests and shorter bursts would be better 


Thanks for the props man, but it's really a different set of issues.

This is gonna sound like I'm being a semantics asshole, but the problem is that you've had people mis-using terms for so long that now when discussions are had with people that actually know what they mean (and speak of them appropriately), you end up having two people in the same conversation talking about two different things and they don't even realize it.

HIIT = High Intensity Interval Training

Long story short, it's a form of training where you're working at as high of an intensity as possible.

When people think "intensity" they think how hard you're working or how mean you are or whatever bro-tastic definition. The *actual* definition of "intensity" from an exercise science perspective is that one of capability.

Meaning the higher the "intensity", the nearer you're working toward your maximum capability - no matter what the of exercise.

Arthur Jones' HIT / High Intensity Training (popularized by Mike Mentzer and later Dorian Yates) was one set of a weight training exercise to all out muscular failure. This was "intense" because you were literally working until your body failed.

A 36" box jump would be more "intense" than a 28" box jump because it'd be nearer to your max.

A 5-minute mile would be more "intense" than a 6-minute mile because it's nearer to your best possible time.

And so on.

HIIT came about when exercise scientists found that trainees working near their absolute physical limit would create some pretty profound physical effects in the body.

The obvious example here is Dr. Izumi Tabata, who created the 8 rounds x 20 secs on / 10 secs off routine.

Everyone thinks that the "secret sauce" was in the routine itself - it wasn't. The routine was just a way that he could have Olympic speed skaters (i.e. - some of the best / most physically capable athletes in all of Japan) reaching VO2 max and above.

People like to cite Tabata's intervals, but then never take into account that his speed skaters were working at 180% of Vo2 max in his original study (not to mention doing a decent amount of submaximal work for more volume, too). THAT is where their physical adaptation came from - the 8 x 20/10 was just a method to get there.

This, by the way, is why any time you see someone doing dipshittery like Tabata Pushups, they're getting it COMPLETELY wrong.

Somewhere along the way, the term HIIT was born and people focused on the "intervals" more than they did the "high intensity".

They also didn't take into account what "high intensity" actually meant...just because you're working hard, that doesn't mean you're "high intensity".

(Which is why something like Tabata Burpees is also a dumb idea, even though it'll tucker you out.)

Also along the way, youtube fitness people (and other workout industry quasi-guru cool kid wannabes) took to calling circuit training and complexes "HIIT"...often because they were setting timers and doing exercises for rounds and such.

Those hot chicks you see on IG and youtube and all that doing 45-minute long workouts with bodyweight exercises and light sandbags and shit? They might be difficult. They might be exhausting. They might even work.

But they're not "HIIT".

Which is where the rub comes from.

Because if nothing else, the term HIIT should really only apply to cardiovascular activity and not the circuit / complex type workouts.

As far as programming and periodization and all that, yes - you still need that and doing complex / circuit type workouts (which really are my specialty) require it as much as any strength training program, hypertrophy workout, or anything else. Just randomly throwing shit together is gonna end up leading to overtraining some muscles / movement patterns, undertraining others, muscular imbalances, etc.

So anyway...that's that.

Oh, and as far as EPOC being overrated goes (just because I mentioned it)...the whole "afterburn" thing people think they're gonna get is one of the most overblown ideas & concepts in the entire fitness industry.

If you do HIIT (think on an exercise bike, sprinting, skiing simulator, etc), you're gonna burn MAYBE an additional 14% within the next 24-36 hours.

That means if you burned 600 calories in a workout (which, let's be honest, would be a LOT), your "afterburn" effect via EPOC is gonna burn an additional 84 calories over the next 1-1.5 days.

whoop-dee-fucking do

And when you consider that HIIT...IF DONE CORRECTLY...has to be done for a short period of time (so as to keep intensity up since intensity and duration are inversely proportional), you're not gonna burn that many calories during the workout in the first place...which lessens the "afterburn" even more.

As far as the energy system effects HIIT can have, those are legit. But again - ONLY if you're capable of working hard enough...which most people aren't.

And all that is still a completely different ballgame than complex / circuit type training (which are often erroneously called HIIT), which is what OP was asking about in the first place.

So pretty much quality over quantity

6 days ago
7/24/16
Posts: 4982
Wiggy -
Girly - 
Wiggy - HIT and HIIT aren't the same thing.

EPOC is overrated.

