UnderGround Forums Kakutogi Road: The Complete History of MMA Vol 1

30 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 936

1991 Shoot-Wrestling Year in Review Continued...

MB: We have witnessed three different promotions all with the same roots, and presumably the same endgames, but with different approaches that have had their pros and cons. The PWFG has been closest to the heart of real shooting, with several performers that have both the talent and desire to push this format closer to their vision of “real” fighting, with the drawback being that they have at times sacrificed entertainment value for realism.

 The UWFI on the other hand has been the most consistently entertaining of the three promotions by a wide margin, but also the most frustrating, as their insistence on making Nobuhiko Takada appear to be indestructible as well as some of their other booking decisions have shown that they may be the promotion with the most to lose in the next year, as they run the risk of being a flash-in-the-pan with their inability to provide Takada with some real threats to his throne.

RINGS has by far had the rockiest start, as Maeda simply had to run this promotion mainly on the sheer strength of his star-power alone, as he is severely lacking any homegrown talent, and his outsourcing almost all of his talent to martial artists with little to no experience in pro wrestling has led to some very uneven results. The upside to this, is that Maeda seems to have the strongest concept in place, and now that Volk Han has arrived, the only direction to go now is up. Another credit to Maeda, is that he is willing to allow himself to lose if it means good business, and honestly he comes across to me as if he wouldn’t mind not wrestling at all, but is forcing himself to do it as it’s the only way to sell tickets and be able to have a television deal in place at this stage in time.

A few of the historical highlights that were witnessed in 1991 include:

The first full-blown MMA fight in the shoot- era (not counting Shooto) with Takaku Fuke vs Lawi Napataya. (At the 7-26-91 PWFG event)

A shoot fight between Gerard Gordeau and Mitsuya Nagai which took place almost two years before Gordeau was at the inaugural UFC event.

A shoot between Ken Shamrock and Kazuo Takahashi, that was short, fast, and brutal. Very entertaining, but perhaps a cautionary tale as Shamrock almost kicked Kazuo’s head off his body and was probably a warning against these kinds of matches from being trusted to happen in the near future.

Shoots between pro wrestlers and legitimate high-skilled boxers. Even though the concept far exceeded the execution, we got to see Billy Scott face a very deadly James Warring in an MMA fight, and while the rules led to a ridiculous outcome, this was a historical snap-shot of protoplasmic MMA.

The birth of Kiyoshi Tamura. He had a brief run the NEWBORN UWF but was quickly sidelined by an injury given to him by Akira Maeda. The UWFI has wisely chosen to showcase his talent, but perhaps unwisely not given him as strong as a push as they should have, due to their choosing to groom Garly Albright as the unstoppable suplex machine that will eventually come to blows with Takada. This is unfortunate as we can see that he is a once in a lifetime performer that not only has endless potential in this of pro wrestling, but surely has the goods to be effective in real shoots as well. (Though we have not seen him in a real shoot as of yet.)

The debut of Volk Han. Another talent that only comes around once in a generation, this Sambo master would wind up showcasing what was a relatively unknown martial art to the world at large, and gave us a glimpse of new possibilities both in the shoot and shoot->

A format that really allowed talents like Minoru Suzuki, Masakatsu Funaki, and Ken Shamrock to flourish and cultivate their skills/identities. Without the PWFG Ken Shamrock would have probably continued to flounder around in the middle spectrum of American Pro Wrestling, and while there was a chance he could have caught a break in an American promotion with his physique, it probably wouldn’t have come anywhere close to the opportunities afforded to him by being an early star of American MMA. Fuanki and Suzuki on the other hand, probably would have both carved out respectable careers in NJPW or other Japanese pro wrestling companies, but would not have anywhere near the respect or notoriety of having founded the Pancrase organization, and thereby securing their legacies as MMA pioneers.

It remains to be seen what awaits us on the horizon as we venture into 1992, but it is clearly an exciting time as the and hearts of each of these promotions have coalesced enough that they each have their separate, yet equally important, identities that are going to blaze the path forward to becoming part of the roots of full blown MMA.

 

Edited: 30 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 937

1991 Shoot-Wrestling Year in Review Continued...

1991 Shoot-Wrestling Promotions Ranked:

ML:

1. UWF-I. While it's not like me to fall on the entertainment side, UWF-I not only had the standout performer in Kiyoshi Tamura, who single-handedly had half the years best matches, but also just had so much more roster depth than the other promotions. Yamazaki & Ohe were always threats to have a good match. Miyato ultimately may have had the best year of his career working with Tamura after looking out of date at the outset. Anjo probably had his best year thusfar as well. Kakihara, Kanehara, & Scott were very exciting, and were only held back a lot more by lack of appearances than lack of experience. I don't like that the promotion is built around Takada, and now Albright, but even though these two only managed a single good match between them, UWF-I was definitely the most likely promotion to have multiple good matches per show.

2. PWFG. As much as I'd like to rank PWFG #1, there's only so much you can do when you basically have 3 workers, two of whom you for some reason refuse to allow to fight one another. Suzuki & Shamrock delivered when they had opponents, and Funaki was the most successful at showing what actual MMA looks like, but once you take Sano out of the equation there's just not a whole lot else going on here. While I think there's a decent chance Fuke could be that 4th guy they truly need, they are unwilling to give him that opportunity, and thus risk this promotion starting to get stale as they have the fewest guys coming up the ranks.

3. RINGS. While RINGS is a distant 3rd in what would be the worst year in the history of the promotion, managing to awkwardly cobble together 4 big shows featuring a broken Maeda & whatever martial artists he could unearth that wanted a paycheck, they have a lot of leeway going forward given they don't really have a set roster yet. RINGS was definitely figuring things out as they went along, and began to find their bearings at the end of the year with the introduction of Han & the Seidokaikan fighters. Given almost all their fighters other than Maeda would qualify as a rookie under one definition or another, they arguably have the most promise going forward as Han, Willie Peeters, Herman Renting, Mitsuya Nagai, Bert Kops Jr., Koichiro Kimura, and others should be better, if not much better at this time next year. They also have the best chance at making the kickboxing aspect work given they have multiple options and less of a stake in the outcome working with karate league rather than just having 1 fighter under contract and trying to find compelling opponents for him that aren't too easy but also don't make him look bad given it's very much to their detriment when Ohe loses.

