OtherGround Forums The reason Kobe's helicopter crashed, new details

24 days ago
11/9/05
Posts: 30043
thedogofdogs -
itskrisdude -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

lol, no.

Like the guy who actually knows what he's talking about explained, most people in that industry believe spatial disorientation is to blame. It's physiological response that causes your instincts to lie.

I'll be proven right in the end, they dont drop like that, unless there is mechanical failure.

Amazing.

24 days ago
11/18/15
Posts: 5738
pfsjkd -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

If it was 'main rotor failure' at the altitude where it started to descend, the debris would be scattered over a much wider area. The rotors would have come down away from the main wreckage. Nobody has said this is a possibility. 

if he was disoriented and the helicopter was destabilized it could lead to unloading the rotor system, not usually a thing under normal operations with a fully articulated rotor head but with the kinetic energy the ship was carrying I would have to see an engineering report that shows the math to eliminate the possibility.  "mast bumping" on a fully articulated rotor head doesn't have the same risk of catastrophic failure as a semi rigid rotor head but you can break stuff unloading the disc on a 76

24 days ago
12/15/11
Posts: 27904

There was a copter wreck similiar when i was in the Army, the cause was mechanical failure, the main rotor lost power while the tail rotor continued, the copter dropped nose first, killing everyone aboard.

24 days ago
1/9/02
Posts: 50475

source that it dropped that fast?

 

I thought they lost radar contact? there were no recording devices on the heli. where did that info come from?

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43554
Cuckoldberry Finn -
pfsjkd -

"but he clearly was not flying in special vfr conditions."

There is no visibility limit for SVFR for helicopters. That being said, pilots have to use good judgement about whether it's safe or not safe to go. 

I am familiar with 91.157 from a fixed wing standpoint and I have a feeling that the lawyers will be arguing over the difference between fog and a cloud and use 91.157(b)(2) as their argument as that does apply to helicopters

Ok I get it. Yes. At the last he may not have been flying clear of clouds. But when he took off and was operating with Burbank's Class D, he most likely was. Special V is not dangerous in and of itself, but people are acting as if it is. That's the part I was saying people were making too much of a fuss about. 

24 days ago
12/15/11
Posts: 27905

^ the news conference. 

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43555
thedogofdogs -
itskrisdude -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

lol, no.

Like the guy who actually knows what he's talking about explained, most people in that industry believe spatial disorientation is to blame. It's physiological response that causes your instincts to lie.

I'll be proven right in the end, they dont drop like that, unless there is mechanical failure.

As a helicopter pilot with over 6000 hours you're absolutely wrong that 'main rotor failure' is the only reason it could drop that fast. 

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43556
gregbrady -

source that it dropped that fast?

 

I thought they lost radar contact? there were no recording devices on the heli. where did that info come from?

I believe the preliminary radar info shows the aircraft descending at 4000 ft/min at the end. 

24 days ago
1/24/17
Posts: 1535
kingofpancakes80 -
billyball2 - RIP

Parents and children dies in a helicopter accident.

The sooner the media and random internet posters stop providing updates the sooner the families can move on.


Oh god, I hope Vanessa doesn't see this!

 

You are a dumb faggot.

Doubt Vanessa is on the OG

24 days ago
11/18/15
Posts: 5739
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

24 days ago
11/18/15
Posts: 5740
pfsjkd -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
pfsjkd -

"but he clearly was not flying in special vfr conditions."

There is no visibility limit for SVFR for helicopters. That being said, pilots have to use good judgement about whether it's safe or not safe to go. 

I am familiar with 91.157 from a fixed wing standpoint and I have a feeling that the lawyers will be arguing over the difference between fog and a cloud and use 91.157(b)(2) as their argument as that does apply to helicopters

Ok I get it. Yes. At the last he may not have been flying clear of clouds. But when he took off and was operating with Burbank's Class D, he most likely was. Special V is not dangerous in and of itself, but people are acting as if it is. That's the part I was saying people were making too much of a fuss about. 

