OtherGround Forums The 9/11 memorial in NYC...

9 days ago
5/7/08
Posts: 22070

Posted about this in my NYC thread, but figured this was a good time for this. Anyone been to the memorial pools? I was there in July, everyone in the city was humming and buzzing but the pools have a completely vibe around them. It's very somber, heavy. Not sure how to describe it really, but it feels like there's something in the air there. Very sobering reading all the names of those who died that day...

9 days ago
4/1/10
Posts: 60083

The pools are beautiful.

I always think it is odd that people take selfies and family photos infront of them. I am not judging or think they shouldn't, it is just weird to me. I remember standing there when the rubble was still smoking like it was yesterday.

The whole neighborhood is pretty great now.

I haven't been to the museum. Don't want to do it. They play some of the voicemails and stuff and I know a few of them. I don't have the stomach for it.

There is also a bunch of trade tickets from Cantor and Alger.

Not for me.

9 days ago
12/18/03
Posts: 25077

I always think it is odd that people take selfies and family photos infront of them. I am not judging or think they shouldn't, it is just weird to me. I remember standing there when the rubble was still smoking like it was yesterday.

I believe a lot of visitors, especially non-Americans, never felt the impact of that day as deeply - Some were possibly very young when that happened...

I got to visit before and afterward everything was built, and to me it feels a lot more like an assertive "see how we deal with this?" than a memorial. 

9 days ago
4/20/11
Posts: 18236

In 

9 days ago
5/20/19
Posts: 2543


Pic I took of the 9/11 Empty Sky memorial on the Jersey Side of the bay.
9 days ago
9/25/09
Posts: 9083

I went down to ground zero about a month after. On the way back from college.  I had taken the Amtrak from Hartford to Grand central and figured I should go down and just pay some respect.  I had known some people from my town who passed away.  Awful.  It still smelled like smoke and debris.  And there were barriers up and thousands of pictures of “missing” people who were obviously gone.  I saw an Asian group of people taking pictures and I was fuming until I saw a cop standing there.  He saw me staring at them and he looked at them all for a moment as well.  Then he looked back at me and leaned over and said “They don’t know.  Some people don’t know.”  And it made me realize that some people want to take that picture because they know something is important even if it’s fucking disgusting.  So when people go to ground zero and the reflecting pools and the museum and have pictures I try not to take offense to it.  They don’t know.  

9 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 17813

Haunting place. Very heavy.

9 days ago
6/1/10
Posts: 15312
TheHouse -

I went down to ground zero about a month after. On the way back from college.  I had taken the Amtrak from Hartford to Grand central and figured I should go down and just pay some respect.  I had known some people from my town who passed away.  Awful.  It still smelled like smoke and debris.  And there were barriers up and thousands of pictures of “missing” people who were obviously gone.  I saw an Asian group of people taking pictures and I was fuming until I saw a cop standing there.  He saw me staring at them and he looked at them all for a moment as well.  Then he looked back at me and leaned over and said “They don’t know.  Some people don’t know.”  And it made me realize that some people want to take that picture because they know something is important even if it’s fucking disgusting.  So when people go to ground zero and the reflecting pools and the museum and have pictures I try not to take offense to it.  They don’t know.  

I think you may be mistaken on your timeline.

Ground Zero was still closed to the public in October 2001.

My mother lived on Chambers and could not get into her apartment until November

9 days ago
12/15/02
Posts: 19639

i pass through the station every day.

 

such a weird feeling but at the same time, its not. hard to describe, its a very new york thing.

9 days ago
12/17/06
Posts: 77771

I still haven't been. It'd just piss me off. And I second Ned's words on the museum. I don't need to hear those voicemails. I knew people in there too. I'd lose my shit.

Edited: 9 days ago
4/6/19
Posts: 2039

there's a memorial of pictures posted outside of those who didn't come back... really conveys the human aspect of guys who willingly went in

 

 

 

9 days ago
2/11/11
Posts: 1142

I went to the memorial last year for the first time. It freaked me out. I went to the observatory as a kid at the top of the towers, and to just see something that big completely gone shook me. I actually got more emotional when I went to ground zero about 2 years after it happened when I was a freshman at Fordham. We could see the smoke from my high school in CT

9 days ago
10/5/04
Posts: 2010

Concerning those who haven't gone because they don't want to hear the voices or don't have the stomach for it.

That is exactly the reason you should go.

those people stomached it. The families did. The surviver wives had to stomach it.

The children had to stomach it.

 You need to go if only to carry some of the weight for them or with them.

Go.

9 days ago
4/6/19
Posts: 2043

 

9 days ago
9/25/09
Posts: 9085
AlphaSlap -
TheHouse -

I went down to ground zero about a month after. On the way back from college.  I had taken the Amtrak from Hartford to Grand central and figured I should go down and just pay some respect.  I had known some people from my town who passed away.  Awful.  It still smelled like smoke and debris.  And there were barriers up and thousands of pictures of “missing” people who were obviously gone.  I saw an Asian group of people taking pictures and I was fuming until I saw a cop standing there.  He saw me staring at them and he looked at them all for a moment as well.  Then he looked back at me and leaned over and said “They don’t know.  Some people don’t know.”  And it made me realize that some people want to take that picture because they know something is important even if it’s fucking disgusting.  So when people go to ground zero and the reflecting pools and the museum and have pictures I try not to take offense to it.  They don’t know.  

I think you may be mistaken on your timeline.

Ground Zero was still closed to the public in October 2001.

