OtherGround Forums Wuhan Coronavirus daily update counts: 10,192,727

3/7/20 10:45 PM
1/7/09
Posts: 15680

 

Dr. Richard Hatchett: "This is the most frightening disease I've ever encountered in my career and that includes Ebola. It's frightening because of the combination of infectiousness & a lethality that appears to be many-fold higher than flu.”

 

Richard J. Hatchett, MD, is Chief Executive Officer of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), a partnership of public, private, philanthropic and civil organizations that will finance and co-ordinate the development of vaccines against high priority public health threats and vaccine platform technologies to respond rapidly to emerging infectious diseases with pandemic or epidemic potential.

 

Prior to joining CEPI, Dr. Hatchett most recently served as acting Director of the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), after serving for five years as BARDA’s Chief Medical Officer and Deputy Director. At BARDA, Dr. Hatchett oversaw programs to develop medical countermeasures against chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats, pandemic influenza, and emerging infectious diseases and led or helped lead the development of vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for a number of emerging viruses, including the H3N2v and H7N9 influenza viruses, MERS, Ebola, and Zika.

 

Previously, Dr. Hatchett served on the White House Homeland Security Council under President George W. Bush and was a member of the White House National Security Staff under President Barack Obama. He is a recipient of the HHS Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service and a five-time recipient of the NIH Director’s Merit Award. A graduate of Vanderbilt University and the Vanderbilt University Medical School, he completed a residency in internal medicine at the New York Hospital – Cornell Medical Centre and a fellowship in medical oncology at Duke University Medical Centre.

3/7/20 10:49 PM
1/1/01
Posts: 24214
Not so good news out of italy.
Edited: 3/7/20 11:12 PM
2/27/03
Posts: 1275

From Reddit - Articles from the Spanish Flu Era




3/8/20 1:58 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 48903
D241 - 

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.


If you are really being serious then I had already read about your case.  Glad you are ok and recovering if so.  However as others have said it's the 20% that end up in ICU that is concerning.  It can quicly overrun our hospital system.

But if you are really who you say you are, why did you wait so long to reveal it?   Unless I have you mixed up with someone else you were posting a few days ago about the virus and never mentioned any of this.  

3/8/20 3:06 AM
1/20/08
Posts: 19539
Soup and Beer -
D241 - 

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.


If you are really being serious then I had already read about your case.  Glad you are ok and recovering if so.  However as others have said it's the 20% that end up in ICU that is concerning.  It can quicly overrun our hospital system.

But if you are really who you say you are, why did you wait so long to reveal it?   Unless I have you mixed up with someone else you were posting a few days ago about the virus and never mentioned any of this.  

Pretty sure this was just a copy/paste to share that guys experience. 

3/8/20 3:09 AM
9/13/19
Posts: 1920
Seems to me that the world is doing what it takes, testing, scanning, secluding those with viris. This shit was WAY overblown lol.
Edited: 3/8/20 3:20 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 48904
PwnedCakes - Seems to me that the world is doing what it takes, testing, scanning, secluding those with viris. This shit was WAY overblown lol.

 

Yes but to properly hope to contain it you have to practically shut down the entire country's economy.  China is turning a corner I think along with South Korea.  But if things don't get back up and running in China soon it could be bad.

 

3/8/20 3:18 AM
1/20/08
Posts: 19540
PwnedCakes - Seems to me that the world is doing what it takes, testing, scanning, secluding those with viris. This shit was WAY overblown lol.

Right? That's why Italy was like 'Fuck the old people, we're not even going to try and save them any more. Now we can focus on the younger ones that might survive. 

3/8/20 3:22 AM
8/31/10
Posts: 36662

I have a hunch, that if there are no zombies, there is no reason to battle in the toilet paper aisle. 

3/8/20 5:47 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 4799
DougWilson - Not so good news out of italy.

Italy set to quarantine whole of Lombardy due to coronavirus

Government’s draft decree would impose fines on anyone caught entering or leaving northern region.

The Italian government is to lockdown the northern region of Lombardy, as it battles to contain the spread of the coronavirus. A draft decree would extend the quarantined areas, so-called “red-zones”, ordering people not to enter or leave the region.

