OtherGround Forums Wuhan Coronavirus daily update counts: 6,048,870

3/6/20 7:20 PM
4/19/09
Posts: 32962
clattymine -
Cire -

Coronavirus Cases:

100,242 

view by country

Deaths:

3,408

Recovered:

55,812

ACTIVE CASES 

41,022

Currently Infected Patients

34,742 (85%) 

in Mild Condition


6,280 (15%) 

Serious or Critica

We did it! 100k!!!!!

dont forget to like share subscribe and hit the bell

 

3/6/20 8:46 PM
1/1/01
Posts: 19634

Coronavirus Cases:

102,050 

view by country

Deaths:

3,494

Recovered:

57,611

ACTIVE CASES 

40,945

Currently Infected Patients

34,792 (85%) 

in Mild Condition


6,153 (15%) 

Serious or Critical


Show Graph

Jan 22Jan 26Jan 30Feb 03Feb 07Feb 11Feb 15Feb 19Feb 23Feb 27Mar 02Mar 06050k100k

Show Statistics

3/6/20 9:27 PM
4/21/09
Posts: 21780

Do we have any legit numbers on cases in the US and the death totals??

Edited: 3/6/20 9:53 PM
7/31/09
Posts: 6339
ABCTT_GROUNDnLB -

Active cases taking out China have skyrocketed over the past week.  Even if you take out Iran and China they have still doubled. 

Edited: 3/6/20 9:55 PM
1/7/09
Posts: 15664
Bam57Bam -

Do we have any legit numbers on cases in the US and the death totals??

317 cases and 16 deaths, although those numbers are quickly changing

3/6/20 9:57 PM
7/31/09
Posts: 6340
Bam57Bam -

Do we have any legit numbers on cases in the US and the death totals??

No because we haven't tested enough.  It's likely a good bit higher than the official totals.

3/6/20 9:58 PM
7/6/14
Posts: 3980

Seems like these hikes are getting bigger and more frequent.

3/7/20 12:46 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 4792
Trust -

Iran added 1200 cases in one day.  From 3500 to 4700 cases . . . in one day. 

They seem to be doing nothing to mitigate its spread. 

It's the difference between an organized and a disorganized authoritarian regime...

China closed off entire cities with military. In Iran it's traffic chaos because everyone is heading to the Caspian Sea for vacation, because schools and universities are closed.

3/7/20 12:48 AM
4/6/19
Posts: 4659
ziggystardust -
Trust -

Iran added 1200 cases in one day.  From 3500 to 4700 cases . . . in one day. 

They seem to be doing nothing to mitigate its spread. 

It's the difference between an organized and a disorganized authoritarian regime...

China closed off entire cities with military. In Iran it's traffic chaos because everyone is heading to the Caspian Sea for vacation, because schools and universities are closed.

which makes me wonder how India doesn't become covid19 super nova

3/7/20 1:21 AM
7/31/09
Posts: 6341

 

I think that's a decent spot to start listening to Pence

  • State labs can do their own testing now
  • Between March 2-5 distributed more than 900,000 tests across the country. Including 200,000 tests that would allow more than 75,000 individual patients to be tests. (If someone could clarify that statement for me that would be good because it is confusing)
  • They expect another 200,000 test to be shipped tomorrow and after the weekend another 1 million tests will be shipped around the country
  • By the end of next week they expect to have 4 million tests shipped
  • They are working with LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics to develop testing and expect those labs to have a test available by Monday
  • Continues to reiterate the risk is low, but if you are at risk or elderly then you need to take precautions especially with travel and cruises

Anthony Fauci gets on and begins by reiterating the risk to elderly and people with pre-existing conditions like heart and lung issues. He talks about social distancing as being key to minimizing risk and use social distancing if you plan to travel or be around large groups of people to help prevent this infection and other infections. He also points out that family members of people in those groups need to take care to minimize risk as well.

3/7/20 1:35 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 4796
Wayne Glamcock -
ziggystardust -
Trust -

Iran added 1200 cases in one day.  From 3500 to 4700 cases . . . in one day. 

They seem to be doing nothing to mitigate its spread. 

It's the difference between an organized and a disorganized authoritarian regime...

China closed off entire cities with military. In Iran it's traffic chaos because everyone is heading to the Caspian Sea for vacation, because schools and universities are closed.

which makes me wonder how India doesn't become covid19 super nova

It could still get there.

Or it's as someone else said, India is such a shithole it has diseases that gives corona wedgies and steals it's lunch money. 

