OtherGround Forums US says China military gather at Hong Kong border

7/31/19 11:01 PM
2/25/13
Posts: 26797

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 

8/1/19 12:03 AM
10/27/03
Posts: 24113
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.
8/1/19 12:10 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 25163
ttt
Edited: 8/1/19 12:22 AM
2/25/13
Posts: 26798
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china

8/1/19 12:50 AM
10/27/03
Posts: 24114
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.
Edited: 8/1/19 1:26 AM
2/25/13
Posts: 26799
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.

You talk like a mainlander. 

 

HK is a separate country that is now owned by China. Language is different. Laws are different, currency is different, the people are different. Freedoms are different. Passports are different. HK has recognized borders. HK competes as a individual country in events around the world. 

 

China also made an agreement with the British that China would allow HK to remain the same for decades (I forget the exact number of years) so China can't change the border without breaking that agreement 

Edited: 8/1/19 1:08 AM
4/6/19
Posts: 1482
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.

suck a dick ch1n4

8/1/19 1:25 AM
2/25/13
Posts: 26800
the chinese them selves call the places "port of entry"


"a port of entry (POE) is a place where one may lawfully enter a country. It typically has border security staff and facilities to check passports and visas, and inspect luggage to assure that contraband is not imported"
8/1/19 4:39 AM
10/27/03
Posts: 24115
Poiupoiu -
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.

You talk like a mainlander. 

 

HK is a separate country that is now owned by China. Language is different. Laws are different, currency is different, the people are different. Freedoms are different. Passports are different. HK has recognized borders. HK competes as a individual country in events around the world. 

 

China also made an agreement with the British that China would allow HK to remain the same for decades (I forget the exact number of years) so China can't change the border without breaking that agreement 

I never said otherwise. All those things are correct, except for HK being a seperate country.

It is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China that so far, they have allowed to keep the British systems that were put in place during the 150yrs Britain occupied it.

I believe the agreement on keeping the democratic systems in place was 50yrs. But the world didnt raise a peep with China militarising an island reef outside their jurisdiction.

Im not commenting on the right or wrong of it. But I’ve derailed this thread enough now.

Edited: 8/1/19 5:22 AM
2/25/13
Posts: 26802
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu -
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.

You talk like a mainlander. 

 

HK is a separate country that is now owned by China. Language is different. Laws are different, currency is different, the people are different. Freedoms are different. Passports are different. HK has recognized borders. HK competes as a individual country in events around the world. 

 

China also made an agreement with the British that China would allow HK to remain the same for decades (I forget the exact number of years) so China can't change the border without breaking that agreement 

I never said otherwise. All those things are correct, except for HK being a seperate country.

It is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China that so far, they have allowed to keep the British systems that were put in place during the 150yrs Britain occupied it.

I believe the agreement on keeping the democratic systems in place was 50yrs. But the world didnt raise a peep with China militarising an island reef outside their jurisdiction.

Im not commenting on the right or wrong of it. But I’ve derailed this thread enough now.

 

how many times have you crossed between China and HK?

 

Luohu port of entry and exit in Shenzhen China is considered the busiest border crossing in the world. And is operatied by the Bureau of Exit and Entry, it is an international border crossing

Edited: 8/1/19 5:32 AM
10/27/03
Posts: 24116
Poiupoiu -
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu -
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 
FingerorMoon - 
Poiupoiu - 

100% there is an international border crossing between China and HK 


Depends on how you define the word 'international' I guess. I define 'international' as when it is two seperate countries. This is not.
There is a border the Chinese government maintains and various levels of permits/regulations/visa are needed depending on who you are, where you enter/where you're going between the two.
Hong Kong is part of China. The British handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997 and China choose to allow it to run as a special administrative region.


its two different stamps (although HK doesnt stamp anymore)

you pass two different immigration points

China to HK
you must first go in the china immigration building
get a china stamp in your passport
exit china immigration building
walk a short distance through duty free shops
enter HK immigration building
get a HK stamp in your passport

chinese need a visa to go into hk
non-chinese need a visa to go into china


Yes. All correct.
Not an international border. It's an internal one between regions in China.
The Chinese government can change all that whenever they feel like it.