My mother lived on Chambers and could not get into her apartment until November

I think my wording is confusing.  I shouldn’t have said ground zero.  I meant as far down south as I could have walked down to.  Probably north of chambers at the time but I have no idea of exact street.   Wherever the barriers and fencing used to stop people from walking down to the site.  It also could have been late October or early November.  

8 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 7289

I was down there last year after going to the consulate for Trinidad. My and my fiance walked over there and I hadn't been in the city since I worked there. The vibe is very different and just knowing the towers was there and aren't now is a little hard to get your head around but it was impressive seeing the pools.

8 days ago
5/7/08
Posts: 22071

Glad to see I'm not the only one who felt it. I went to NY when I was 18 in 2005 and again in 2006, but I'm not sure if that stuff was all finished yet. Either way, we didn't go anywhere near that area those times. Now 13 years later I'm glad I went to see it. It was honestly like a bubble, that whole area seems isolated from the noise of the city, like you subconsciously block it out. We also went to the top of One World, that was very cool as well.

8 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 4494
TheHouse - 

I went down to ground zero about a month after. On the way back from college.  I had taken the Amtrak from Hartford to Grand central and figured I should go down and just pay some respect.  I had known some people from my town who passed away.  Awful.  It still smelled like smoke and debris.  And there were barriers up and thousands of pictures of “missing” people who were obviously gone.  I saw an Asian group of people taking pictures and I was fuming until I saw a cop standing there.  He saw me staring at them and he looked at them all for a moment as well.  Then he looked back at me and leaned over and said “They don’t know.  Some people don’t know.”  And it made me realize that some people want to take that picture because they know something is important even if it’s fucking disgusting.  So when people go to ground zero and the reflecting pools and the museum and have pictures I try not to take offense to it.  They don’t know.  


People just don't know, especially tourists, or people who were too young or not even born when it all happpenned.
 
I went with my wife after like 15 years (we live 40 miles away)to see the pools and it was getting on my nerves seeing people taking selfies and smiling..etc, as if they weren't standing literally on a spot where nearly 3,000 were essentially murdered.  
 
But i realized that most don't know or are/were too far removed from it, due to distance, time, or both.  People go to Gettysburg, Normandy, Pearl Harbor, Auschewitz...etc or places in other countries where horrible acts have happened and to most (even us) it's just a place that they read about in a book.
 
People are always going to be people.
8 days ago
4/11/06
Posts: 4946

I remember going there around April 2002. It was whenever they had the beams of light going. The rest of the city was freezing except for over there. It was extra quiet and there was no wind or anything passing through

8 days ago
9/25/09
Posts: 9086
SlapUsilly -
TheHouse - 

I went down to ground zero about a month after. On the way back from college.  I had taken the Amtrak from Hartford to Grand central and figured I should go down and just pay some respect.  I had known some people from my town who passed away.  Awful.  It still smelled like smoke and debris.  And there were barriers up and thousands of pictures of “missing” people who were obviously gone.  I saw an Asian group of people taking pictures and I was fuming until I saw a cop standing there.  He saw me staring at them and he looked at them all for a moment as well.  Then he looked back at me and leaned over and said “They don’t know.  Some people don’t know.”  And it made me realize that some people want to take that picture because they know something is important even if it’s fucking disgusting.  So when people go to ground zero and the reflecting pools and the museum and have pictures I try not to take offense to it.  They don’t know.  


People just don't know, especially tourists, or people who were too young or not even born when it all happpenned.
 
I went with my wife after like 15 years (we live 40 miles away)to see the pools and it was getting on my nerves seeing people taking selfies and smiling..etc, as if they weren't standing literally on a spot where nearly 3,000 were essentially murdered.  
 
But i realized that most don't know or are/were too far removed from it, due to distance, time, or both.  People go to Gettysburg, Normandy, Pearl Harbor, Auschewitz...etc or places in other countries where horrible acts have happened and to most (even us) it's just a place that they read about in a book.
 
People are always going to be people.

As I’ve gotten older I really try not to be bothered by it and I didn’t want my post to sound rude at all.  People should go wherever they want and as long as they aren’t disrespectful they can take pictures or selfies or anything if they want.  I shouldn’t judge them for just experiencing history.  I personally don’t want to go down to the reflecting pools although from every photo I’ve seen, they look spectacular and an almost perfect artistic rememberence of the day. But it’s just not for me emotionally.

8 days ago
2/23/12
Posts: 14634

Taking a selfie there seems really obviously inappropriate regardless of how old you were when it happened, I can see taking a picture but you don’t need to be in it like it’s a tourist attraction. Does that happen at auschwitz? 

8 days ago
5/7/08
Posts: 22073

I really don't see the issue with taking a selfie at the pools. A selfie in itself isn't disrespectful. People want to remember their trip to NY, let them take pictures. I don't recall taking any pics at all at the pools and I certainly didn't take any selfies, but to me it's not disrespectful to do so.

8 days ago
10/5/04
Posts: 2012

People are vastly respectable while there. 

I saw a guy...30ish? yuppieish?? Sitting ON the pool wall...On someone's name..just chillin'

I said -hey get off that- someone died there.  And he jumped off right away and said sorry. 

8 days ago
6/26/06
Posts: 12159
Sadly it will most likely be dismantled in 40-50 years and a monument to the hijackers will take its place.
8 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 4495
Jored1990 - 

Taking a selfie there seems really obviously inappropriate regardless of how old you were when it happened, I can see taking a picture but you don’t need to be in it like it’s a tourist attraction. Does that happen at auschwitz? 


It does. And it's still inapropiate.

Good luck forcing people to not do it though.

Like I said, people are going to people.