MB:

  1. UWF-I. Although it pains me to admit it as well (I was really hoping to put PWFG in this place) I must agree with ML on this. While the UWFI does seem to be on the most fragile of foundations as the promotion seems to insist on building everything around Takada, there is no question that they have the deepest talent roster of these three promotions, as well as the highest percentage of good matches. Their biggest problem right now is their average event length. With most of their shows only clocking in at the 1-hour mark (when you take away the montages/intros/etc) then Takada’s shenanigans become much more of a nuisance then if they had added another 1-1/2 hours to their format. Instead they have been tending to rely on tag-team matches to try and cram most of their roster into such a tight time crunch. They have also criminally underused one of their most valuable players in Kazuo Yamazaki, and there doesn’t seem to be any indication that will be changing anytime soon. All said, this feels like the promotion with the most to lose in in the days to come, and it will really depend on how well they can build Albright as a foil to Takada, or if they can come up with any other narratives that don’t involve him.
  2. PWFG. I would say that the highest highs of 1991 have been within this promotion, but they weren’t hit with enough frequency to knock the UWFI out of the top spot. They are the closest to what would become actual MMA, but what is hindering them is a serious lack of depth in their roster, especially towards the beginning of the year. Once you got past Funaki/Suzuki/Shamrock, it started to feel like you were fielding applications from the Acme Institute of Unemployed Jobbers. Things started tightening up by the end of the year as Fuke is really starting to become a key player and Duane Koslowski adds a lot of gravitas for the mid-card, but Fujiwara and Vale are problems as they can only be used in specific situations without dragging the card down, and guys like Wellington Wilkins Jr, are just going to amount to filler any way you cut it. For the long-term health of this promotion they are going to have to find 1-2 more key full-time players, and Fujiwara would have to be willing to phase himself out of an active competitor role, which is something that he may be unwilling to do, and perhaps unable to do, depending on how much his name is needed to sell tickets at this point. It would seem like he is in the best position of the three promotions to get away with a secondary or behind the scenes role, as Funaki, and the rest of the promotion seem to be over with the fans, and he never had the star power of a Maeda to begin with. Fujiwara has the raw talent on board to make his promotion take the top spot next year, but will arguably have the hardest time making that happen, as even one mistake and it could very well be fatal for this outfit.
  3. FIGHTING NETWORK RINGS. Of the three promotions that we have covered this year, RINGS is perhaps the most interesting in the sense that they undeniably had the worst year in terms of the actual content that they put forth, but also clearly have the most long-term potential of the three leagues. Despite the uneven quality there is no question that Maeda has set up a format that is going to provide a lot of elasticity and room for growth. By creating something of a quasi-federation where various countries have their representatives competing at any given time, this could theoretically foster an environment where individual star power will not be as important as your standard pro-wrestling promotion, as one could be pulled more into rooting for a particular country or faction, almost akin to a team-sport dynamic. That’s not to say that they don’t need to build more stars, they do, but with Maeda being able to single handedly sell giant swaths of tickets on his own name, and with the recent arrival of Volk Han, and help from the Sediokaikan guy, it only seems like a matter of time before things will fall into place for Maeda and Co. At the very least it appears that RINGS is in the best position to find themselves in the days to come, whereas the PWFG and UWFI are much more susceptible of being disrupted in the days to come.  
30 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 938

Top-Ten Shoot Wrestlers of 1991

ML:

1. Kiyoshi Tamura. Though Suzuki at least gave Tamura a little competition putting up three **** or better matches, and really being the only other fighter to make their presence felt in the top 10 matches list, this is still Tamura by a landslide. He really transformed the sport with his full speed chain grappling >

 

Tamura set the bar for pro wrestling grappling about 10 times higher with his explosive that really brought scrambling and chaining attacks into the pro wrestling game. He made the matches much less predictable by introducing complex, fast paced sequences that continued far beyond the single action/reaction based that was previously in place, greatly increasing both the intensity and the level of difficulty by extending both the length and the scope. Now it wasn't simply the first attack that you had to defend, but rather each attack was as much an attempt to succeed with the takedown or submission or control gain as it was a diversion to get the opponent off guard for the subsequent attempt, if the previous one didn't work. Though none of the other performers were near Tamura's level, he was able to bring them into his new universe and raise their game to levels they didn't attain with anyone else. Basically, everyone who worked with Tamura also had their best match with him, which is the mark of a truly next level performer. In this case, it's partially because the opponents were forced to work so much harder & faster to try to simply keep up with Tamura and prevent him from out them to the point of embarrassment that the best they had emerged. Certainly, a great deal of skill, precision, speed, and body control is also required from the opponent to pull off the Tamura wanted to work without a hitch, and they too deserve a lot of credit, as the Kazuchika Okada's of the world would have just laid on the mat looking clueless and letting Tamura just do whatever he could to their corpse rather than engaging Tamura in his interactive, back & forth jockeying.

 

2. Minoru Suzuki. Suzuki did the best job of transitioning from the pro wrestling to the shoot just having a better grasp of what made both tick from a viewer standpoint. He combined the urgency and intensity necessary to make the matches work as "shoots" with the more subtle brand of entertainment of pro wrestling where actions and affectations that aren't necessary but also aren't unreasonable are thrown in for dramatic purposes, finding an exciting balance between the credible and the energetic. Even when he was doing somewhat nonsensical things such as trying to work in his dropkick, his matches still overall felt like epic struggles where you couldn't let your guard down for a second. As we are seeing with Tamura, being fast and explosive are far more important to the quality of worked shoot than absolute technical precision because ultimately you are still getting away with something, it's just that the less time you give the audience to identify that, the more difficult it becomes for them to see the holes. Suzuki had excellent speed and footwork in standup even though that wasn't the strength of his game, and was the only fighter who won two shoots, a planned one where he relied on his grappling to beat Thai fighter Lawi Napataya and an unplanned one where he relied on his footwork and handspeed to humiliate SWS' Apollo Sugawara.

 

3. Yoji Anjo. Coming into the year, my guess would have been that Anjo was #3... in the UWF-I. He really overachieved this year, and even though working with Tamura while Yamazaki didn't made a huge difference, both in the UWF-I rankings, and overall, Anjo deserves a lot of credit for being a diverse & reliable performer who did a reasonably good job in all of his matches.