You talk like a mainlander. 

 

HK is a separate country that is now owned by China. Language is different. Laws are different, currency is different, the people are different. Freedoms are different. Passports are different. HK has recognized borders. HK competes as a individual country in events around the world. 

 

China also made an agreement with the British that China would allow HK to remain the same for decades (I forget the exact number of years) so China can't change the border without breaking that agreement 

I never said otherwise. All those things are correct, except for HK being a seperate country.

It is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China that so far, they have allowed to keep the British systems that were put in place during the 150yrs Britain occupied it.

I believe the agreement on keeping the democratic systems in place was 50yrs. But the world didnt raise a peep with China militarising an island reef outside their jurisdiction.

Im not commenting on the right or wrong of it. But I’ve derailed this thread enough now.

 

how many times have you crossed between China and HK?

 

Luohu port of entry and exit in Shenzhen China is considered the busiest border crossing in the world. And is operatied by the Bureau of Exit and Entry, it is an international border crossing

Twice (well once each way, not part of same trip)

Ive been to HK and China multiple times but not often moving from one to the other on the same trip.

8/1/19 7:39 AM
11/28/09
Posts: 39709

I’ll bet the UK is regretting that 99 year agreement  now!

8/1/19 7:58 AM
5/22/05
Posts: 23141
BonedByPicograms* -

I’ll bet the UK is regretting that 99 year agreement  now!

Hard to imagine a rising China would have tolerated uk holding on to hk permanently. 

8/1/19 8:42 AM
2/25/13
Posts: 26803
BonedByPicograms* - 

I’ll bet the UK is regretting that 99 year agreement  now!


the people of Hong Kong are regretting it more.

8/1/19 2:33 PM
1/1/01
Posts: 32525
amadeus - 
CRE - That's their area and we should stay out of it..right?

Yep... At the same time, the people cheering the decline of America should use this moment to take a hard look at who’s coming to take our place.


8/1/19 10:59 PM
2/25/13
Posts: 26817
chinese military release a propaganda video today, showing the troops fighting protesters
8/2/19 11:47 AM
12/23/05
Posts: 55
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 

some people think Hong Kong is in China, but there is actually an international border that seperates the two. now Chinese forces are gathering on the China side

---

White House Eyeing Chinese Forces Gathered on Hong Kong Border

July 31, 2019

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-07-30/white-house-eyeing-buildup-of-chinese-forces-on-hong-kong-border

The White House is monitoring what a senior administration official called a congregation of Chinese forces on Hong Kong’s border.

Weeks of unrest in the Chinese territory have begun to overwhelm Hong Kong’s police, who have found themselves in violent clashes with protesters. China warned Monday that the civil disorder had gone “far beyond” peaceful protest after police deployed tear gas over the weekend.

The nature of the Chinese buildup wasn’t clear; the official said that units of the Chinese military or armed police had gathered at the border with Hong Kong. The official briefed reporters on a range of issues on condition he not be identified.

Eurasia Group China analyst Andrew Coflan said he was taking the White House concerns “with a grain of salt” as it was unclear whether the White House was merely observing a large swearing-in ceremony of around 19,000 police personnel in China’s southern Guangdong province.

“I do not know if this is what they’re referring to, but if so this statement strikes me as needlessly escalatory,” Coflan said in an email. “Yes, there may be some signaling from China in the assembly of this many security forces in Guangdong, but that is far different than anti-riot troops marshaling in Shenzhen.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a briefing Wednesday that she was not aware of a situation on the border.

Under the Basic Law that governs Hong Kong, the maintenance of public order falls to local authorities, while China’s central government is responsible for the overall defense of the territory. Hong Kong can still ask Beijing “for assistance from the garrison in the maintenance of public order and in disaster relief.”

China’s People’s Liberation Army maintains a garrison of reportedly around 6,000 troops in Hong Kong, along with a naval squadron and a helicopter regiment. There are even more troops stationed just across the border in Shenzhen.


‘Right Thing’

The mainland government said Tuesday that violence in Hong Kong was a “creation of the U.S.,” a charge the administration official denied.