The country is grappling to contain Europe’s worst outbreak of Covid-19, which has claimed 233 lives and infected a total of 5,883 people.

Italian authorities announced that a new decree containing draconian measures would be approved later on Saturday. It will include the power to impose fines on anyone caught entering or leaving Lombardy, the worst-affected region, until 3 April. People may be allowed in and out for serious reasons. The decree provides for banning all public events, closing cinemas, theatres, gyms, discos and pubs. Religious ceremonies such as funerals and weddings will also be banned.

Rome is also considering prolonging the closure of schools across the country until 3 April, while major sporting events, such as Serie A football games, will be played behind closed doors.

The number of coronavirus cases in Italy leapt by more than 1,200 in a 24-hour period, the civil protection agency said on Saturday. It is the biggest daily rise since the outbreak began two weeks ago.

Coronavirus: nine reasons to be reassured
Read more
The number of cases in the country rose to 5,883 on Saturday from 4,636 announced on Friday, with the spread showing little sign of slowing. In total there are now 5,061 cases, not including those who have died or recovered.

The northern regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna and Veneto are the hardest hit, representing 85% of cases and 92% of recorded deaths.

“We will win this battle if our citizens adopt a responsible attitude and change their way of living,” the head of Italy’s civil protection agency, Angelo Borrelli, told a press conference.

The outbreak is severely damaging the Italian economy, with warnings that the tourism sector alone could experience €7.4bn (£6.4bn) of losses during this trimester.


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/07/italy-set-to
3/8/20 6:19 AM
11/20/09
Posts: 42732
ABCTT_SENNIN - 
Soup and Beer -
D241 - 

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.


If you are really being serious then I had already read about your case.  Glad you are ok and recovering if so.  However as others have said it's the 20% that end up in ICU that is concerning.  It can quicly overrun our hospital system.

But if you are really who you say you are, why did you wait so long to reveal it?   Unless I have you mixed up with someone else you were posting a few days ago about the virus and never mentioned any of this.  

Pretty sure this was just a copy/paste to share that guys experience. 


correct.  Sorry for the confusion I will edit my post.

3/8/20 6:19 AM
8/29/09
Posts: 16873
turducken -
D241 -
turducken - 
D241 -

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.

Cool story bro.  No one cares about the 80% who dont get seriously ill.  They're not the concern.

 

Why dont you post a story from the perspective of one of the people on mechanical ventilation for 6 weeks? Or the story of someone whose loved one died?


Elon is smart, I hope he is right.  This is out of his area of expertise though. Can you find a respected virologist or epidemiologist who is not concerned about it?  I have yet to hear a single one say it's anything other than extremely serious.

Elon is smart, but the coronavirus is buttfucking the launch of Chinese made Teslas. 
 

He really wants this shit to get back to normal, as it's potentially costing him billions in sales. 

3/8/20 7:16 AM
4/19/09
Posts: 32966

Q6 million quarantined in Milan area. Reports from my buddy working in Bankijng in Milan are that the cleaning staff and lower vlass people had word that quarantine was coming so thousands have already headed south to their origin points.

Edited: 3/8/20 7:27 AM
1/12/07
Posts: 16742
SpunQ -

I think rogue states will be fear mongered the worst.

 

Iran

Italy

Germany

New Zealand

Australia

 

Why ???

 

Soros .

 

 

Iran generals and vice presidents = dead / infected.

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2020/02/27/Iranian-Vice-President-Masoumeh-Ebtekar-tests-positive-for-coronavirus-Report.html

 

Vatican related Saudis = dead

 

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2020/02/28/Iran-s-former-envoy-to-Vatican-Hadi-Khosroshahi-dies-of-coronavirus.html

 

New Zealand / far right crackdown.

 

 

 

3/8/20 8:33 AM
1/19/12
Posts: 31683
SpunQ -
SpunQ -

I think rogue states will be fear mongered the worst.

 

Iran

Italy

Germany

New Zealand

Australia

 

Why ???

 

Soros .

 

 

Iran generals and vice presidents = dead / infected.