3/7/20 12:16 PM
1/1/01
Posts: 62387

The numbers in this thread are high but I believe they are under reported.  It will become obvious soon that we are being lied to

3/7/20 12:37 PM
1/1/01
Posts: 19637

Coronavirus Cases:

105,563 

view by country

Deaths:

3,562

Recovered:

58,625

ACTIVE CASES 

43,376

Currently Infected Patients

37,144 (86%) 

in Mild Condition


6,232 (14%) 

Serious or Critical


Show Graph

Jan 22Jan 26Jan 30Feb 03Feb 07Feb 11Feb 15Feb 19Feb 23Feb 27Mar 02Mar 06050k100k

Show Statistics

3/7/20 6:00 PM
4/19/09
Posts: 32964
Wayne Glamcock -
ziggystardust -
Trust -

Iran added 1200 cases in one day.  From 3500 to 4700 cases . . . in one day. 

They seem to be doing nothing to mitigate its spread. 

It's the difference between an organized and a disorganized authoritarian regime...

China closed off entire cities with military. In Iran it's traffic chaos because everyone is heading to the Caspian Sea for vacation, because schools and universities are closed.

which makes me wonder how India doesn't become covid19 super nova

I am chatting with Indians daily and they have been laughing about corona virus. There is a lot of chatter that the bug does not lole tropical humid environments..

3/7/20 6:03 PM
8/31/10
Posts: 36648

These numbers don't mean shit. I want The Donald's daily hunch updates!

 

3/7/20 6:57 PM
11/20/09
Posts: 42728

I have the coronavirus. And it hasn't been that bad.

I am in my late 60s, and the sickest I've ever been was when I had bronchitis several years ago. That laid me out on my back for a few days. This has been much easier: no chills, no body aches. I breathe easily, and I don't have a stuffy nose. My chest feels tight, and I have coughing spells. If I were at home with similar symptoms, I probably would have gone to work as usual.


I caught the virus on the Diamond Princess, the cruise ship that was quarantined outside Yokohama for 14 days, at the end of a 16-day cruise I took with my wife, Jeri. When I left the ship a couple of weeks ago, I felt fine. We checked our temperatures throughout our quarantine. Jeri and I got a swab test for the virus. Our temperatures were normal; they'd get the swab results back in 48 hours. Our test results had not arrived before we boarded buses for the airport, where two U.S. government planes waited for us.


As we took off from Tokyo, I had a bit of a cough, but I chalked it up to the dry air in the cabin. I felt pretty tired - but who wouldn't, in our situation? I dozed off.

When I woke up, I had a fever. I made my way to the back of the cargo plane, where the Air Force had set up a quarantine area cordoned off with sheets of plastic. They took my temperature. It was over 103 degrees. So I took a seat in the quarantine area and fell back asleep until we touched down in California, at Travis Air Force Base.


Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came onto the plane and said that three of us who had been cordoned off would fly to Omaha (with our spouses, if they wanted to come along). The CDC had a quarantine location at the University of Nebraska's hospital. We arrived on Feb. 17, greeted by a fleet of ambulances and police cars. Officials put me on a stretcher and wheeled me into a van, which made for a very dramatic scene. I easily could have walked despite my exhaustion.

On the hospital campus, they put me in a biocontainment unit. The space was sealed off, with two double-paned windows that looked out on the hallway, and a large, heavy, insulated door. Two cameras watched me at all times; a set of computer monitors were equipped with microphones, so that the medical staff and I could communicate with CDC officials at central command down the hall. The room had last been used for the Ebola outbreak in 2013.

A doctor and nurses reviewed my case with me and took a bunch of lab tests. They wore heavy-duty hazmat suits sealed with duct tape and equipped with motors that helped with air circulation. It looked like something out of "The Andromeda Strain." When the test came back a few hours later, I wasn't surprised to learn that I had the coronavirus. Later, the Tokyo swab confirmed the result - I had caught the virus even before I left the ship.

It didn't scare me too badly. I knew my number was up. The way I saw it, I was going to get stuck in at least 14 more days of quarantine, even if I didn't get the virus. So many fellow passengers had come down with the illness, including one of my friends, that I'd gotten somewhat used to the idea that I might catch it, too. My wife, however, tested negative and headed to quarantine at a separate facility a few blocks away. After those days being cooped up on the ship together, I think we both relished the alone time; we still could communicate through our phones.ime.

Edited: 3/8/20 6:20 AM
11/20/09
Posts: 42729


As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.
It's surreal to see everyone panic
If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.

 

https://m.stamfordadvocate.com/opinion/article/I-have-the-coronavirus-So-far-it-isn-t-that-bad-15093664.php?fbclid=IwAR3iImhg966WTCuWpFq_hSEs7QVV5Q4ligBOgfOIFrSIdoLvCcfWUQQF5FU

3/7/20 7:05 PM
7/6/14
Posts: 3982
D241 -

I have the coronavirus. And it hasn't been that bad.