I agree 100 percent.  i dont like special vfr but we use it, but we are either ifr or vfr, our company ops limits dont allow us to switch in between for this exact reason.  it is the transition from special vfr to inadvertent imc that kills over and over again.  icing is the same way, everybody knows, people still fuck it up

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43557
Cuckoldberry Finn -
pfsjkd -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

If it was 'main rotor failure' at the altitude where it started to descend, the debris would be scattered over a much wider area. The rotors would have come down away from the main wreckage. Nobody has said this is a possibility. 

if he was disoriented and the helicopter was destabilized it could lead to unloading the rotor system, not usually a thing under normal operations with a fully articulated rotor head but with the kinetic energy the ship was carrying I would have to see an engineering report that shows the math to eliminate the possibility.  "mast bumping" on a fully articulated rotor head doesn't have the same risk of catastrophic failure as a semi rigid rotor head but you can break stuff unloading the disc on a 76

It's unlikely that he could have done something to massively over speed the head to the point of failure. If the autorational RPM were drastically set wrong, MAYBE he could have done it. But now you're starting to add up a bunch of other shit that would need to have happened prior to the mishap flight. The most likely scenario is spatial disorientation. 

24 days ago
12/29/09
Posts: 29379
NorthSouthDinner4Two - 
kingofpancakes80 -
billyball2 - RIP

Parents and children dies in a helicopter accident.

The sooner the media and random internet posters stop providing updates the sooner the families can move on.


Oh god, I hope Vanessa doesn't see this!

 

You are a dumb faggot.

Doubt Vanessa is on the OG


If she is.....I'm available. When she's ready to get back in the saddle. I'm sorry Jesus.

24 days ago
12/10/09
Posts: 18266
kungfugrip -
jasperb -

I read that the pilot suggested landed because of the fog but Kobe said no, have no idea if that is credible. 

Let's hope this is not true for the pilots sake. 

Survivor told that story?

24 days ago
12/15/11
Posts: 27906
Cuckoldberry Finn -
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

The wreck when i was in, they said it was mechanical failure, grounded the fleet, changed some of training schedule.

You guys trying to blame the pilot, when you have no evidence is sad.

Things break, the gentleman was a very experienced pilot, not one who would lose control, unless something had gone wrong with the chopper itself.

24 days ago
11/18/15
Posts: 5741
pfsjkd -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
pfsjkd -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

If it was 'main rotor failure' at the altitude where it started to descend, the debris would be scattered over a much wider area. The rotors would have come down away from the main wreckage. Nobody has said this is a possibility. 

if he was disoriented and the helicopter was destabilized it could lead to unloading the rotor system, not usually a thing under normal operations with a fully articulated rotor head but with the kinetic energy the ship was carrying I would have to see an engineering report that shows the math to eliminate the possibility.  "mast bumping" on a fully articulated rotor head doesn't have the same risk of catastrophic failure as a semi rigid rotor head but you can break stuff unloading the disc on a 76

It's unlikely that he could have done something to massively over speed the head to the point of failure. If the autorational RPM were drastically set wrong, MAYBE he could have done it. But now you're starting to add up a bunch of other shit that would need to have happened prior to the mishap flight. The most likely scenario is spatial disorientation. 

it was 100 percent spatial disorientation

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43558
thedogofdogs -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

The wreck when i was in, they said it was mechanical failure, grounded the fleet, changed some of training schedule.

You guys trying to blame the pilot, when you have no evidence is sad.

Things break, the gentleman was a very experienced pilot, not one who would lose control, unless something had gone wrong with the chopper itself.

Are you a pilot?? We're playing the odds, not tying to shit on the pilot. The facts are that pilot error accounts for the vast majority of aircraft mishaps. Mechanical failure accounts for much less. 
 

If he had mechanical failure he would have likely made a mayday call about it. He didn't. This suggests that he was fighting the aircraft himself.

24 days ago
2/5/05
Posts: 49753
scrapdo -
kungfugrip -
jasperb -

I read that the pilot suggested landed because of the fog but Kobe said no, have no idea if that is credible. 

Let's hope this is not true for the pilots sake. 

Survivor told that story?

100% bullshit. 

Edited: 24 days ago
11/18/15
Posts: 5742
thedogofdogs -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

The wreck when i was in, they said it was mechanical failure, grounded the fleet, changed some of training schedule.

You guys trying to blame the pilot, when you have no evidence is sad.

Things break, the gentleman was a very experienced pilot, not one who would lose control, unless something had gone wrong with the chopper itself.

statistically speaking pilots crash aircraft far more often than maintenance or parts crash aircraft because when that happens the whole fleet is grounded, it's fixed, and it stops happening.

 

the 76 has a metric ton of air worthiness directives and service bulletins for that exact reason, backed up by a long history of safe operation.  

mechanical failure leading to catastrophic loss of a ship is exceedingly rare.

I am interested in your experience though.  what kind of helicopter were you in?

23 days ago
9/20/19
Posts: 1423
GentileLarryDavid -
turducken -
billyball2 - RIP

Parents and children dies in a helicopter accident.