The developments come as President Donald Trump seeks a trade deal with China and just as the two nations resumed negotiations in Shanghai. Trump has spoken only sparingly about the protests, praising Chinese President Xi Jinping for his restraint. But it’s unclear how much planning the U.S. has done to prepare for possible Chinese military intervention in Hong Kong.

U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo urged the Chinese on Monday to “do the right thing” in managing the protests in Hong Kong, which began more than eight weeks ago, after the city-state’s executive, Carrie Lam, tried to win passage of a law allowing extraditions to the mainland.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying responded to Pompeo on Tuesday by blaming the U.S. for the protests.

“It’s clear that Mr. Pompeo has put himself in the wrong position and still regards himself as the head of the CIA,” Hua said, referring to Pompeo’s previous role at the intelligence agency. “He might think that violent activities in Hong Kong are reasonable because after all, this is the creation of the U.S.”

Pompeo, heading to a regional conference in Bangkok on Tuesday, responded mildly when asked by a reporter on his plane what he’d say to the Chinese foreign minister when they met at the event.

“With respect to Hong Kong, this is the people of Hong Kong asking their government to listen to them,” he said. “So it’s always appropriate for every government to listen to their people.”

Paul Sullivan, an international security expert at the National Defense University, said that China views the situation in terms of its long-term impact on the regime’s central power.

“The Chinese most likely have a very long-term perspective on this, and they aren’t going to be one China and two systems anymore,” Sullivan said. “My sense is that they want to completely chew up Hong Kong and make it part of the central part of China, maybe to improve their trading and economic base.”

Charles Lipson, a political science professor at the University of Chicago, said the U.S.’s options to intervene would be limited.

“There’s very little the U.S. can do, should do, or will want to do prior to a major crackdown,” Lipson said. “After which the U.S. will complain mightily but from the point of view of the U.S., there’s essentially nothing that can be done if the Chinese want to crack down on Hong Kong.”

 . . . . . . .



Hong Kong is part of China. There is no real international border between the two places.

There is the remanent of the old British border still in place that China still maintains because they choose to allow Hong Kong to be a special administrative region (SAR) and operate (mostly) with autonomy.
They can remove that any time they choose and roll their army through there legally any time they want.

The concern here is that they are obviously doing it now because they are sick of the protests and are going to crack down on it.

This is incorrect. HK is only partially a part of China. It has a semi autonomy under the 1 country 2 systems arrangement.

8/2/19 11:54 AM
12/23/05
Posts: 56
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.

8/2/19 2:46 PM
1/3/18
Posts: 5182
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

Not everybody. 

8/2/19 2:49 PM
6/13/03
Posts: 23454
fightingfit -
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.

i bet youe mom has bigger balls than you

8/2/19 2:58 PM
5/14/08
Posts: 10234
fightingfit - 
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.


Ahhhh so this is your go to troll line. Good to know thats all youre here for.

Edited: 8/2/19 9:39 PM
2/25/13
Posts: 26835
fightingfit - 
FingerorMoon -
Poiupoiu - 

some people think Hong Kong is in China, but there is actually an international border that seperates the two. now Chinese forces are gathering on the China side

---

July 31, 2019

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-07-30/white-house-eyeing-buildup-of-chinese-forces-on-hong-kong-border

The White House is monitoring what a senior administration official called a congregation of Chinese forces on Hong Kong’s border.

Weeks of unrest in the Chinese territory have begun to overwhelm Hong Kong’s police, who have found themselves in violent clashes with protesters. China warned Monday that the civil disorder had gone “far beyond” peaceful protest after police deployed tear gas over the weekend.

The nature of the Chinese buildup wasn’t clear; the official said that units of the Chinese military or armed police had gathered at the border with Hong Kong. The official briefed reporters on a range of issues on condition he not be identified.

Eurasia Group China analyst Andrew Coflan said he was taking the White House concerns “with a grain of salt” as it was unclear whether the White House was merely observing a large swearing-in ceremony of around 19,000 police personnel in China’s southern Guangdong province.