I am in my late 60s, and the sickest I've ever been was when I had bronchitis several years ago. That laid me out on my back for a few days. This has been much easier: no chills, no body aches. I breathe easily, and I don't have a stuffy nose. My chest feels tight, and I have coughing spells. If I were at home with similar symptoms, I probably would have gone to work as usual.


I caught the virus on the Diamond Princess, the cruise ship that was quarantined outside Yokohama for 14 days, at the end of a 16-day cruise I took with my wife, Jeri. When I left the ship a couple of weeks ago, I felt fine. We checked our temperatures throughout our quarantine. Jeri and I got a swab test for the virus. Our temperatures were normal; they'd get the swab results back in 48 hours. Our test results had not arrived before we boarded buses for the airport, where two U.S. government planes waited for us.


As we took off from Tokyo, I had a bit of a cough, but I chalked it up to the dry air in the cabin. I felt pretty tired - but who wouldn't, in our situation? I dozed off.

When I woke up, I had a fever. I made my way to the back of the cargo plane, where the Air Force had set up a quarantine area cordoned off with sheets of plastic. They took my temperature. It was over 103 degrees. So I took a seat in the quarantine area and fell back asleep until we touched down in California, at Travis Air Force Base.


Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came onto the plane and said that three of us who had been cordoned off would fly to Omaha (with our spouses, if they wanted to come along). The CDC had a quarantine location at the University of Nebraska's hospital. We arrived on Feb. 17, greeted by a fleet of ambulances and police cars. Officials put me on a stretcher and wheeled me into a van, which made for a very dramatic scene. I easily could have walked despite my exhaustion.

On the hospital campus, they put me in a biocontainment unit. The space was sealed off, with two double-paned windows that looked out on the hallway, and a large, heavy, insulated door. Two cameras watched me at all times; a set of computer monitors were equipped with microphones, so that the medical staff and I could communicate with CDC officials at central command down the hall. The room had last been used for the Ebola outbreak in 2013.

A doctor and nurses reviewed my case with me and took a bunch of lab tests. They wore heavy-duty hazmat suits sealed with duct tape and equipped with motors that helped with air circulation. It looked like something out of "The Andromeda Strain." When the test came back a few hours later, I wasn't surprised to learn that I had the coronavirus. Later, the Tokyo swab confirmed the result - I had caught the virus even before I left the ship.

It didn't scare me too badly. I knew my number was up. The way I saw it, I was going to get stuck in at least 14 more days of quarantine, even if I didn't get the virus. So many fellow passengers had come down with the illness, including one of my friends, that I'd gotten somewhat used to the idea that I might catch it, too. My wife, however, tested negative and headed to quarantine at a separate facility a few blocks away. After those days being cooped up on the ship together, I think we both relished the alone time; we still could communicate through our phones.ime.

Cool... 

3/7/20 7:06 PM
2/27/03
Posts: 1273
“As I draw my last feeble breaths, I say to my family, my friends, and my son in faraway London: All my life, I was a filial son, a responsible father, a loving husband, and an honest person! Farewell to those I love and to those who loved me!”


A Chinese film director and his parents and sister have all reportedly died from coronavirus after quarantining themselves at home in the city at the centre of the outbreak.

Chang Kai, 55, reportedly described in a final message on social media how he had struggled to secure hospital beds for his family in Wuhan after they fell ill.

His father died on 28 January, three days after reporting symptoms of Covid-19, followed by his mother on 2 February.

“My father had a fever, cough and trouble breathing,” Mr Chang wrote. “I tried to send him to the hospital but none of the hospitals we visited took him, because they had no more beds.”

His older sister died of the illness a few hours after Mr Chang, a director with Hubei FIlm Studio. His wife remains in critical condition, according to the Chinese news site Caixin.

The deaths prompted criticism of the government’s initial advice that patients should self-isolate at home rather than overburden the city’s hospitals. Authorities eventually changed the policy on 2 February after building two new 1,000-bed hospitals in just 10 days.

Officials have also been accused of trying to cover up or downplay the outbreak by reprimanding doctors who tried to warn the public.

Coronavirus far deadlier than normal flu, new figures show Wuhan and several other cities in Hubei province have been under lockdown since the Lunar New Year holiday last month. Nearly all movement has been restricted apart from quarantine efforts, medical care and delivery of food and basic necessities.

3/7/20 7:32 PM
1/19/12
Posts: 31681
robbie380 -
ABCTT_GROUNDnLB -

Active cases taking out China have skyrocketed over the past week.  Even if you take out Iran and China they have still doubled. 

“Skyrocketed”’is hyperbole.