The sooner the media and random internet posters stop providing updates the sooner the families can move on.

They're not moving on any time soon. Media coverage will end looooong before that ever happens

Yeah, the family doesn't want to mourn, or carry memories with them.  They just want to move on.  Let's allow them to just get moving on.  

A billion people at least know who he is and the way he died is unique and likely preventable. That's part of celebrity. It comes with the territory. I'm sure Lisa Marie would have preferred people not know her dad died taking a shit. Only Regular guys get remembered in regular ways. 

23 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 47443
pfsjkd -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

If it was 'main rotor failure' at the altitude where it started to descend, the debris would be scattered over a much wider area. The rotors would have come down away from the main wreckage. Nobody has said this is a possibility. 

a dude that experienced would autorotate that fucker and land on a cunt hair

23 days ago
9/20/19
Posts: 1424
thedogofdogs -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

The wreck when i was in, they said it was mechanical failure, grounded the fleet, changed some of training schedule.

You guys trying to blame the pilot, when you have no evidence is sad.

Things break, the gentleman was a very experienced pilot, not one who would lose control, unless something had gone wrong with the chopper itself.

Dude, you're bringing up some random bullshit anecdote as legitimate arguments towards people who OBVIOUSLY have a very good idea what they are talking about. 

 

Shut it fuck up. You sound like a fucking moron. 

23 days ago
12/15/11
Posts: 27907
pfsjkd -
thedogofdogs -
Cuckoldberry Finn -
thedogofdogs -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

ive flown in over a 100 helicopters, the only reason you would drop that fast is mechanical failure.

The main rotor losing power.

 

well I'm beginning to question your experience.  if the main rotor simply loses power the descent is slowed by the helicopter falling from the sky.  when the main rotor loses power tou pick an airspeed and fly to it, since you dont have power you are falling.  as you are falling the air package you are descending through is spinning the rotors, think blowing on a fan.  when the aircraft is falling and the relative wind is driving the rotor system it causes the torque on the gearbox to reverse and there is a mechanism that decouples the main rotor from the drive system.  this is why autorotation works.

 

the 76 is an old design but only a total gearbox failure would realistically bring it down.  

 

if the pilot was disoriented he could have unknowingly ended up inverted, pulled the collective like you would usually do to climb and drive himself into the dirt.  there is case studies done on this exact thing were unintentional inversion has cause massive altitude losses in short periods of time

The wreck when i was in, they said it was mechanical failure, grounded the fleet, changed some of training schedule.

You guys trying to blame the pilot, when you have no evidence is sad.

Things break, the gentleman was a very experienced pilot, not one who would lose control, unless something had gone wrong with the chopper itself.

Are you a pilot?? We're playing the odds, not tying to shit on the pilot. The facts are that pilot error accounts for the vast majority of aircraft mishaps. Mechanical failure accounts for much less. 
 

If he had mechanical failure he would have likely made a mayday call about it. He didn't. This suggests that he was fighting the aircraft himself.

And when a friend of of one the family reads something like this, and passes it onto the family?

 

Have some class.

 

Theres 50 million other things you could be discussing.

 

No one knows until the official report comes out.

This is definitely one of the most classless threads ive ever seen on here.

23 days ago
1/17/03
Posts: 16696
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

That seems more likely then disorientation

Edited: 23 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 43560
Erik Apple -
thedogofdogs -
Erik Apple -
grenade whistle - Conditions were not suitable for flying, according to Los Angeles police who grounded their own choppers. But Kobe Bryant's pilot wanted to fly anyway and requested to abandon IFR (instrument flight rules) in favor of flying under visual flight rules (VFR), and ascended, or climbed to more than 2,000 feet, in what appeared to be an attempt to put some space between helicopter and terrain, and then crashed. He needed to climb to see what's below him BUT INSTEAD OF REVERTING TO IFR, HE CONTINUED FLYING UNDER VFR and this is why he crashed.

In addition to this, Kobe's helicopter was NOT equipped with TAWS (Terrain Avoidance Warning System). For years the NTSB has been recommending it on large passenger helicopters, but the FAA has not yet ordered it to be mandatory. The chopper did also not have black boxes, a cockpit voice or flight data recorder that could have provided critical information about why the pilot crashed. Kobe's helicopter was built in 1991 and his pilot had over 8,200 flying hours as of July 2019.

Flightradar24 visual map and last air traffic control


About TAWS technology

None of that explains why they dropped 1500 or 2000 feet in a minute or less....

Main rotor failure is the only reason.

 

That seems more likely then disorientation

Actually, it doesn't.