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5 of the strangest martial arts you've never heard of

5 of the STRANGEST martial arts you've never heard of
5 of the strangest martial arts you've never heard of

5 of the strangest martial arts you've never heard of

Ever since the UFC became a global representative organization of MMA, numerous martial arts have come into the forefront of combative history. At UFC 1, there was everything from a Boxer, Karateka, Sumo Wrestler, Taekwondo practitioner, Kung Fu and of course the now famed Brazilian Jiu-jitsu expert.

These styles have of course become household names within the martial arts community and to those that are fans of mixed martial arts. But there are still many martial arts that are obscure and strange to even the most well-studied martial arts fan.

Here are five that will boggle your mind:

5) Okichitaw

Okichitaw, founded by Canadian martial artist George J. Lépine, is based on methods developed by the Plains Cree First Nations. Lépine’s has background in Taekwondo, Hapkido, Judo, wrestling and tomahawk throwing techniques. He’s blended these styles to create his own unique form that has allowed him to preserve and keep pushing the traditional values of his aboriginal ancestry. Okichitaw was recognized as a unique indigenous martial art of Canada by the World Martial Arts Union in 2002.

Okichitaw

Okichitaw

Okichitaw

Okichitaw

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Next: Taekkyeon

4) Taekkyeon

You’ve probably heard of Taekwondo and even Hapkido. You may even know that both of those styles are from Korea, but both are derived and influenced by Japanese martial arts. Taekkyeon on the other hand is a native martial art that is recorded to be at least over two centuries old. Unlike the hard rigid movements of Taekwondo and Hapkido, the techniques and movement of the practitioners are more fluid and makes it almost seem as if they are dancing.

Taekkyeon

Taekkyeon

Taekkyeon

Taekkyeon

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Next: Kalaripayattu

3) Kalaripayattu

Indigenous to the Kerala in South India, Kalaripayattu is possibly one of the oldest martial arts and fighting systems to exist. Sangham literature has records showing that the system could be as old as 3rd century BC. It has been described a combative fighting system that used weaponry such as bows, swords, spears and shields. Imagine the movie 300 but with combatants hailing from southern India. This system wasn't made for Bollywood for sure.

Kalaripayattu

Kalaripayattu

Kalaripayattu

Kalaripayattu

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Next: Systema

2) Systema

This Russian martial art Systema may actually be more familiar than the rest considering videos of its wacky, arm flailing movements have been hitting the rounds on the internet the last few years. The fighting form was reserved for Russia’s Special Operations Units in the early 20th century. But it has grown in popularity since. The practitioner is asked to be completely free of tension while applying techniques while being precise. This may explain the flailing arms you’ve seen.

Systema

Systema

Systema

Systema

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Next: Kinamotay

1) Kinamotay

Also known as Kino Mutai, Kina Mutay, Kinamutay – Kinamotay is a martial art that has its origins coming from the Philippines. The martial art usually involves a lot of familiar techniques such as pressure points, submissions and grappling. But what makes this martial art so odd is that in the island of Cebu, the martial art has been culturally associated with the act of biting by women. And the bite aspect furthers its focus by allowing the practitioner to be in a position where they can “continuously” bite. It’s quite possible that Mike Tyson was learning it prior to his fight against Evander Holyfield.

Kinamotay

Kinamotay

Kinamotay

Kinamotay

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Clyde Erwin Barretto is an emphatic obsessed fan of mixed martial arts, combat sports and body movement. Follow him on Twitter @ClydeBarretto.

Next: Top 6 least effective martial arts for real situations