 

My recollection of the original U.W.F. is that Anjo tended to blend in with the other solid undercarders, separating himself, if at all, by his ability to sustain his level for longer durations. In 1991, there's definitely a distinctive difference between Anjo and the likes of Miyato and Nakano, as Anjo can both add a lot to a match where he's the follower as well as actually carry a match. Anjo may not be great, but he's really reliable. He can do any at any length, and while he doesn't always succeed, his matches don't feel formulaic and, at worst, have some interesting aspects. As the top dick in the promotion, he's able to pull the otherwise largely missing grudge aspects out of his opponents, these shenanigans again differentiating his matches from the rest.

 

30 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 939

Top-Ten Shoot Wrestlers of 1991 Continued...

4. Naoki Sano. It's still unfortunate that Sano had little activity in this during the second half of the year, but he slightly edges out Shamrock now that his two good SWS matches against Funaki can be included.

 

Sano was a great, albeit overly reckless pro wrestler who was willing to go the extra mile. He had a learning curve, and clearly had a lot more potential in this than he was able to reach this year due to spending most of it in his home promotion, SWS, taking on Americans that were neither juniors in nor in weight, finally claiming the inaugural SWS Light Heavyweight Title from an overroided Model. On talent alone, Sano was probably the best follower we saw in this in 1991, immediately having a memorable match with Shamrock, a match of the year with Suzuki, and a couple of good, more technical and less competitive matches in SWS with Funaki. Sano went 1-2-1 in his initial important run, but with Megame Super having deemed it too dangerous to have interpromotional matches with PWFG on SWS's shows after the Suzuki/Apollo debacle, Sano wound up only making a few more appearances in a filler role. This was really a shame because he'd clearly improved a lot in the in just a few matches, and I feel like he could not only have reached another level himself, but helped the stars of this promotion get there too.

 

5. (Ken) Wayne Shamrock. Shamrock's intensity and work ethic were his best attributes early on, but despite having some of his best matches at the outset, he clearly improved a lot over the course of the year, particularly in the striking department. Shamrock benefitted from having the best run of opponents, but even when he was carried by Suzuki & Funaki, he added a lot to the matches and always felt like a distinct talent. He really began to hit his stride with the Suzuki rematch, with his improved familiarity and confidence allowing him to work a more decisive, aggressive, and assertive with strikes that were now solid, if not even impressive.

 

6. Volk Han. Han was the most difficult fighter to rate because he's #2 on talent, but it was easy for everyone else on the list to out compile him given most fighters had close to 10 matches, while he merely had 1. I settled somewhere in the middle, above the guys who could carry a match but didn't really come close to living up to their potential as well as the guys who were strong followers who benefited from having good opponents.

 

Han is an amazing one of a kind, once in a generation talent who was immediately head and shoulders above everyone but Kiyoshi Tamura despite having never competed in a worked or full rules shoot. Han really revolutionized the grappling game, popularizing the attacking, chain submission that made people outside of hardcore practioners want to watch ground fighting and, perhaps indirectly, became the basis of the gambling, no risk no reward Japanese MMA ground at a time when American MMA was all about lay & pray. No submission wrestler was ever flashier than Han, yet perhaps because he wasn't trained in the lazy ways of cooperative pro wrestling, he maintained most of the good habits he'd employed in competitive tournament fighting, and was able to build the sparking end game around a really solid, technically sound foundation. Han had amazing reflexes with the speed and anticipation to capitalize on them, moving constantly and correctly, adjusting, tweeking, eventually capitalizing on something that might otherwise be outlandish, and probably would just be too slow and deliberate if a lesser athlete and/or tactician attempted it. Han was never content to be a one man show, but rather someone who forced the opponent to step up their game to try to keep up with him. Han was going to work his hardest, and if you had any semblance of talent, he wasn't going to let you get away with getting anything over on him without earning it, which again added a level of urgency and intensity to his contests.

 

Kazuo Yamazaki7. Kazuo Yamazaki. While 1991 was probably the worst year of Yamazaki's career since at least 1983, he's still one of the only shooters who will always stand on his own feet and craft a match. Though I'm ranking Anjo ahead of him, it's due to the great work Anjo did against Tamura, an opportunity Yamazaki wasn't granted, and it should be noted that Yamazaki was, of course, the one laying out the good, if somewhat disappointing match he and Anjo had. Yamazaki & Funaki were very similar this year in that they made a conscious choice not to be flashy. As such, I think their actual talent greatly exceeds their end results, but I also respect this decision, and can say that their matches hold up a lot better as quasi shooting because of it. Yamazaki didn't have nearly as many good opportunities as in years past, and while he also didn't make the most of them, he was still a very interesting watch because he's a thoughful performer who has the courage to work outside the expected.

 

8. Yuko Miyato. Miyato is the best follower in the league. Left to his devices, he's basically a one trick pony who just wants to play the underdog and get in 1 or 2 Hail Mary spinning solebutts that won't actually win him the match anyway, but Tamura got him to improve his matwork considerably, upping the number of counters and reversals and just doing things faster to maintain the intensity and viewer interest. As a consequene, Miyato was generally more well rounded this year, and in spending much of his time working with the more capable workers who were also more toward his equals in standing, he seemed better positioned to display a more diverse & technical game. It remains to be seen how consistently he'll employ these sweeps, reversals, and quick position changes when he's not doing them to try to hang with Tamura, but I feel he did progress considerably on the mat from his days of laying around doing nothing in the U.W.F. opening match time fillers against Nakano.

 

30 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 940

Top-Ten Shoot Wrestlers of 1991 Continued...

9. Masakatsu Funaki. Going in, I thought Funaki was a lock for the top 5, but even with the addition of a couple good SWS matches against Sano, I'm not really temped to bump Funaki up because he just never excited me. He's way better than Miyato on paper, but Miyato had a great match and a couple of very good ones, granted all on the sturdy back of Tamura, whereas even Funaki's matches with Sano & Shamrock, who both proved extremely capable of standout matches this year, were only marginal recommendations.