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2020/02/27/Iranian-Vice-President-Masoumeh-Ebtekar-tests-positive-for-coronavirus-Report.html

 

Vatican related Saudis = dead

 

https://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2020/02/28/Iran-s-former-envoy-to-Vatican-Hadi-Khosroshahi-dies-of-coronavirus.html

 

New Zealand / far right crackdown.

 

 

 

I’m not against this

3/8/20 8:34 AM
1/19/12
Posts: 31684
KeijiKadekawa -

From Reddit - Articles from the Spanish Flu Era




Cool articles. Thanks for posting 

3/8/20 10:35 AM
8/2/19
Posts: 951
PwnedCakes - Seems to me that the world is doing what it takes, testing, scanning, secluding those with viris. This shit was WAY overblown lol.

How could it be way overblown if after doing everything you just mentioned the virus still spread all over the world infected 100k+ and caused thousands of deaths.  

Edited: 3/8/20 10:44 AM
1/1/01
Posts: 19643

Coronavirus Cases:

107,802 

view by country

Deaths:

3,661

Recovered:

60,924

ACTIVE CASES 

43,217

Currently Infected Patients

37,176 (86%) 

in Mild Condition


6,041 (14%) 

Serious or Critial

3/8/20 11:28 AM
10/25/05
Posts: 10333

Germany, almost 1000 cases, no deaths. We need to do whatever they do when it comes to health care. 

3/8/20 11:29 AM
1/12/07
Posts: 16754
Cire -

Coronavirus Cases:

107,802 

view by country

Deaths:

3,661

Recovered:

60,924

ACTIVE CASES 

43,217

Currently Infected Patients

37,176 (86%) 

in Mild Condition


6,041 (14%) 

Serious or Critial

Its moving so slowly.

3/8/20 1:29 PM
4/27/14
Posts: 23309

Would be nice if it works out: https://www.fox46charlotte.com/news/university-of-tennessee-scientists-may-have-found-coronavirus-cure

3/8/20 1:30 PM
4/27/14
Posts: 23310
D241 - 
ABCTT_SENNIN - 
Soup and Beer -
D241 - 

During the first few days, the hospital staff hooked me up to an IV, mostly as a precaution, and used it to administer magnesium and potassium, just to make sure I had plenty of vitamins. Other than that, my treatment has consisted of what felt like gallons and gallons of Gatorade - and, when my fever rose just above 100 degrees, some ibuprofen. The nurses came to the room every four hours or so, to check my vitals, ask if I needed anything and to draw my blood. I got very good at unhooking all the monitors checking my oxygen level, blood pressure and heart rate so I could go to the bathroom or just pace around the room a little, to get my blood flowing. I never quite got the hang of hooking them back up without making a tangled mess. After 10 days, I moved out of biocontainment and into the same facility as Jeri. Now we can videochat from our separate quarantines, in neighboring rooms.

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don't require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I've agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would've expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It's surreal to see everyone panic - news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures - about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won't help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I'd recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn't have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn't be back until March - that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I'd catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic - that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it's happening, I'm just taking it one day at a time.


If you are really being serious then I had already read about your case.  Glad you are ok and recovering if so.  However as others have said it's the 20% that end up in ICU that is concerning.  It can quicly overrun our hospital system.

But if you are really who you say you are, why did you wait so long to reveal it?   Unless I have you mixed up with someone else you were posting a few days ago about the virus and never mentioned any of this.  

Pretty sure this was just a copy/paste to share that guys experience. 


correct.  Sorry for the confusion I will edit my post.


Yeah, that's from an article from the New York Times by a coronavirus patient that I originally posted.

3/8/20 1:44 PM
1/20/08
Posts: 19541

Not so slowly now.

3/8/20 1:51 PM
1/7/09
Posts: 15689
ABCTT_SENNIN -

Not so slowly now.

The risk is low. Basically just the common flu

3/8/20 1:54 PM
3/9/13
Posts: 4253
turducken -
ABCTT_SENNIN -

Not so slowly now.

The risk is low. Basically just the common flu

How many weeks until the Pacific Northwest looks like Northern Italy?

 

Two?