“I do not know if this is what they’re referring to, but if so this statement strikes me as needlessly escalatory,” Coflan said in an email. “Yes, there may be some signaling from China in the assembly of this many security forces in Guangdong, but that is far different than anti-riot troops marshaling in Shenzhen.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a briefing Wednesday that she was not aware of a situation on the border.

Under the Basic Law that governs Hong Kong, the maintenance of public order falls to local authorities, while China’s central government is responsible for the overall defense of the territory. Hong Kong can still ask Beijing “for assistance from the garrison in the maintenance of public order and in disaster relief.”

China’s People’s Liberation Army maintains a garrison of reportedly around 6,000 troops in Hong Kong, along with a naval squadron and a helicopter regiment. There are even more troops stationed just across the border in Shenzhen.


‘Right Thing’

The mainland government said Tuesday that violence in Hong Kong was a “creation of the U.S.,” a charge the administration official denied.

The developments come as President Donald Trump seeks a trade deal with China and just as the two nations resumed negotiations in Shanghai. Trump has spoken only sparingly about the protests, praising Chinese President Xi Jinping for his restraint. But it’s unclear how much planning the U.S. has done to prepare for possible Chinese military intervention in Hong Kong.

U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo urged the Chinese on Monday to “do the right thing” in managing the protests in Hong Kong, which began more than eight weeks ago, after the city-state’s executive, Carrie Lam, tried to win passage of a law allowing extraditions to the mainland.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying responded to Pompeo on Tuesday by blaming the U.S. for the protests.

“It’s clear that Mr. Pompeo has put himself in the wrong position and still regards himself as the head of the CIA,” Hua said, referring to Pompeo’s previous role at the intelligence agency. “He might think that violent activities in Hong Kong are reasonable because after all, this is the creation of the U.S.”

Pompeo, heading to a regional conference in Bangkok on Tuesday, responded mildly when asked by a reporter on his plane what he’d say to the Chinese foreign minister when they met at the event.

“With respect to Hong Kong, this is the people of Hong Kong asking their government to listen to them,” he said. “So it’s always appropriate for every government to listen to their people.”

Paul Sullivan, an international security expert at the National Defense University, said that China views the situation in terms of its long-term impact on the regime’s central power.

“The Chinese most likely have a very long-term perspective on this, and they aren’t going to be one China and two systems anymore,” Sullivan said. “My sense is that they want to completely chew up Hong Kong and make it part of the central part of China, maybe to improve their trading and economic base.”

Charles Lipson, a political science professor at the University of Chicago, said the U.S.’s options to intervene would be limited.

“There’s very little the U.S. can do, should do, or will want to do prior to a major crackdown,” Lipson said. “After which the U.S. will complain mightily but from the point of view of the U.S., there’s essentially nothing that can be done if the Chinese want to crack down on Hong Kong.”

 . . . . . . .



Hong Kong is part of China. There is no real international border between the two places.

There is the remanent of the old British border still in place that China still maintains because they choose to allow Hong Kong to be a special administrative region (SAR) and operate (mostly) with autonomy.
They can remove that any time they choose and roll their army through there legally any time they want.

The concern here is that they are obviously doing it now because they are sick of the protests and are going to crack down on it.

 

This is incorrect. HK is only partially a part of China. It has a semi autonomy under the 1 country 2 systems arrangement.

 

this.

 

plus the crossing is 100% identical to any border crossing in the world.

 . . . . .

 

8/2/19 10:22 PM
12/23/05
Posts: 61
Sogsteel -
fightingfit -
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.

i bet youe mom has bigger balls than you

What's " youe mom " ? You panicking or is that Yiddish ?

Edited: 8/2/19 10:25 PM
12/23/05
Posts: 62
Submissable -
fightingfit - 
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.

 

Ahhhh so this is your go to troll line. Good to know thats all youre here for.

 

Nah, just that the truth hurts doesn't it ?

8/2/19 10:33 PM
6/13/03
Posts: 23462
fightingfit -
Sogsteel -
fightingfit -
Sogsteel -

Are they kung fu fighting yet?

bet you're a gay liberal.

i bet youe mom has bigger balls than you

What's " youe mom " ? You panicking or is that Yiddish ?

You should tell mommy to teach you what a typo is during your next school session.