 

Funaki had his own break them down and being positioned at the top of the cards, he was able to carry his opponents through it, or just smother and thwart them. Sparring was important to the PWFG wrestlers dojo preparation, and was definitely influential toward Fujiwara & Masami Soronaka (though he didn't see most of them since he lived in Florida & was only in Japan when the events were close) determining the results of the matches in the sense that while they had to keep the fans happy, everyone knew who was really better, and thus should win. My sense is Funaki either thought the matches should be as realistic as possible or really wanted to win at this point, or both, and mostly continued to implement the positional grappling he dominated with in training, rather than somewhat switching into entertainment mode when the bell rang. Funaki arguably had the most charisma of anyone in the shoot game when he wanted to, but increasingly it was instead his calm & confident demeanor that set him apart. He had the best technical and positional understanding of all these guys, and nothing was going to fluster or sidetrack him because technique trumps emotion. While some of his matwork looked like Takada's on the surface, in other words just laying in wait, Funaki actually had a plan and things going on, and was able to implement this trap setting where he exploited minute advantages and adjusted to stuff the opponent's escapes until he created the opening/forced the mistake, rather than literally doing nothing in hopes that the opponent would eventually bail him out one way or the other as Takada did. Funaki also had tremendous hand speed, but unlike Kakihara, who made a career out of that, was largely reticent to display it in more than brief flashes, being more confident in his ability to dominate on the mat. I respect that Funaki was very much working for everything and out to show that nothing comes easy when the opponent is actually (or at least theoretically) trying to resist, but he was often frustrating because it always felt like, in the best of times, he was good when he should have been great.

 

10. Yusuke Fuke. I'm tempted to rank Hiromitsu Kanehara here because I was so impressed with what little we were able to see of him, but Fuke's best match was better than Kanehara's lone match. Both were really overachievers, Kanehara because it was his debut & his opponent's debut, and Fuke because even though he was one of the few U.W.F. guys that followed Fujiwara to the Gumi, he was the least experienced of the original four, and just got the scraps filling out the undercard.

 

Fuke was one of the only workers to participate in an actual shoot, and was even able to demonstrate ideas that were otherwise almost completely absent from the pro wrestling spectrum such as distance control, getting in and out, and checking kicks in some of his works. In some ways his technique was better than even Funaki's, and one could argue that, despite being an undercarder who only had 3 matches under his belt prior to the U.W.F. split, he did the most this year to advance the sport of pro wrestling toward legitimate martial arts. It's unfortunate that he's positioned with guys that never deliver, Bart Vale & Wellington Wilkins Jr., as he's the only one who seems to have the potential as a worker to to fill the hole left by Sano.

1991 Top-5 Shoot-Wrestling Rookies of the Year.

ML:

1. Volk Han

 

2. Hiromitsu Kanehara

 

3. Willie Peeters

 

4. Billy Scott

 

5. Herman Renting

Top Ten Shoot-Wrestling Matches in 1991

ML: Kiyoshi Tamura vs. Yoji Anjo is UWF-I's best match of 19911. UWF-I 7/3/91: Kiyoshi Tamura vs. Yoji Anjo

 

2. PWFG 7/26/91: Minoru Suzuki vs. Naoki Sano

 

3. UWF-I 8/24/91: Kiyoshi Tamura vs. Yuko Miyato

 

3. UWF-I 6/6/91: Makoto Ohe vs. Rudy Lovato

 

5. PWFG 9/28/91: Wayne Shamrock vs. Minoru Suzuki

 

6. PWFG 3/4/91: Wayne Shamrock vs. Minoru Suzuki

 

7. UWF-I 10/6/91: Kiyoshi Tamura & Yuko Miyato vs. Tatsuo Nakano & Tom Burton

 

8. UWF-I 6/6/91: Kiyoshi Tamura vs. Tom Burton

 

9. UWF-I 11/7/91: Yoji Anjo & Tom Burton vs. Yuko Miyato & Kiyoshi Tamura

 

10. RINGS 12/7/91: Akira Maeda vs. Volk Han

Edited: 29 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 13844

I enjoy reading the comments for UWFI uploads on youtube, there's always a few geniuses, who have worked out that what they're seeing might not be 100% on the level and sagely relay this great secret truth to the world, revelling in their mental superiority like a mere pin head at a convention for the severely mental defective. I always advise them to heed the advice of jimmy 'the mouth of the south" hart, and keep on dancing

 

29 days ago
9/14/13
Posts: 7055
de braco -

I enjoy reading the comments for UWFI uploads on youtube, there's always a few geniuses, who have worked out that what they're seeing might not be 100% on the level and sagely relay this great secret truth to the world, revelling in their mental superiority like a mere pin head at a convention for the severely mental defective. I always advise them to heed the advice of jimmy 'the mouth of the south" hart, and keep on dancing

 

Nearly as bad as the guys on every other pancrase video "joe rogan said this is fake"

Edited: 29 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 13845

Joe has cured his brain with pot smoke to the point where it resembles a fine Virginia ham, in both appearance and function. My favorite has to be the geniuses who don't know the difference between UWF and pancrase. The youtube comments section prove the old adage that the best thing about the Internet is that it gives everyone a voice, and that's also the worst thing about it too. Most morons shouldn't have a voice, as stupidity and self-confidence often go hand in hand, and the fucking stupider they are, the more secure they become in their "knowledge"

29 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14230

preach brother.

29 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 941

Hopefully Eddie Bravo, and Joe Rogan read this thread and wisen up. ;-)

29 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 942

*Coming soon to your screen!*

1992 is now upon us, and the UWFI is set to kick things off with a bang. Not to be undone, Sediokaikan offers up a 1-million Yen ($100,000 Dollar) bounty to the winner of a 57man gloved karate/kickboxing tournament, which ends in shenninanigs and one very confused Akira Maeda. Stay Tuned!

29 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 14234

"As much as I'd like to rank PWFG #1, there's only so much you can do when you basically have 3 workers, two of whom you for some reason refuse to allow to fight one another."

Fujiwara and Soranaka did the matchmaking, and it seems like even Funaki and Suzuki weren't let in on any business decisions. I asked Fujiwara, Funaki, and Suzuki all why they felt there was never a Funaki vs Suzuki match in Fujiwara-Gumi. No one knew why it went that way.


BUT... The January 1992 Fujiwara-Gumi fight program has an interview with Funaki. In it, the interviewer asks about that match up against Suzuki. Funaki responds that he'd want to set it up and have it on the biggest stage they could, on TV.

So was that some legit insight- or a pro wrestling interview? Not sure, and we'll likely never have a definitive answer on why the match with the (arguably) top two guys never materialized.

28 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 943
William C -

"As much as I'd like to rank PWFG #1, there's only so much you can do when you basically have 3 workers, two of whom you for some reason refuse to allow to fight one another."