Most people aren't in good enough shape (physically or mentally) to do HIIT correctly.

Intervals doesn't automatically = HIIT.

Most people you see prescribing HIIT aren't even doing HIIT (youtube workout people, I'm looking at you, here).

You can get jacked as fuck on properly-designed complex / circuit training programs.

As a bootcamper still (not as often) and glformer Orangetheory and crossfitter, I can tell you wiggy knows his shit on all this from my other thread.    The lack of periodzation and randomness and yes either overtraining or overkill makes HIIT not as great as once thought.  At least not in manner it's being done and by who .   Longer rests and shorter bursts would be better 


Thanks for the props man, but it's really a different set of issues.

This is gonna sound like I'm being a semantics asshole, but the problem is that you've had people mis-using terms for so long that now when discussions are had with people that actually know what they mean (and speak of them appropriately), you end up having two people in the same conversation talking about two different things and they don't even realize it.

HIIT = High Intensity Interval Training

Long story short, it's a form of training where you're working at as high of an intensity as possible.

When people think "intensity" they think how hard you're working or how mean you are or whatever bro-tastic definition. The *actual* definition of "intensity" from an exercise science perspective is that one of capability.

Meaning the higher the "intensity", the nearer you're working toward your maximum capability - no matter what the of exercise.

Arthur Jones' HIT / High Intensity Training (popularized by Mike Mentzer and later Dorian Yates) was one set of a weight training exercise to all out muscular failure. This was "intense" because you were literally working until your body failed.

A 36" box jump would be more "intense" than a 28" box jump because it'd be nearer to your max.

A 5-minute mile would be more "intense" than a 6-minute mile because it's nearer to your best possible time.

And so on.

HIIT came about when exercise scientists found that trainees working near their absolute physical limit would create some pretty profound physical effects in the body.

The obvious example here is Dr. Izumi Tabata, who created the 8 rounds x 20 secs on / 10 secs off routine.

Everyone thinks that the "secret sauce" was in the routine itself - it wasn't. The routine was just a way that he could have Olympic speed skaters (i.e. - some of the best / most physically capable athletes in all of Japan) reaching VO2 max and above.

People like to cite Tabata's intervals, but then never take into account that his speed skaters were working at 180% of Vo2 max in his original study (not to mention doing a decent amount of submaximal work for more volume, too). THAT is where their physical adaptation came from - the 8 x 20/10 was just a method to get there.

This, by the way, is why any time you see someone doing dipshittery like Tabata Pushups, they're getting it COMPLETELY wrong.

Somewhere along the way, the term HIIT was born and people focused on the "intervals" more than they did the "high intensity".

They also didn't take into account what "high intensity" actually meant...just because you're working hard, that doesn't mean you're "high intensity".

(Which is why something like Tabata Burpees is also a dumb idea, even though it'll tucker you out.)

Also along the way, youtube fitness people (and other workout industry quasi-guru cool kid wannabes) took to calling circuit training and complexes "HIIT"...often because they were setting timers and doing exercises for rounds and such.

Those hot chicks you see on IG and youtube and all that doing 45-minute long workouts with bodyweight exercises and light sandbags and shit? They might be difficult. They might be exhausting. They might even work.

But they're not "HIIT".

Which is where the rub comes from.

Because if nothing else, the term HIIT should really only apply to cardiovascular activity and not the circuit / complex type workouts.

As far as programming and periodization and all that, yes - you still need that and doing complex / circuit type workouts (which really are my specialty) require it as much as any strength training program, hypertrophy workout, or anything else. Just randomly throwing shit together is gonna end up leading to overtraining some muscles / movement patterns, undertraining others, muscular imbalances, etc.

So anyway...that's that.

Oh, and as far as EPOC being overrated goes (just because I mentioned it)...the whole "afterburn" thing people think they're gonna get is one of the most overblown ideas & concepts in the entire fitness industry.

If you do HIIT (think on an exercise bike, sprinting, skiing simulator, etc), you're gonna burn MAYBE an additional 14% within the next 24-36 hours.

That means if you burned 600 calories in a workout (which, let's be honest, would be a LOT), your "afterburn" effect via EPOC is gonna burn an additional 84 calories over the next 1-1.5 days.

whoop-dee-fucking do

And when you consider that HIIT...IF DONE CORRECTLY...has to be done for a short period of time (so as to keep intensity up since intensity and duration are inversely proportional), you're not gonna burn that many calories during the workout in the first place...which lessens the "afterburn" even more.