 

The fact is every new region affected experiences the same curve. Geometric growth, plateau and the recession. The global trend is a layering on of each of those regions.

 

It’s completely expected the new regions affected will experience the stage of geometric growth. 
 

The great news is that all the history shows that the active case recession follows not to long after.

3/7/20 8:20 PM
1/7/09
Posts: 15677
D241 -

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.

Cool story bro.  No one cares about the 80% who dont get seriously ill.  They're not the concern.

 

Why dont you post a story from the perspective of one of the people on mechanical ventilation for 6 weeks? Or the story of someone whose loved one died?

3/7/20 9:29 PM
11/20/09
Posts: 42730
turducken - 
D241 -

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.

Cool story bro.  No one cares about the 80% who dont get seriously ill.  They're not the concern.

 

Why dont you post a story from the perspective of one of the people on mechanical ventilation for 6 weeks? Or the story of someone whose loved one died?


3/7/20 9:35 PM
3/9/13
Posts: 4247
ABCTT_GROUNDnLB -
robbie380 -
ABCTT_GROUNDnLB -

Active cases taking out China have skyrocketed over the past week.  Even if you take out Iran and China they have still doubled. 

“Skyrocketed”’is hyperbole.

 

The fact is every new region affected experiences the same curve. Geometric growth, plateau and the recession. The global trend is a layering on of each of those regions.

 

It’s completely expected the new regions affected will experience the stage of geometric growth. 
 

The great news is that all the history shows that the active case recession follows not to long after.

The question is if the recession comes if you just ignore it like the U.S. has been doing so far.

3/7/20 10:15 PM
2/27/03
Posts: 1274
https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20200308_07/

Doctors at a hospital in Yamanashi Prefecture west of Tokyo, say the new coronavirus is likely to have caused meningitis in a male patient in his 20s.

The man had a fever on February 27 and visited different medical institutions on February 28 and March 2, but was not tested for the coronavirus.

The man was found collapsed in his home on Friday and was transported to hospital where he tested positive for the coronavirus.

He is now in intensive care with a fever, pneumonia and meningitis.

Doctors at the hospital say it is extremely rare for the new coronavirus to trigger meningitis.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20200308/k10012319561000.html

English translation of the Japanese original article:

Yamanashi Pref. announces the confirmation of a 20s male office worker lives in the prefecture. He is now hospitalized in the hospital in the prefecture, but his condition is reported to be serious one.

Govenor Nagasaki of Yamanashi Pref. announced in the press conference last evening [on Mar. 07] that the new confirmed is a 20s male office worker who had lived and mainly active in Minami Arupusu City as well as Showa Town.

The confirmed got fever of 38.5 Celsius degree first on Feb. 27, so he went to hospitals twice on Feb. 28 (the 1st hospital) and on Mar. 02 (another hospital) respectively, but neither of the hospitals had conducted PCR test for Sars-Cov-2 on him.

He had been away from work since. Feb. 29, and his collaegues were worry about his symptom since they lost contact with him. So, they called for the police. On Mar. 06, both his family members and policemen took a visit in his home, and found him unconscious in his room.

He was moved by emergency to University of Yamanashi Hospital. He has taken 3 PCR tests then, and 2 of them by the hospital turned out to be positive.

His condition is serious with consciousness disorder, so gets treated now in ICU.

We know little about the possible source of his infection, but he has neither a travel history to abrord nor chronic symptoms. d The Governor comments that they couldn't talk to him about his doings due to his symptoms, so that his sphere of living activity (Minami Arupusu City & Showa Town) is provisory statement, and emphasizes that anyone with health problem in these area should consult with the public health center.

Meningitis caused by Sars-Cov-2?

Concerning the symptoms of this new confirmed (20s male), it is highly likely that his meningitis is caused by the novel corona virus, the hospital comments.

This information was disclosed by Dean Shinji SHIMADA in the press conference held in the hospital, together with his other symptoms like fever, pneumonia, and consciousness disorder.

They found a positive reaction to the virus also in cerebrospinal fluid of the patient. The dean commented about this finding as following: 'It is highly likely that Sars-Cov-2 causes the meningitis of the confirmed. This is very rare as well as important case'.
3/7/20 10:16 PM
1/7/09
Posts: 15679
D241 -
turducken - 
D241 -

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.

Cool story bro.  No one cares about the 80% who dont get seriously ill.  They're not the concern.

 

Why dont you post a story from the perspective of one of the people on mechanical ventilation for 6 weeks? Or the story of someone whose loved one died?


Elon is smart, I hope he is right.  This is out of his area of expertise though. Can you find a respected virologist or epidemiologist who is not concerned about it?  I have yet to hear a single one say it's anything other than extremely serious.