Fujiwara and Soranaka did the matchmaking, and it seems like even Funaki and Suzuki weren't let in on any business decisions. I asked Fujiwara, Funaki, and Suzuki all why they felt there was never a Funaki vs Suzuki match in Fujiwara-Gumi. No one knew why it went that way.


BUT... The January 1992 Fujiwara-Gumi fight program has an interview with Funaki. In it, the interviewer asks about that match up against Suzuki. Funaki responds that he'd want to set it up and have it on the biggest stage they could, on TV.

So was that some legit insight- or a pro wrestling interview? Not sure, and we'll likely never have a definitive answer on why the match with the (arguably) top two guys never materialized.

Interesting... It's baffling as to why this match never happened in the PWFG era, and to make matters worse, when they finally did face each other in Pancrase at Road to the Championship 4, it was under two mins long, and was possibly the most overtly worked match of that promotion. 

27 days ago
9/14/13
Posts: 7057
mbetz1981 -
William C -

"As much as I'd like to rank PWFG #1, there's only so much you can do when you basically have 3 workers, two of whom you for some reason refuse to allow to fight one another."

Fujiwara and Soranaka did the matchmaking, and it seems like even Funaki and Suzuki weren't let in on any business decisions. I asked Fujiwara, Funaki, and Suzuki all why they felt there was never a Funaki vs Suzuki match in Fujiwara-Gumi. No one knew why it went that way.


BUT... The January 1992 Fujiwara-Gumi fight program has an interview with Funaki. In it, the interviewer asks about that match up against Suzuki. Funaki responds that he'd want to set it up and have it on the biggest stage they could, on TV.

So was that some legit insight- or a pro wrestling interview? Not sure, and we'll likely never have a definitive answer on why the match with the (arguably) top two guys never materialized.

Interesting... It's baffling as to why this match never happened in the PWFG era, and to make matters worse, when they finally did face each other in Pancrase at Road to the Championship 4, it was under two mins long, and was possibly the most overtly worked match of that promotion. 

Yeah, that road to the championship match makes me sad

27 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 944

Here it is for those who haven't seen it. After years of build-up and anticipation.... we get a quick 2-min work. Maybe they didn't want to hurt each other, or maybe it would have just been a dominant squash victory for Funaki, and could have potentialy harmed Suzuki's stock, but either way....this is all that we have. 

Edited: 25 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 948

Kakutogi Road: The Complete History of MMA Vol. 22 "An Intense Defense"

*Editors Note: Mike Lorefice's comments will be preceded by his initials. *

Welcome, as we begin a new era in charting the ever unfolding martial-combat zeitgeist. Yes, 1992 is upon us and we have taken the solemn oath to forge ahead in traversing these uncharted waters, following headlong to wherever they may lead us. 1991 was revelatory in many ways, but ultimately functioned as an hors d'oeuvre of the possibilities of what modern MMA would and could become in the future. It also set the stage for three separate promotions to really start to discover their identity, so we can be sure that this year we will start to see a further development of the myriad of new ideas that were presented when the UWF was birthed in 1984.

We have now arrived to 1-9-92 as we return to the cozy confines of the Korakuen Hall, ready to kick off the year with another UWF-I event. 1991 ended with Takada and Co. making a bold move with their Berbick public relations stunt, that probably would have been a disaster had Berbick actually fought Takada instead of leaving the ring in disgust. Berbick’s actions, though one can’t really fault him for, have had the unfortunate consequences of playing into the narrative that the UWF-I has been trying to craft for the last year, in that Takada is a superhero and an unequalled master in kakutogi combat. We will now have to wait almost 6 years to see this narrative completely collapse when we see the birth and rise of PRIDE FC, but for now let us bathe in the warmth of Takada’s 15mins.

We are welcomed to a montage of some of the various fighters that were present during last months card, giving interviews, before it cuts away to footage of Nobuhiko Takada having a seat right by the front entrance of the Korakuen Hall, greeting fans as they come in, and shaking their hands. This is pretty neat if you think about it, as could you imagine Hulk Hogan hanging around the front of the Center Stage Theater in Atlanta Ga, greeting fans as they entered the studio for a taping of WCW Saturday Night? Neither can I. After a lengthy interview with Takada, of which I understood nothing outside of a reference to his fight with Berbick, we are off to the races, with a rematch between Hiromitsu Kanehara and the other Maeda, Masakazu (not Akira).

These two stole the show a couple of weeks prior when they opened, and while I’m surprised they would go back to the well so quickly, I won’t complain as any day to see Kanehara in action is a good one, indeed. They don’t waste anytime before getting right into the action, and other Maeda is looking a lot more confident this time out, as he immediately goes guns blazing towards Kanehara with a litany of palm-strikes, but is taken down quickly when he misses a Ushiro-Tobi-Mawashi-Geri (reverse jumping roundhouse kick). Maeda was able to quickly get out of Kanehara’s mount and ended the rapid sequence with a soccer kick to Kanehara’s back. We aren’t even a min into the match, and this is looking good, so far.

Maeda continues to press the action with a variety of strikes, that Kanehara is able to parry before closing the distance and executing a tasty Ippon-Seoinage (one arm throw). Kanehara looks for a quick kimura, but other Maeda does a good job of scrambling and his constant movement stifles Kanehara’s submission attempts, which causes Kanehara to simply stand back up, and give several soccer kicks of his own. What continued to follow was nothing short of excellent as there was a total non-stop flow between two men that outside of a few questionable suplexes, and a couple of Boston crab attempts from Kanehara, never felt hokey. It also helped that other Maeda exuded a lot more confidence this time around, and while you can tell that Kanehara is the better athlete, unlike their first bout where there were sequences that felt like Kanehara was just letting Maeda do what he wanted, everything here felt organic and earned.

There was one great spot where Kanehara was on his back, reaping the knee of other Maeda, looking for a leg-attack, in which Maeda countered by twisting around on one leg while stomping the body and face of Kanehara with the other. This sequence, along with others in this match, started to show an evolution in pro-wrestling logic, that had rarely been seen up to this point, where a wrestler had to find creative solutions to a submission as opposed to simply crying and screaming until he inched closer and closer to the ropes, looking for an escape. Speaking of which, there was a great moment in this match where Kanehara had other Maeda in an armbar, and as soon as he arched his back to put pressure on the elbow-joint, Maeda shrieked in pain, and immediately exploded towards the ropes, in what came across as a realistic approach to being put in this predicament, as opposed to the usual contrived theatrics. The fight ends in a 15min draw, and this was a great way to start the year. I suspect that this will wind up being in the 1992 year end highlight reel, and if they can manage to keep Kanehara, and give him a proper spot as a main player, then that coupled with Tamura, could be enough to push them over the top into the preeminent shoot- promotion going forward.