As far as the energy system effects HIIT can have, those are legit. But again - ONLY if you're capable of working hard enough...which most people aren't.

And all that is still a completely different ballgame than complex / circuit type training (which are often erroneously called HIIT), which is what OP was asking about in the first place.

Great post. 

In regards to HIT, I always suspected Mentzer was full of shit or at the very least over exagexaggerating his lack of volume in an attempt to stand out. A marketing ploy more or less, though I can't see where he reaped any kind of financial windfall from it. Even Dorian's style of HIT incorporated multiple "warmup" sets, which were much more than your standard 135 lbs. on the flat bench for example, before a set to failure which oftentimes included drop sets and forced reps. Far from the one heavy set to failure that Mentzer preached.

Edited: 5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 21268
GoffRAMSmahome'sgutsOUT - 

Great post. 

In regards to HIT, I always suspected Mentzer was full of shit or at the very least over exagexaggerating his lack of volume in an attempt to stand out. A marketing ploy more or less, though I can't see where he reaped any kind of financial windfall from it. Even Dorian's of HIT incorporated multiple "warmup" sets, which were much more than your standard 135 lbs. on the flat bench for example, before a set to failure which oftentimes included drop sets and forced reps. Far from the one heavy set to failure that Mentzer preached.


Thanks - I appreciate it.

Re Mike - I'll be honest...I don't know. I feel he had pretty good genetics (his brother Ray got almost as jacked as Mike did back in the day, using Mike's methods). I don't think he was necessarily a volume guy masquerading as an HITer, but it wouldn't surprise me if he did more volume than he let on.

Maybe not a la Dorian (i.e. - several "warmup" sets, then your HIT set), but maybe via doing multiple exercises per body part, when he mostly recommended just one. Who knows.

The thing about Dorian is that he was able to really push his version of HIT to the max because he was the first guy that REALLY started pushing the PED limits. It's not that guys weren't on 'em, because they were. But even Haney wasn't a crazy user.

You can directly trace the beginning of the era of mass monsters that are in bodybuilding today back to Dorian in the mid '90s.

Th

EDIT - just realized like 2/3 of my post got cut off for some unknown reason...this stupid fucking site.

I'll come back later & try to finish this off.

5 days ago
3/5/14
Posts: 13206

I agree with Wiggy on all he's said.  To bring it back to the OP, though.  Even though what you're describing Kennedy doing is not HIIT, which Wiggy already addressed, the answer to if one is able to build muscle using a lot of lifting complexes completely depends on if the stress being dosed by said exercises is enough to elicit an adaptation and cause muscle growth.  A completely untrained individual would build at least some muscle from pretty much anything he/she did because almost anything would be more than what he/she was doing previously. 

If you're talking about an already strong and fit person, it just depends on if the specific stress being dosed is enough to illicit an adaptive response which depends on the relative volume and intensity of the complexes being used.  Its also possible that complexes are not meant to drive muscular adaptation and are more being used for aerobic conditioning.  You would probably have to ask Kennedy what his goals are.   Its also worth noting that people who are already in excellent cardiovascular shape will be able to work at a much higher intensity while doing lots of work stacked up with little rest in between when compared to a non-well trained person.

What causes a weak out of shape person to get tired and exhausted may be nothing for a strong in shape person.  Its all relative.

 

5 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 6021

for losing weight and get a nice toned body. interval training is the shit. however its not for anyone. its tough as hell. it builds stronger heart and lungs, stronger muscle endurance. however i build my own version of interval training. some have crazy results.

4 days ago
7/6/14
Posts: 3758

Something that a few trainers do say is hiit is literally ALL out.... So make sure to do it after weights BUT if you go all out on hiit your nervous system "should" be pretty jacked the rest of the day...meaning you may have issues just freaking getting up and doing everyday physical activity which really could counter productive as terms as your TOTAL calorie burning... Meaning if you burn 200 Cals plus let's say 200 for the epoc burn whatever that's 400 but u will be exhausted...but if you do liss and can do 600 Cals and still walk around or take the dog on a walk or whatever you will end up in better shape doing liss.... I experienced this when I was doing hiit 4 to 5 days a week ..my legs would be shot the rest of the day and I didn't feel like doing shit ....little things like walking around or lifting throughout the day actually add up in Cals