ML: I can't in good conscience call this a rookie match given it's more evolved than at least 95% of the matches we saw in '91. Maeda made incredible strides in just a few weeks, now fighting with the confidence of a seasoned performer. That's really the difference here, as Maeda can be aggressive, taking it to Kanehara in standup where he has the advantage because he now has the belief to let it rip. While Kanehara is still the superior performer, the gap has lessened enough that they can do an organic, back & forth match counter laden bout where Maeda has the advantage in standup & Kanehara has the advantage on the ground, but from the viewer's perspective, it doesn't matter where they are because the quality is very high regardless. The matwork was better in the 1st match because it was more focused on Kanehara working his magic, and thus had some more evolved transitions, but the standup was 10 times better here. ***1/2

The Anti-Imanari Headstomp

25 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 949

Next up is Masahito Kakihara vs Tom Burton. When we last saw Kakihara we witnessed him slap the stuffing out of Jim Boss, in what was probably the stiffest work of 1991. Now hopefully we will witness him continue his dragon-slaying ways, as we substitute one monster in Boss for another in Burton. True to form Kakihara immediately sends an open hand strike down the pipe to Burton, which awakens the wrath of the ferocious beast, and causes him to immediately charge into Kakihara. Interestingly, Kakihara immediately pulls something of an open guard, and tries to work a kimura from that position, but Burton is too strong, and simply powers out of it, and winds up with a side-mount for a brief moment, before Kakihara sneaks his way back to his feet. The next couple of mins saw the same pattern, as Kakihara would nail Burton with some strikes before getting mauled to the ground, but thankfully he was just too crafty to be kept there for long. There was an interesting sequence where Burton trapped the left ankle of Kakihara by wrapping his legs around his ankle, in what seemed like a primitive submission attempt, which allowed Kakihara enough space to slide his way into a rear naked choke, which prompted a rope-escape, and another great moment where Kakihara slid out of a side-headlock and when Burton responded by turtling up, he simply dived over his back and secured a toe-hold, which I could totally see being a viable move in a BJJ match.

The 2nd half of the match saw the tone shift considerably when Burton’s offense was largely negated, and he spent most of his time as a grappling dummy for Kakihara, who tried out various inventive kneebar entries. The one-way traffic ended abruptly towards the 9min mark, when Burton began with a single-leg takedown attempt, and quickly changed it to a clothesline. This led to a stunned Kakihara, who was quickly finished off with the ever-dubious crab from Boston. This wound up being a very bizarre match as the first half was logical and showed a nice contrast between a strong wrestler with a limited move-set vs a much slicker (albeit smaller) athlete in Kakihara. The 2nd half just showed dominating a befuddled Burton, who pulled a win out of nowhere towards the end. I don’t really think this was Burton’s fault as much as it was an issue of the two of them not meshing very well together. There were several nice transitions and sequences from Kakihara, but as a whole this match came off as jarring and bizarre.

 ML: I don't get Kakihara's strategy here, he either leaped in with a wild low percentage kneel kick or locked up with the bigger, stronger man whose only standout skill is wrestling. Kakihara's strength is his striking, particularly his explosive barrages of palm blows, but we rarely saw them because he never fought at distance or in range. The match was adequate but being almost entirely in Burton's world wasn't to its benefit. Basically, Burton was okay, and he basically did his thing, without too much interplay.

Any hopes I had of the next match turning things around are quickly dashed, as JT Southern is set to make a return against Tatuyo Nakano. Surely this return to the well of shame was due to Billy Scott’s sudden departure from the promotion, as he was mandated to stop wearing his singlets and switch over to a more pro-wrestling flavored lime green outfit. Billy wasn’t crazy about having to do this, but was willing to keep them happy, that is until he got his paycheck from the last event and noticed that they had deducted $500 as a cost towards the outfit. This was a deal-breaker for Scott, who told them that he would not return unless they paid for the outfit, as it was their idea, and he didn’t want to wear it in the first place. This led to him being away from the promotion for almost two years, until they agreed to not only pay him his this money back, but to also hire Billy Robinson as his full time coach, which led to him coming back and staying him them until their closure in 1996.

The match hasn’t even started yet, and the fans are laughing at JT Southern for going to the wrong ring corner to start his match, after the ref shows JT where the correct corner is located, the bout begins with Nakano throwing a few kicks, and generally just feeling out his opponent. JT has a height and reach advantage that if he had any idea of what he was doing he could have certainly utilized, but instead kept opting to try and initiate a standard pro-wrestling tie-up.  This match wound up being one of the worst so far, probably even worse than the JT/Takada bout from 91. Southern’s offense only seemed to consist of holding onto an appendage for as long as possible, until Nakano would get bored and hit or kick his way out. Nakano didn’t really seem to know what to do with JT, and thankfully after 7min, he simply kicked into high gear, hit a suplex and a single-leg crab for the win. This was terrible, and really is highlighting how much losing Scott is going to hurt their roster. There is now no foreign talent in this promotion that is a real asset and can work a high-caliber match in the shoot- They have Albright and his gimmick (which is fine for what it is) and Burton and Boss can be passable in small doses but they are going to have to find a solid replacement for Scott quickly, or step-up Kanehara’s role in the company.

ML: Nakano is the worst native, but he's fine when there's someone to pull something out of him. Unfortunately, Southern is the worst in our sphere, period, so this is just a disaster waiting to unfold. This wasn't as inept as JT's other performances, but it was possibly the worst match we've seen so far. It was just pointless, with both guys trading stretches of bending each others legs or arms until Nakano fired up for a cheap head kick, suplex, and carny submission.

25 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 950

*Vol. 22 Continued.... *

Not a moment too soon, we get Kiyoshi Tamura vs Yuko Miyato, and this may be just what we need to turn this evening around. Thankfully things start off explosively as Tamura charges in with a high kick, and a relentless palm-strike assault, but Miyato stands his ground and fires back with several stiff slaps of his own, before downing Tamura with a spinning back kick to the stomach. So far this is very intense, and believable. Tamura gets back up, and Miyato tries to clinch with him while throwing some knees, but Tamura slickly switches behind him, and nails a standing rear naked choke followed by a takedown. Yuko spent a while deflecting the choke from being fully sunken in, before being able to pry out enough to attempt a straight-armbar against Tamura, who countered with a beautiful cartwheel, and right back into a RNC. However, Tamura made the same mistake that many BJJ white-belts do when he crossed his feet while attempting the choke, which allowed Miyato to attack one of his ankles.

They are now both back on their feet, and Tamura quickly goes for a wrist tie-up with Miyato, and after he gets it, starts to shift his bodyweight side to side, in something similar to a feint, as if he is weighing his next move, when suddenly Miyato explodes into the finest fireman’s takedown we’ve yet seen.  Miyato then gives us some interesting ne-waza when he controls Tamura’s head with a modified leg-scissor while fishing for a kimura. Once he gets the kimura, he quickly forgoes the head control and explodes into the submission, causing an instant rope-escape and a cry of anguish from Tamura. The rest of this bout was total fire, as it saw Tamura dwarfed on the scoreboard by Miyato, as his occasional submission was worth a lot less than Miyato’s knockdowns. Eventually, Tamura was able to get Miyato in the center of the ring and secure an ankle-lock for the victory.

This was another excellent match, and it really has me rethinking my opinion of Miyato. Before this, I kind of just looked at him as an unassuming, and middling figure that could be good, but was too tethered to the old UWF ways to be of much interest, but he proved me wrong here, as a motivated Miyato is capable of a top-tier performance, and really shined here tonight. Both men brought a great explosive energy to the ring and has made me forget about the two matches prior.

ML: The much-anticipated rematch of the 2nd best UWF-I match of '91 was total fire, as these two just blitzed each other from start to finish. One of the great things about Tamura is he's able to up the speed, pace, and intensity in a manner that is not only believable, but based on the urgency that's so lacking in ordinary pro wrestling, where fighters are more concerned with playing to the crowd & posing, just stalling at every opportunity when the opponent is down so they have to do less. I really believed in the early near finishes because they were working at the rate that others can only approach when they kick it into high gear for the last minute or so. There was a great early sequence where Miyato countered into a hammerlock when Tamura was trying to pull him back into the center to reapply the rear naked choke, but Tamura did one of his crazy one-armed headstands to pivot into a position where he could retake Miyato's neck. Another great sequence saw Miyato do a hip toss into an armbar, but Tamura countered with a backwards roll into an Achilles' tendon hold. The whole match was back & forth like this. The only downside is it was even shorter than their 1st match, which was perhaps the shortest match I've ever rated great. I'm glad they never slowed down, the whole match had the feel of a finishing sequence because of that, and it was really brilliant, though their previous match was perhaps a little better because it was longer, or I was slightly disappointed that they ran through the points so quickly it was obviously not going to last much longer. Regardless though, this was amazing, and will surely wind up being one of the top matches of '92. ****1/4

Now it’s time for Japan vs America as Kazuo Yamazaki & Yoji Anjo must now face Jim Boss and Gary Albright. Surely this card was quickly thrown together on paper as it’s been less than three weeks since their mega year-end event so we have what appears to be a main event that was slapped together just so we can get more talent onto the card. Still, the last couple of tag-matches that the UWFI has put on, have been surprisingly awesome, so I’m going into this with some high expectations. The match starts with Anjo and Boss, and right away Boss has to take some stiff strikes on his way to a takedown of Anjo. The takedown doesn’t last long however, before Anjo is back on his feet and back to lighting up Boss some more in the standup exchanges. I have to give Boss a lot of credit, as he seems more willing than a lot of his peers to really take some abuse in the ring, which adds a lot to his credibility. It’s not long before things switch over to Yamazaki/Albright, and right away we see how Yamazaki is really above the rest of his peers in terms of craftsmanship, as it’s the subtleties that he adds to the proceedings that makes his work so good. Right away Yamazaki goes for a kick, and gets slammed down for his trouble, so he pauses, thinks about his next move, and begins to feint a grappling exchange in order to land a thunderous kick to Albright’s thigh. After their sequences we go back to Anjo/Boss, and Boss demonstrates a common problem that newcomers to this have, as outside of his fearlessness and takedown abilities, Boss doesn’t seem to have any understanding of either striking or submissions, so there is little he can really do with Anjo once the fight is on the ground. The fight ends just shy of the 16min mark when our favorite zebra-warrior took a flight on Air Albright which resulted in a knockout loss. While this was certainly entertaining it was a few notches below the last couple of tag-matches we saw, and still suffers from what feels like a lack of purpose, or any real stakes, but that is going to be true of any tag-match that would exist in a format like this. It was easily the most akin to a standard pro-wrestling match out of what we saw this evening. Still, it was entertaining, and not a bad way to end the evening.

ML: Finally, Albright was in a match that was allowed to be somewhat competitive. This had the usual pro wrestling problem that tag matches with a big star or unstoppable force have, in that the match was all about them, but in order to save and/or protect them, they were only in sporadically. Boss worked hard, but there's no heat on or really interest in him, so while this was often the better portion of the match, it came off somewhat flat & meaningless. Yamazaki did a good job here. This wasn't his match, but he perhaps better found a balance between his old more pro wrestling and his new more realistic still seeming thoughtful and patient but knowing this had to be quicker & he had to go. He actually managed to German suplex Gary, and nearly extended the armbar on the follow up. Though Albright was certainly the dominant force in the contest, and ultimately got the win despite this being the match he should have lost with Boss doing the job because he was miles below the other 3, it at least didn't seem a given that Albright would beat Yamazaki in a singles match. I wouldn't quite call this good, but at the same time it was at least better than most of Takada's main events.

25 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 951

Vol. 22 Continued... 

Conclusion: This was not a bad way to kick off the new year. This was intended to be a small event as they were just coming off their huge year-end production, and when judged accordingly I would say that they succeeded, but not without exposing some problems that will hopefully be rectified in the days to come. They had two awesome matches in Kanehara/Maeda and Tamura/Miyato but they not only need to burn the rolodex that contains JT Southern’s phone number, but they also need to find a real replacement for Billy Scott, or at least be willing to give up on using gajin talent outside of cannon fodder. Kakihara is awesome, but unlike Tamura who was able to make Burton look good in their bout from 91, he didn’t seem up to the task of carrying an inferior opponent to an 8min match. His match with Boss from last month worked well, but that was also due to it being a blistering blitzkrieg that ended quickly and didn’t have prolonged grappling exchanges. Since they seem to be unwilling to show any weaknesses in Takada outside of a possible loss to Albright in the future, then they are going to have to figure out a way to cultivate their other talent in ways to keep an interesting and compelling narrative. They have a lot of good talent now, and with a couple more key players, used correctly, they could easily be an unstoppable force in the days ahead, but from what we’ve seen so far it seems inevitable that they are going to find a way to screw this up.

ML: Although a humble, small show, this is not to be missed with two very strong matches and some decent filler. If they could have had a standing bout in place of the Tennessee travesty, this could, perhaps, have been a memorable show.

* If you would like to see this event in full, then head on over to www.patreon.com/KakutogiRoad where it, and many other rare treasures await you! *

*In Other News*

n 1-12-91 the Sediokaikan Karate organization held the 1st Towa Cup Karate Tournament Championships in which 57 men competed for an unprecedented 10-million-yen grand prize (which approximates out to roughly 100,000 U.S. dollars.) This was an amazing tournament that took a variety of karate fighters and put them in a format similar to kickboxing, in that they had to wear boxing gloves and the fight took place in a ring, but unlike kickboxing, each round was individually judged on a ten-point must system, for as many rounds as it took to determine a winner. After each round, three judges would assess the fight and either award the fight to the blue corner, the red corner, or a draw. This led to a lot of exciting fights that ended in the first round, although there were a few that went several rounds. All strikes (outside of groin shots, or eye pokes) were legal, and clinching was allowed as well, although most fighters didn’t spend a lot of time stalling in a clinch as the rules necessitated going full-speed all the time, as if you didn’t win your round, you were eliminated for good.

The eventual final combatants were upcoming sediokaikan fighter, Taiei Kin (who had to have an absolute war of attrition against Yoshinori Nishi in his 2nd bout, which wound up being the best fight of the night) vs established karate and kickboxing star Masaaki Satake. This event had been running smoothly and without incident, until this final match, when the judges apparently did not like the prospect of having their established star in Satake lose, so they seemingly engaged in some blatant judging shenanigans to sway the fight to their liking.

25 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 952

Vol. 22 Continued.... 

Round 1 was a cautious round for both men, but when we did see action it was in the form of mutual exchanges, and Taiei got about 2-3 clean shots for every one of Satake’s during these encounters. He would also occasionally pepper Satake’s leg with well-timed kicks outside of these exchanges. 2 judges called the round a draw, while the one honest judge ruled it in favor of Kin. Round 2 saw Satake doing a bit better, as he was occasionally getting in some nice counter punches on Kin, but was still being out struck by Kin in a seeming 2-1 ratio, and what happened next was one of the most utterly corrupt things I’ve witnessed in kickboxing/karate. The round ended with 2 judges ruling in favor of Kin, and one calling it a draw. Then when Kin was celebrating, there was some commotion at the judges table, and the ref had the fighters sit down while the judges had a meeting with founder, Kazuyoshi Ishii, and some of the other event officials, all the while Akira Maeda (who was in attendance) looked bewildered at the entire affair. After their pow-wow Ishii grabbed a microphone and announced another round would take place. A 3rd round did indeed take place, and this time Satake brought his a-game and won convincingly by every metric. This was a shameful ending to what was otherwise a great event, and I really enjoyed the rule set. By having every round leading to a judge’s decision, it forced the fighters to always fight with 100% intensity, but by also having unlimited rounds, it didn’t force the judges to just arbitrarily pick a winner, either. Before the ending fiasco, everything was judged fairly in my estimation, and I wouldn’t mind seeing this type of round structure be used for future events. Also, Taiei Kin made a very impressive showing here tonight, and will be a force in the future if he continues to compete.

Even Maeda Knows This is Wrong....

This entire event along with many other breathless wonderments await you at www.patreon.com/KakutogiRoad

***Over 100 Japanese reporters attended the year end UWF-I event held on 12-22-91, which is remarkable as that is even more than the number of press that attended the 12-12-91 SWS event held in the Tokyo Dome, which featured Hulk Hogan in the main event.

***Rob Kaman is rumored to be planning on fighting at the next FIGHTING NETWORK RINGS event on 1-25-92, although his opponent is unknown at this time.

***The PWFG is reportedly negotiating to bring in Roberto Duran for a fight against Yoshiaki Fujiwara. Originally, they were going to use this match as the main event on the card in Miami, however Duran, for tax reasons, wants the match outside the United States. One has to wonder if the recent success of the UWF-I’s boxer vs wrestler gimmick is prompting the PWFG to follow suit?

***Cynthia Rothrock took some time out of her hectic schedule recently while shooting her latest movie, Tiger Claws, in order to join up with Matthew Broderick, Kris Kristofferson, and several members of the Toronto Blue Jays, in order to team up with the Church of Scientology’s “Say no to drugs…Say Yes to Life” campaign. Scientology spokeswoman, Shelly Oake commended the move by saying that when thought leaders like Rothrock took a stand, it helped to depopularize the idea of taking drugs as being a viable solution to life’s problems.

***Aikido black-belt, and action film star, Steven Seagal, recently opened a martial arts themed restaurant in the downtown area of Chicago. The restaurant is reportedly decorated with kendo gear, samurai armor, and all of this is contained within a new-wave aesthetic. Over 500 people attended the grand opening including Michael Jordan, Robert De Niro, John Candy, Bill Murray, and Chicago Mayor Richard Daley. Seagal hired Singapore-based Wing Chun expert, Randy Williams to head up security for the restaurant.

24 days ago
9/14/13
Posts: 7059

I thought the other riders on the kakutogi road might be interested in my next highlight

24 days ago
1/1/01
Posts: 13875

I hope you use the bloodsport “kumite” song or the “best around” karate kid tune.

24 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 953
flemingo -

I thought the other riders on the kakutogi road might be interested in my next highlight

Awesome! I'm sure you'll include the time he knocked out Wayne Shamrock. 

24 days ago
1/9/20
Posts: 954
de braco -

I hope you use the bloodsport “kumite” song or the “best around” karate kid tune.

The bloodsport theme is the best. Every time I hear it, I go around public places and quite inappropriately chant "Kumite, Kumite!" to everyone’s chagrin.

24 days ago
9/14/13
Posts: 7060
de braco -

I hope you use the bloodsport “kumite” song or the “best around” karate kid tune.

Im saving those for people i actually like